de-en  Das Fräulein von Scuderi - 9 von E.T.A. Hoffmann Hard
At midnight, she had been woken up by a soft knock at her chamber door and heard Olivier's voice, who adjured her to immediately get up, because the father was about to die. Aghast, she jumped up and opened the door. Pale, face distorted, dripping with perspiration and light in hand, Olivier staggered to the workshop, where she followed him. There the father had lain with staring eyes, with a death rattle in his throat. Wailing, she had flung herself on him and only then noticed his bloody shirt. Olivier gently pulled her away and then set about washing a wound on the father's left breast with balsam and bandaging it. Meanwhile the father regained consciousness, stopped rattling in his throat and looked soulfully at her and then at Olivier, grasped her hand, placed it in Olivier's and pressed them both strongly. Both she and Olivier had fallen to their knees before their father's bed, the latter had risen with a penetrating cry, but immediately sank back on the bed and passed away with a deep sigh. Now both of them had wailed and moaned loudly. Olivier had reported that the master craftsman whom he, on the latters request, had had to accompany on an errand, had been killed in his presence and how he had carried the heavy man, whom he had not thought to have received a deadly wound, with the most strenous effort to his home. As soon as morning came, the servants, who had noticed the rumbling, the loud crying and wailing in the night, were coming up and had found her kneeling at her father's corpse completely inconsolable. Then there had been some noise, the Marechaussee had entered by force and dragged Oliver as the murderer of his master craftsman into jail. Madelon now added the most touching portrayal of virtue, piety, loyality of her beloved Olivier. How he highly honored the master as if he were his own father, how he fully reciprocated his love, how he made him his son-in-law despite his poverty, because his skill matched his loyalty, his noble character. Mädeln told all of this from her innermost heart and concluded that if Olivier had plunged the dagger into the breast of her father in her presence, she would more easily regard this to be an illusion of the devil than believe that Olivier could be capable of such a horrible, gruesome crime.
The Scuderi, extremely moved by Madelon's unspeakable anguish and fully inclined to regard Olivier as innocent, made inquires and confirmed everything that Madelon had said about the domestic relationship of the master with his apprentice. The house staff and the neighbors unanimously praised Olivier as the model of modest, devout, loyal and industrious behavior. No one knew of anything bad about him. And still, the conversation was about the ghastly crime. Everyone shrugged their shoulders and said there was something incomprehensible about it.
Olivier, brought to trial before the Chambre ardente court, very firmly and steadfastly denied, as the Scuderi had heard, having committed the crime he was accused of, and asserted that his master had been attacked and stabbed in the street in his presence, but that he had dragged him home, still alive, where he very soon passed away. This also matched with Madelon's story.
Again and once more again the Scuderi let herself the smallest circumstances of the terrible event be repeated. She closely investigated whether a dispute had ever occurred between the master and the apprentice, whether Olivier perhaps was not completely free of that quick temper that often overcomes the most good-natured person like a blind rage and induces actions that seem to exclude all the arbitrariness of behavior. But the more ardently Madelon spoke of the serene domestic happiness in which the three people lived united in the deepest love, the more every shadow of doubt disappeared against the Olivier who was accused of the death. Examining everything meticulously, assuming that Olivier nevertheless was Cardillac's murderer notwithstanding all of that which would speak loudly for his innocence, the Scuderi did not find any reason in the realm of possibility for the terrible deed that in any case had to destroy Olivier's happiness. - "He is poor, but clever. He succeeds in gaining the affection of the very famous master, he loves the master's daughter, the master fosters his love, fortune, prosperity for his entire life is opened up to him. God knows, but be it now that Olivier, irritated in what way, overpowered by anger, murderously attacked his benefactor, his father, what fiendish hypocrisy involves behaving in such a way after the deed, when it really happened!" - utterly convinced of Oliver's innocence, the Scuderi decided to save the innocent youngster at all cost.
It seemed to her the most advisable thing to do, before she would perhaps call upon the grace of the king himself, was to call on President la Regnie to draw his attention to all the circumstances which had to speak for Olivier's innocence and so perhaps arouse in the President's soul an inner favorable opinion of the accused which should be beneficially communicated to the judges.
La Regnie received the Scuderi with great respect, to which the worthy lady, highly revered by the king himself, could make a just claim He quietly listened to everything she stated about the appalling act, about Olivier's circumstances, about his character. A subtle, almost sardonic smile was all by which he showed that the assertions, the exhortations accompanied by frequent tears about how every judge does not have to be the enemy of the accused but must also be mindful of everything that would speak in his favor, did not completely pass by deaf ears. When the Madam now finally completely exhausted, tears drying up from her eyes, fell silent, la Regnie began: "It is very worthy of your admirable heart, my Lady, that you, stirred by the tears of a young girl in love, believe everything that she alleges, indeed, that you are incapable of grasping the thought of a terrible crime, but it is otherwise with the judge who is used to demolishing the larva of brazen hypocrisy. Well, it may not be my office to develop the course of a criminal trial for anyone who asks me. Miss! I act my part, hardly mind the judgment of the world. Let the villians tremble in front of the Chambre ardente who knows no retribution but blood and fire. But before you, my dignified Lady, I do not want to be estimated as a monster of hardness and cruelty, thus deign me presenting clear before your eyes with a few words the blood guilt of the young evildoer who - thanks to heaven - is forfeited to vengeance. Your sharp mind itself will then spurn the good nature that honors you, but would not suit me at all. Thus! - In the morning, René Cardillac is found murdered by a dagger thrust. There' s nobody with him but his journeyman Olivier Brusson and his daughter. In Olivier's chamber, among other things, a dagger stained with fresh blood is found that fits the wound exactly. 'Cardillac was,' Olivier says, 'knocked down before my eyes that night.' - " Did they want to rob him?" "I don't know that! - 'You went with him, and it was impossible for you to fend off the murderer? - to clutch him? to call for help?" 'Fifteen, perhaps twenty steps before me walked the Master, I followed him." 'Why on earth the distance?" - 'Master wanted it that way.' 'What on earth was Master Cardillac doing out on the street at such a late hour?' - "I can't say that." 'He usually never left the house after nine o'clock in the evening?' - Here Olivier stops, he is upset, he sighs, he sheds tears, he assures by all that's holy, that Cardillac had really gone out that night and found his death. Now pay attention indeed, my lady. It has been proven, to the utmost certainty, that Cardillac did not leave the house that night, therefore Olivier's claim that he had really gone out with him is a naughty lie. The front door is equipped with a heavy lock, which makes a pervasive sound when locked or unlocked; but then the door wing moves creaking and howling in the hinges, so that, as conducted tests have shown, even in the uppermost floor of the house the noise resonates. Well, on the bottom floor, next to the front door, the old Master Claude Patru lives with his housekeeper, a person of almost eighty years, but still alert and active. These two people heard Cardillac come down the stairs at nine o'clock that evening as usual, close and lock the door with a lot of noise, then go up again, read aloud the evening blessing and then, as could be heard from the slamming door, go into his bedroom. Master Claude suffers from insomnia as the elderly are wont to do. Also that night he could not get to sleep. The caretaker suggested that it may have been about nine-thirty when she went through the hall to the kitchen, put the light on and sat herself down to join Master Claude at the table with an old chronicle, which she read while the old man, pondering his thoughts, soon went and sat down in the armchair and then shortly afterwards got up again and, in order to tire himself out and be able to sleep, walked slowly and quietly up and down the room. All remained quiet and still until after midnight. Then above her she heard sharp footsteps, a hard fall, as if a heavy object had fallen to the floor and then almost immediately afterwards a muffled groaning. They both were getting odd fear and trepidation. The shivers of the appalling act that just done passed by them. - With the bright morning came to light what started in the darkness." "But", the Scuderi broke in, "but for the sake of all saints, can you with all the circumstances I only told copious think about any inducement for this deed of hell?" - "Hm," replied la Regnie, "Cardillac was not poor - in possession of excellent stones." "Didn't", the Scuderi continued, "didn't the daughter get everything then? - You forget that Olivier was going to be Cardillac's son-in-law." "He was perhaps forced to share it, or even just murder for others," said la Regnie. "Share, to murder for others?" asked the Scuderi in full astonishment. "Learn," continued the President, "learn my lady that Olivier would have bled long since on Greveplatz, had his deed not been related to the closely-concealed mystery that had been waiting so threatening all over Paris. Apparently, Oliver belongs to that despicable gang which, all attention, all the effort, mocking all the scrutiny of the courts, knew how to conduct its tricks safely and with impunity. Through him, everything will - has to become clear. Cardillac's wound is very similar to those of all murdered and robbed people on the street and inside the houses. Then, however, the most crucial thing; since that time, when Olivier Brusson was detained, all murders, all robberies have ceased. The streets are as safe during the night as they are during the day. Proof enough that Olivier might have led that gang of killers. He doesn't intend to confess yet, but there are means to make him speak against his will." "And Madelon", the Scuderi called out, "and Madelon, the faithful, innocent dove." "Well", said la Regnie with a toxic smile, "well, who will bail, that she is not within the conspiracy. Does she care about her father? Her tears are only for the murderer". "What do you say", cried the Scuderi, "it's not possible, her father! this girl!" "Gah!" la Regnie continued, "gah! just think about the Brinvillier! You may forgive me, if I find myself soon compelled to wrench your protege away from you and have her thrown into the Conciergerie. " - The Scuderi was horror-stricken with this terrible suspicion. She felt as if no faith, no virtue could persist before that terrifying man, as if he caught sight of murder and blood guilt in the deepest, most secret thoughts. She got up. "Be human," that was all she could muster, breathing laboriously. Already about to go downstairs, where the president had escorted her with ceremonial gentleness, she was struck by a strange idea, not knowing how that happened. "I wonder whether I would be permitted to see the unfortunate Olivier Brusson?" Turning fast she asked the president. He looked at her with worrisome expression; then his face twisted into that disgusting smile that he owned. "Certainly", he said, "certainly, my dignified Mademoiselle, you - trusting more in your inner voice than in what is happening before our eyes - seek to examine yourself Olivier's guilt or innocence. If you don't dread the dark sojourn of the crime, if it is not averse to seeing the images of depravity in all its gradations, the doors of the Conciergerie should be open for you in two hours. This Olivier, whose fate you are caring about, will be presented to you.
In fact, the Scuderi could not convince herself of the young man's guilt. Everything gave evidence against him, and yes, no judge of the world, with such crucial facts, would have acted differently, as la Regnie. But the picture of homely happiness, as Madelon put it before the Scuderi's eyes in the liveliest way, outshined any suspicion; and so she preferred to assume an unexplainable secret rather than to believe in what her whole inner part was incensing against.
She intended of having Olivier tell her once more, how things happened during that fateful night, and, as far as possible, penetrating into a secret that might remain sealed to the judges, because it seemed worthless to worry about it any further.
unit 2
Entsetzt sei sie aufgesprungen und habe die Tür geöffnet.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 4
Da habe der Vater gelegen mit starren Augen und geröchelt im Todeskampfe.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 5
Jammernd habe sie sich auf ihn gestürzt und nun erst sein blutiges Hemde bemerkt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 9
Nun hätten sie beide laut gejammert und geklagt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 19
Auch dies stimmte also mit Madelons Erzählung überein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 24
– "Er ist arm, aber geschickt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 34
Fräulein!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 35
ich tue meine Pflicht, wenig kümmert mich das Urteil der Welt.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 36
Zittern sollen die Bösewichter vor der Chambre ardente, die keine Strafe kennt als Blut und Feuer.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 38
der Rache verfallen ist, klar vor Augen lege.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 40
– Also!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 41
– Am Morgen wird René Cardillac durch einen Dolchstoß ermordet gefunden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 42
Niemand ist bei ihm, als sein Geselle Olivier Brusson und die Tochter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 44
'Cardillac ist', spricht Olivier, 'in der Nacht vor meinen Augen niedergestoßen worden.'
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 45
– 'Man wollte ihn berauben?'
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 46
'Das weiß ich nicht!'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 47
– 'Du gingst mit ihm, und es war dir nicht möglich, dem Mörder zu wehren?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 48
– ihn festzuhalten?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 49
um Hilfe zu rufen?'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 50
'Funfzehn, wohl zwanzig Schritte vor mir ging der Meister, ich folgte ihm.'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 51
'Warum in aller Welt so entfernt?'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 52
– 'Der Meister wollt' es so.'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 53
'Was hatte überhaupt Meister Cardillac so spät auf der Straße zu tun?'
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 54
– 'Das kann ich nicht sagen.'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 55
'Sonst ist er aber doch niemals nach neun Uhr abends aus dem Hause gekommen?'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 57
Nun merkt aber wohl auf, mein Fräulein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 62
Meister Claude leidet an Schlaflosigkeit, wie es alten Leuten wohl zu gehen pflegt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 63
Auch in jener Nacht konnte er kein Auge zutun.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 65
Es blieb alles still und ruhig bis nach Mitternacht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 67
In beide kam eine seltsame Angst und Beklommenheit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 68
Die Schauer der entsetzlichen Tat, die eben begangen, gingen bei ihnen vorüber.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 69
– Mit dem hellen Morgen trat dann ans Licht, was in der Finsternis begonnen."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 71
– "Hm", erwiderte la Regnie, "Cardillac war nicht arm – im Besitz vortrefflicher Steine."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 72
"Bekam", fuhr die Scuderi fort, "bekam denn nicht alles die Tochter?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 73
– Ihr vergeßt, daß Olivier Cardillacs Schwiegersohn werden sollte."
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 74
"Er mußte vielleicht teilen oder gar nur für andere morden", sprach la Regnie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 75
"Teilen, für andere morden?"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 76
fragte die Scuderi in vollem Erstaunen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 79
Durch ihn wird – muß alles klarwerden.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 82
Sicher sind die Straßen zur Nachtzeit wie am Tage.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 83
Beweis genug, daß Olivier vielleicht an der Spitze jener Mordbande stand.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 84
Noch will er nicht bekennen, aber es gibt Mittel, ihn sprechen zu machen wider seinen Willen."
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 85
"Und Madelon", rief die Scuderi, "und Madelon, die treue, unschuldige Taube."
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 87
Was ist ihr an dem Vater gelegen, nur dem Mordbuben gelten ihre Tränen."
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 88
"Was sagt Ihr", schrie die Scuderi, "es ist nicht möglich; den Vater!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 89
dieses Mädchen!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 90
– "Oh!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 91
fuhr la Regnie fort, "oh!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 92
denkt doch nur an die Brinvillier!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 94
– Der Scuderi ging ein Grausen an bei diesem entsetzlichen Verdacht.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 96
Sie stand auf.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 97
"Seid menschlich", das war alles, was sie beklommen, mühsam atmend hervorbringen konnte.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 99
"Würd' es mir wohl erlaubt sein, den unglücklichen Olivier Brusson zu sehen?"
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 100
So fragte sie den Präsidenten, sich rasch umwendend.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 104
Man wird Euch diesen Olivier, dessen Sdlicksal Eure Teilnahme erregt, vorstellen."
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 105
In der Tat konnte sich die Scuderi von der Schuld des jungen Menschen nicht überzeugen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
Scharing7 1982  translated  unit 96  1 month, 1 week ago
Scharing7 1982  commented on  unit 78  1 month, 1 week ago
Scharing7 1982  translated  unit 40  1 month, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 89  1 month, 1 week ago
Scharing7 1982  translated  unit 90  1 month, 1 week ago
Scharing7 1982  translated  unit 89  1 month, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 99  1 month, 1 week ago
Scharing7 1982  commented on  unit 99  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 4988  commented on  unit 16  1 month, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 4988  commented on  unit 18  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 65  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 62  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  translated  unit 48  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 6  1 month, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 4176  commented on  unit 6  1 month, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 4988  commented on  unit 15  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  translated  unit 34  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 4  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 10  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4176  commented on  unit 7  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4176  commented on  unit 12  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4176  commented on  unit 10  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 4988  commented on  unit 11  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 4988  commented on  unit 10  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 12  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 8  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 9  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 4988  commented on  unit 8  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 1982  commented on  unit 7  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 1982  commented on  unit 4  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 1982  commented on  unit 9  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 4988  commented on  unit 13  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 1982  commented on  unit 3  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 3931  commented on  unit 5  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 1982  commented on  unit 2  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 1982  commented on  unit 5  1 month, 3 weeks ago

Um Mitternacht war sie durch leises Klopfen an ihrer Stubentüre geweckt worden und hatte Oliviers Stimme vernommen, der sie beschworen, doch nur gleich aufzustehen, weil der Vater im Sterben liege. Entsetzt sei sie aufgesprungen und habe die Tür geöffnet. Olivier, bleich und entstellt, von Schweiß triefend, sei, das Licht in der Hand, mit wankenden Schritten nach der Werkstatt gegangen, sie ihm gefolgt. Da habe der Vater gelegen mit starren Augen und geröchelt im Todeskampfe. Jammernd habe sie sich auf ihn gestürzt und nun erst sein blutiges Hemde bemerkt. Olivier habe sie sanft weggezogen und sich dann bemüht, eine Wunde auf der linken Brust des Vaters mit Wundbalsam zu waschen und zu verbinden. Währenddessen sei des Vaters Besinnung zurückgekehrt, er habe zu röcheln aufgehört und sie, dann aber Olivier mit seelenvollem Blick angeschaut, ihre Hand ergriffen, sie in Oliviers Hand gelegt und beide heftig gedrückt. Beide, Olivier und sie, wären bei dem Lager des Vaters auf die Knie gefallen, er habe sich mit einem schneidenden Laut in die Höhe gerichtet, sei aber gleich wieder zurückgesunken und mit einem tiefen Seufzer verschieden. Nun hätten sie beide laut gejammert und geklagt. Olivier habe erzählt, wie der Meister auf einem Gange, den er mit ihm auf sein Geheiß in der Nacht habe machen müssen, in seiner Gegenwart ermordet worden und wie er mit der größten Anstrengung den schweren Mann, den er nicht auf den Tod verwundet gehalten, nach Hause getragen. Sowie der Morgen angebrochen, wären die Hausleute, denen das Gepolter, das laute Weinen und jammern in der Nacht aufgefallen, heraufgekommen und hätten sie noch ganz trostlos bei der Leiche des Vaters kniend gefunden. Nun sei Lärm entstanden, die Marechaussee eingedrungen und Olivier als Mörder seines Meisters ins Gefängnis geschleppt worden. Madelon fügte nun die rührendste Schilderung von der Tugend, der Frömmigkeit, der Treue ihres geliebten Oliviers hinzu. Wie er den Meister, als sei er sein eigener Vater, hoch in Ehren gehalten, wie dieser seine Liebe in vollem Maß erwidert, wie er ihn trotz seiner Armut zum Eidam erkoren, weil seine Geschicklichkeit seiner Treue, seinem edlen Gemüt gleichgekommen. Das alles erzählte Madelon aus dem innersten Herzen heraus und schloß damit, daß, wenn Olivier in ihrem Beisein dem Vater den Dolch in die Brust gestoßen hätte, sie dies eher für ein Blendwerk des Satans halten, als daran glauben würde, daß Olivier eines solchen entsetzlichen, grauenvollen Verbrechens fähig sein könne.
Die Scuderi, von Madelons namenlosen Leiden auf das tiefste gerührt und ganz geneigt, den armen Olivier für unschuldig zu halten, zog Erkundigungen ein und fand alles bestätigt, was Madelon über das häusliche Verhältnis des Meisters mit seinem Gesellen erzählt hatte. Die Hausleute, die Nachbaren rühmten einstimmig den Olivier als das Muster eines sittigen, frommen, treuen, fleißigen Betragens, niemand wußte Böses von ihm, und doch, war von der gräßlichen Tat die Rede, zuckte jeder die Achseln und meinte, darin liege etwas Unbegreifliches.
Olivier, vor die Chambre ardente gestellt, leugnete, wie die Scuderi vernahm, mit der größten Standhaftigkeit, mit dem hellsten Freimut die ihm angeschuldigte Tat und behauptete, daß sein Meister in seiner Gegenwart auf der Straße angefallen und niedergestoßen worden, daß er ihn aber noch lebendig nach Hause geschleppt, wo er sehr bald verschieden sei. Auch dies stimmte also mit Madelons Erzählung überein.
Immer und immer wieder ließ sich die Scuderi die kleinsten Umstände des schrecklichen Ereignisses wiederholen. Sie forschte genau, ob jemals ein Streit zwischen Meister und Gesellen vorgefallen, ob vielleicht Olivier nicht ganz frei von jenem Jähzorn sei, der oft wie ein blinder Wahnsinn die gutmütigsten Menschen überfällt und zu Taten verleitet, die alle Willkür des Handelns auszuschließen scheinen. Doch je begeisterter Madelon von dem ruhigen häuslichen Glück sprach, in dem die drei Menschen in innigster Liebe verbunden lebten, desto mehr verschwand jeder Schatten des Verdachts wider den auf den Tod angeklagten Olivier. Genau alles prüfend, davon ausgehend, daß Olivier unerachtet alles dessen, was laut für seine Unschuld spräche, dennoch Cardillacs Mörder gewesen, fand die Scuderi im Reich der Möglichkeit keinen Beweggrund zu der entsetzlichen Tat, die in jedem Fall Oliviers Glück zerstören mußte. – "Er ist arm, aber geschickt. – Es gelingt ihm, die Zuneigung des berühmtesten Meisters zu gewinnen, er liebt die Tochter, der Meister begünstigt seine Liebe, Glück, Wohlstand für sein ganzes Leben wird ihm erschlossen! – Sei es aber nun, daß, Gott weiß, auf welche Weise gereizt, Olivier vom Zorn übermannt, seinen Wohltäter, seinen Vater mörderisch anfiel, welche teuflische Heuchelei gehört dazu, nach der Tat sich so zu betragen, als es wirklich geschah!" – Mit der festen Überzeugung von Oliviers Unschuld faßte die Scuderi den Entschluß, den unschuldigen Jüngling zu retten, koste es, was es wolle.
Es schien ihr, ehe sie die Huld des Königs selbst vielleicht anrufe, am geratensten, sich an den Präsidenten la Regnie zu wenden, ihn auf alle Umstände, die für Oliviers Unschuld sprechen mußten, aufmerksam zu machen und so vielleicht in des Präsidenten Seele eine innere, dem Angeklagten günstige Überzeugung zu erwecken, die sich wohltätig den Richtern mitteilen sollte.
La Regnie empfing die Scuderi mit der hohen Achtung, auf die die würdige Dame, von dem Könige selbst hoch geehrt, gerechten Anspruch machen konnte. Er hörte ruhig alles an, was sie über die entsetzliche Tat, über Oliviers Verhältnisse, über seinen Charakter vorbrachte. Ein feines, beinahe hämisches Lächeln war indessen alles, womit er bewies, daß die Beteurungen, die von häufigen Tränen begleiteten Ermahnungen, wie jeder Richter nicht der Feind des Angeklagten sein, sondern auch auf alles achten müsse, was zu seinen Gunsten spräche, nicht an gänzlich tauben Ohren vorüberglitten. Als das Fräulein nun endlich ganz erschöpft, die Tränen von den Augen wegtrocknend, schwieg, fing la Regnie an: "Es ist ganz Eures vortrefflichen Herzens würdig, mein Fräulein, daß Ihr, gerührt von den Tränen eines jungen, verliebten Mädchens, alles glaubt, was sie vorbringt, ja, daß Ihr nicht fähig seid, den Gedanken einer entsetzlichen Untat zu fassen, aber anders ist es mit dem Richter, der gewohnt ist, frecher Heuchelei die Larve abzureißen. Wohl mag es nicht meines Amts sein, jedem, der mich frägt, den Gang eines Kriminalprozesses zu entwickeln. Fräulein! ich tue meine Pflicht, wenig kümmert mich das Urteil der Welt. Zittern sollen die Bösewichter vor der Chambre ardente, die keine Strafe kennt als Blut und Feuer. Aber vor Euch, mein würdiges Fräulein, möcht ich nicht für ein Ungeheuer gehalten werden an Härte und Grausamkeit, darum vergönnt mir, daß ich Euch mit wenigen Worten die Blutschuld des jungen Bösewichts, der, dem Himmel sei es gedankt! der Rache verfallen ist, klar vor Augen lege. Euer scharfsinniger Geist wird dann selbst die Gutmütigkeit verschmähen, die Euch Ehre macht, mir aber gar nicht anstehen würde. – Also! – Am Morgen wird René Cardillac durch einen Dolchstoß ermordet gefunden. Niemand ist bei ihm, als sein Geselle Olivier Brusson und die Tochter. In Oliviers Kammer, unter andern, findet man einen Dolch von frischem Blute gefärbt, der genau in die Wunde paßt. 'Cardillac ist', spricht Olivier, 'in der Nacht vor meinen Augen niedergestoßen worden.' – 'Man wollte ihn berauben?' 'Das weiß ich nicht!' – 'Du gingst mit ihm, und es war dir nicht möglich, dem Mörder zu wehren? – ihn festzuhalten? um Hilfe zu rufen?' 'Funfzehn, wohl zwanzig Schritte vor mir ging der Meister, ich folgte ihm.' 'Warum in aller Welt so entfernt?' – 'Der Meister wollt' es so.' 'Was hatte überhaupt Meister Cardillac so spät auf der Straße zu tun?' – 'Das kann ich nicht sagen.' 'Sonst ist er aber doch niemals nach neun Uhr abends aus dem Hause gekommen?' – Hier stockt Olivier, er ist bestürzt, er seufzt, er vergießt Tränen, er beteuert bei allem, was heilig, daß Cardillac wirklich in jener Nacht ausgegangen sei und seinen Tod gefunden habe. Nun merkt aber wohl auf, mein Fräulein. Erwiesen ist es bis zur vollkommensten Gewißheit, daß Cardillac in jener Nacht das Haus nicht verließ, mithin ist Oliviers Behauptung, er sei mit ihm wirklich ausgegangen, eine freche Lüge. Die Haustüre ist mit einem schweren Schloß versehen, welches bei dem Auf- und Zuschließen ein durchdringendes Geräusch macht, dann aber bewegt sich der Türflügel, widrig knarrend und heulend, in den Angeln, so daß, wie es angestellte Versuche bewährt haben, selbst im obersten Stock des Hauses das Getöse widerhallt. Nun wohnt in dem untersten Stock, also dicht neben der Haustüre, der alte Meister Claude Patru mit seiner Aufwärterin, einer Person von beinahe achtzig Jahren, aber noch munter und rührig. Diese beiden Personen hörten, wie Cardillac nach seiner gewöhnlichen Weise an jenem Abend Punkt neun Uhr die Treppe hinabkam, die Türe mit vielem Geräusch verschloß und verrammelte, dann wieder hinaufstieg, den Abendsegen laut las und dann, wie man es an dem Zuschlagen der Türe vernehmen konnte, in sein Schlafzimmer ging. Meister Claude leidet an Schlaflosigkeit, wie es alten Leuten wohl zu gehen pflegt. Auch in jener Nacht konnte er kein Auge zutun. Die Aufwärterin schlug daher, es mochte halb zehn Uhr sein, in der Küche, in die sie, über den Hausflur gehend, gelangt, Licht an und setzte sich zum Meister Claude an den Tisch mit einer alten Chronik, in der sie las, während der Alte, seinen Gedanken nachhängend, bald sich in den Lehnstuhl setzte, bald wieder aufstand und, um Müdigkeit und Schlaf zu gewinnen, im Zimmer leise und langsam auf und ab schritt. Es blieb alles still und ruhig bis nach Mitternacht. Da hörte sie über sich scharfe Tritte, einen harten Fall, als stürze eine schwere Last zu Boden und gleich darauf ein dumpfes Stöhnen. In beide kam eine seltsame Angst und Beklommenheit. Die Schauer der entsetzlichen Tat, die eben begangen, gingen bei ihnen vorüber. – Mit dem hellen Morgen trat dann ans Licht, was in der Finsternis begonnen." "Aber", fiel die Scuderi ein, "aber um aller Heiligen willen, könnt Ihr bei allen Umständen, die ich erst weitläuftig erzählte, Euch denn irgendeinen Anlaß zu dieser Tat der Hölle denken?" – "Hm", erwiderte la Regnie, "Cardillac war nicht arm – im Besitz vortrefflicher Steine." "Bekam", fuhr die Scuderi fort, "bekam denn nicht alles die Tochter? – Ihr vergeßt, daß Olivier Cardillacs Schwiegersohn werden sollte." "Er mußte vielleicht teilen oder gar nur für andere morden", sprach la Regnie. "Teilen, für andere morden?" fragte die Scuderi in vollem Erstaunen. "Wißt", fuhr der Präsident fort, "wißt mein Fräulein, daß Olivier schon längst geblutet hätte auf dem Greveplatz, stünde seine Tat nicht in Beziehung mit dem dicht verschleierten Geheimnis, das bisher so bedrohlich über ganz Paris wartete. Olivier gehört offenbar zu jener verruchten Bande, die, alle Aufmerksamkeit, alle Mühe, alles Forschen der Gerichtshöfe verspottend, ihre Streiche sicher und ungestraft zu führen wußte. Durch ihn wird – muß alles klarwerden. Die Wunde Cardillacs ist denen ganz ähnlich, die alle auf der Straße, in den Häusern Ermordete und Beraubte trugen. Dann aber das Entscheidendste, seit der Zeit, daß Olivier Brusson verhaftet ist, haben alle Mordtaten, alle Beraubungen aufgehört. Sicher sind die Straßen zur Nachtzeit wie am Tage. Beweis genug, daß Olivier vielleicht an der Spitze jener Mordbande stand. Noch will er nicht bekennen, aber es gibt Mittel, ihn sprechen zu machen wider seinen Willen." "Und Madelon", rief die Scuderi, "und Madelon, die treue, unschuldige Taube." – "Ei", sprach la Regnie mit einem giftigen Lächeln, "ei, wer steht mir dafür, daß sie nicht mit im Komplott ist. Was ist ihr an dem Vater gelegen, nur dem Mordbuben gelten ihre Tränen." "Was sagt Ihr", schrie die Scuderi, "es ist nicht möglich; den Vater! dieses Mädchen!" – "Oh!" fuhr la Regnie fort, "oh! denkt doch nur an die Brinvillier! Ihr möget es mir verzeihen, wenn ich mich vielleicht bald genötigt sehe, Euch Euern Schützling zu entreißen und in die Conciergerie werfen zu lassen." – Der Scuderi ging ein Grausen an bei diesem entsetzlichen Verdacht. Es war ihr, als könne vor diesem schrecklichen Manne keine Treue, keine Tugend bestehen, als spähe er in den tiefsten, geheimsten Gedanken Mord und Blutschuld. Sie stand auf. "Seid menschlich", das war alles, was sie beklommen, mühsam atmend hervorbringen konnte. Schon im Begriff, die Treppe hinabzusteigen, bis zu der der Präsident sie mit zeremoniöser Artigkeit begleitet hatte, kam ihr, selbst wußte sie nicht wie, ein seltsamer Gedanke. "Würd' es mir wohl erlaubt sein, den unglücklichen Olivier Brusson zu sehen?" So fragte sie den Präsidenten, sich rasch umwendend. Dieser schaute sie mit bedenklicher Miene an, dann verzog sich sein Gesicht in jenes widrige Lächeln, das ihm eigen. "Gewiß", sprach er, "gewiß wollt Ihr nun, mein würdiges Fräulein, Euerm Gefühl, der innern Stimme mehr vertrauend, als dem, was vor unsern Augen geschehen, selbst Oliviers Schuld oder Unschuld prüfen. Scheut Ihr nicht den düstern Aufenthalt des Verbrechens, ist es Euch nicht gehässig, die Bilder der Verworfenheit in allen Abstufungen zu sehen, so sollen für Euch in zwei Stunden die Tore der Conciergerie offen sein. Man wird Euch diesen Olivier, dessen Sdlicksal Eure Teilnahme erregt, vorstellen."
In der Tat konnte sich die Scuderi von der Schuld des jungen Menschen nicht überzeugen. Alles sprach wider ihn, ja, kein Richter in der Welt hätte anders gehandelt, wie la Regnie, bei solch entscheidenden Tatsachen. Aber das Bild häuslichen Glücks, wie es Madelon mit den lebendigsten Zügen der Scuderi vor Augen gestellt, überstrahlte jeden bösen Verdacht, und so mochte sie lieber ein unerklärliches Geheimnis annehmen, als daran glauben, wogegen ihr ganzes Inneres sich empörte.
Sie gedachte, sich von Olivier noch einmal alles, wie es sich in jener verhängnisvollen Nacht begeben, erzählen zu lassen und, soviel möglich, in ein Geheimnis zu dringen, das vielleicht den Richtern verschlossen geblieben, weil es wertlos schien, sich weiter darum zu bekümmern.