de-en  Oscar Wilde: Märchen - Der junge König Medium
The Young King.
It was the evening before his coronation day, and the young king sat alone in his fair chamber. His courtiers had all bid him farewell by bowing their heads all the way to the ground according to the solemn custom of the day and were now gathered in the great hall of the palace to receive a few final instructions from the professor of polite behavior. For there were some among them who still displayed completely natural behavior, which is a very serious offence for a courtier, it is hardly necessary to mention it.

The young man - for he was but a young man since he was only sixteen years old - did not worry about their departure. With a deep sigh of relief, he had thrown himself back onto the soft pillows of his embroidered bed and lay there with wild eyes and mouth open, like a brown forest faun or a young animal from the forest that had been caught by a hair in the snares of the hunters.

And they were in fact hunters who had found him, who had come across him almost by chance, when he, barefoot, with a flute in his hand, followed the flock of the poor goatherd who had raised him and for whose son he had always considered himself. But he originated from a secret marriage of the old king's only daughter with a man who was far below her - a stranger, as some said, who had captured the young princess's love by the wonderful enchantment of his lute playing, while others spoke of an artist from Rimini, to whom the princess had honored much, perhaps too much and who had suddenly disappeared from the city without having completed his work in the cathedral. When he was barely a week old, the child was stolen from his sleeping mother's side and given to a simple peasant and his wife, who had no children of their own and lived in the remotest part of the forest, more than a day's ride from the city. Grief or the plague, as the court physician diagnosed, or as some believed, a fast-acting Italian poison administered in a cup of spiced wine, killed the gentle girl who had given birth to him within an hour of his awakening, and when the faithful messenger carrying the child on the arch of his saddle descended from his tired horse and knocked on the rough door of the goatherd's hut, the princess's body was being lowered into an open grave dug in an abandoned cemetery on the other side of the city walls, into a grave which was said to have already contained another corpse, that of a young man of wonderful and exotic beauty, whose hands had been tied together behind his back with interlaced cords, and whose chest showed many red stab wounds.

At least that was the story that people whispered to each other. And it was certain that the old king, as he lay on his deathbed, either out of repentance for his great sin or simply because he did not want the kingdom to fall to another line of succession, had sent for the young man and acknowledged him as his heir in the presence of his council of state.

And it seems that from the first moment of his recognition, he had shown characteristics of that strange passion for beauty that was destined to have such a great influence on his life. Those who accompanied him to the suite of rooms, which had been chosen for his use, often spoke of the cry of joy that emanated from his lips when he saw the fine garments and the rich jewels which were held in readiness for him, and the almost wild abandonment with which he flung the coarse leather tunic and the rough sheepskin coat off himself. Indeed, he sometimes missed the beautiful freedom of his forest life and was always inclined to get annoyed at the boring court ceremonies which took so much of every day away from him, but the wonderful palace - the joyful one they called it - in whose possession he now knew himself, seemed to him like a new world created especially for his delight. And as soon as he could escape from the council meeting or the audience room, he ran down the great staircase with its gilded bronze lions and its steps of gleaming porphyry and wandered from room to room and from hallway to hallway, like someone who seeks a cure for pain in beauty, a recovery from infirmity.

On these journeys of discovery, as he probably called them - and for him they were true voyages through a marvelous land - he was often accompanied by slender, blonde-haired court pages with their flapping coats and amusing fluttering ribbons. But much more often he was alone, for with a quick, sure instinct, almost a revelation, he felt that the secrets of art can only be learned in secret, and that beauty, like wisdom, loves the lone admirer.

Many strange stories were told about him around this time. It was said that a worthy mayor, who had come to present a memorandum decorated with flowery phrases for the citizens of the city, had seen him kneel in real worship before a great painting which had just been brought from Venice, and which seemed to proclaim the service of some new gods. Another time he was missed for several hours, and after a lengthy search he was found in a small chamber in one of the north towers of the palace, staring enchantedly at a Greek cameo into which the figure of Adonis was cut. Furthermore, it had been observed how he pressed his warm lips to the marble forehead of an ancient statue found in the riverbed when building a stone bridge and bearing the name of a Bithynian slave of Hadrian. And he spent a whole night observing the impression the moonlight made on a silver statue of Endymion.

In any case, all rare and precious objects cast a strong spell on him, and in his desire to obtain them, he had sent out many merchants, some to trade meerschaum from the coarse fisherfolk of the North Sea, others to search for those strange green turquoises in Egypt, which one finds only in the tombs of kings, and which are said to possess magical properties. Still others had to travel to Persia for silk carpets and painted pottery or to India to buy pile fabrics and colorful ivory, moonstones and bracelets of agate, sandalwood and blue enamel and scarves of soft wool.

But what occupied him the most was the garment he was to wear at his coronation, the woven gold dress, the crown decorated with rubies, and the scepter with its wreaths and rows of pearls. And that evening, too, he thought of it as he lay on his opulent bed, looking at the large block of fir wood that was slowly burning in the open fireplace. The designs from the hands of the most famous artists had already been presented to him many months ago, and he had given orders that the craftsmen should work day and night to execute them, and that the whole world was to be searched for jewels worthy of this work. In his mind he already saw himself standing in the radiant robe of a king in front of the high altar of the cathedral, and a smile lingered on his young lips and sparked radiant brilliance in his dark forest eyes.

After some time he rose from his camp, leaned against the carved border of the fireplace and looked around the dull-lit room. The walls were decorated with rich tapestries that showed the triumph of beauty. A large cupboard lined with agate and lapis lazuli took up one corner, and opposite the window stood a strangely crafted jewel cupboard with lacquer paneling of powdered gold and gold mosaic, upon which stood several precious Venetian glass jugs and a cup of dark veined onyx. The silk duvet was embroidered with pale poppies as if they had escaped the tired hand of sleep, and slender reeds made of grooved ivory supported the velvet canopy, from which large clusters of ostrich feathers leapt up like white foam to the pale silver of the latticed ceiling. A laughing narcissist in green bronze held a polished mirror over his head. On the table was a shallow bowl of amethyst.

Outside one could see the high building of the cathedral, which rose like a illusory structure over the houses immersed in its shadows, and the tired sentinels, who were walking up and down on the misty terrace by the river. Far away sang a nightingale in an orchard. A soft jasmine scent came through the open window. He brushed his brown curls from his forehead, took a lute and slipped his fingerd over the strings. His heavy eyelids sank and a strange weariness ivercame him. Never before he had felt the magic and the secret of beautiful things so strongly or with such a delicious joy.

When it struck midnight from the bell tower, he rang and his pages entered and undressed him with great solemnity by pouring rose water over his hands and strewing flowers on his pillow. A few minutes after they had left the room he fell asleep.

And when he slept, he dreamt, and this was his dream: he thought he was standing in a long, low attic room amidst the buzzing and rattling of many looms. A meager amount of daylight penetrated through the barred windows and showed him the gaunt figures of the weavers leaning over their boxes. Pale, ill-looking children crawled over the heavy crossbeams. When the shuttle shot through the warp, they lifted up the heavy battens, and when the shuttle stopped, they let the battens fall and pressed the threads together. Their faces were sunken due to lack of food, and their thin hands trembled and quaked. Some haggard women sat at a table and were sewing. A terrible smell impregnated the room. The air was spoiled and oppressive, and the walls dropped and streamed with moisture.

The young king stepped to one of the weavers, stopped by him and watched him.

But the weaver looked at him angrily and said: "Why are you watching me?" Are you a spy our master has put on us?" "Who is your master?" asked the young king.

"Our master?" shouted the weaver embittered. "He is a man just like me. There is in fact only one difference between us, namely that he wears fine clothes, and I go in rags, and that while I am miserable with hunger, he suffers not a little by eating too much!" "The land is free," said the young king, "and you are not a man's slave." "In war," replied the weaver, "the strong man makes slaves of the weak, and in peace the rich man makes slaves of the poor. We have to work to live, and they give us such low wages that we die. All day we labour for them, and they hoard the gold in their treasure chambers. Our children are wasting away before their time, and the faces of those we love become hard and ugly. We press the grapes, and the others drink the wine. We sow the corn, and our own table is empty. We are wearing chains even though nobody sees them, and we are slaves, though people call us free." "Is that true for all?"

"It's like that with everyone," replied the weaver, "with the boys as well as the elders, with women as well as men, with small children as well as the aged. The merchants slave-drive us, and we have to obey out of necessity. The priest is driving by and praying his rosary, and no one cares about us. Poverty creeps through our dark alleyways with its hungry eyes, and vice with its swollen face follows on its heels. Misery wakes us up in the morning, and shame sits with us in the evening. But what are these things for you? You are not one of us. Your face is too happy." And he turned away darkly from him and threw the shuttle into the loom, and the king saw that it was filled with golden threads.

Then he was overcome with horror and asked the weaver: "What is this garment that you are weaving? "It is the coronation dress of the young king," he replied; "why do you care about it? And the young king gave a loud cry, and woke, and behold, he was in his own room, and through the window he saw the great honey-colored moon hanging in the dark sky.

And he went back to sleep again and dreamed, and this was his dream: he thought he was lying on the deck of a huge galley, which was rowed by one hundred slaves. On a carpet next to him sat the master of the galley. He was as black as ebony, and his turban was of red silk. Big silver earrings were pulling down his thick ear lobes, and in his hand he had an ivory scale.

The slaves were naked except for a ragged loincloth, and everyone was chained together with his neighbor. The hot sun burned down brightly on them, and the Negroes ran up and down the corridor and hit them with a cowhide whip. The slaves thrust out their skinny arms and pulled the heavy oars through the water. The salty foam was flowing from the oar blades.

Finally they reached a small bay and began to sound the depth. A breeze blew from the shore and covered the upper deck and the big lateen sail with its red dust. Three Arabs on wild donkeys approached and threw spears at them. The master of the galley took his painted bow and shot one of them through the throat. He fell heavily into the surf and his companions galopped off. A woman wrapped in a yellow veil followed slowly on a camel, looking around for the dead from time to time.

As soon as they dropped anchors and pulled in the sail, the Negroes went below deck and pulled up a long rope ladder, heavily loaded with lead. The master of the galley threw it overboard and fastened the ends on two iron posts. Then the Negroes seized the youngest of the slaves, cut off his chains, filled his nostrils and his ears with wax and attached a heavy stone to his body. Tired he crawled down the ladder and disappeared into the sea. A few bubbles rose, where he sank. Some of the other slaves looked curiously over the side of the ship. At the bow of the galley a shark conjuror sat and beat monotonously on a drum. After some time the diver came up out of the water and hung wheezing on the ladder with a pearl in his right hand The Negroes snatched it from him and pushed him down again. The slaves fell asleep at their oars.

Again and again he appeared, and each time he brought up a beautiful pearl. The master of the galley weighed it and put it in a small green leather bag.

The young king tried to speak, but his tongue seemed to be glued to his palate, and his lips refused to work. The Negroes chatted with each other and started wrangling over a string of shiny pearls. Two cranes circled around the ship.

Then the diver came up the last time, and the pearl, which he brought with him, was more beautiful than all the pearls of Ormuzd, for it was shaped like the full moon and whiter than the morning star. But the slave's face turned strangely pale, and when he fell on the deck, blood poured out of his nose and ears. He still quavered for a while, then he was quiet. The Negroes shrugged and threw the body overboard.

But the master of the galley laughed. He stretched out his hand, took the pearl, and when he saw it, he pressed it against his forehead and bowed to it. "It shall be for the scepter of the young king," he said and motioned the Negroes to weigh anchor.

But when the young king heard this, he let out a loud yell and awoke. And through the window he saw th long great fingers of dawn reach for the vanishing stars.

And he fell asleep again und dreamed, and this was his dream: He believed, he was wandering through a dark grove covered with strange fruits and beautiful poisonous flowers. The vipers hissed at him, when he was passing by, and the coloured parrots flew screamiing from branch to branch. Huge turtles lay asleep on the hot mud. The trees were full of monkeys and peacocks.

He went on and on through the woods until he reached the edge, and there he saw an immense crowd of people working in the bed of a dry river. They swarmed up the cliffs like ants. They dug deep holes into the ground and descended into them. Some smashed the rocks with heavy picks, others padded around in the sand. They tore out the cactus with its roots and trampled its scarlet flowers. They were hurrying about, calling out to each other, and nobody was idle.

From the darkness of a cave they watched Death and Greed, and Death said, "I am tired; give me a third of them and let me go on." But Greed shook its head. "They are my servants," they answered.

And Death asked her, "What have you got in your hand?" "I have three grains," she said; "what is that to you?" "Give me one of them," Death cried, "I will plant it in my garden; only one, and I will go away." "I will not give you anything," said Greed and put her hand into the folds of her garment.

But Death laughed. He took a cup, dipped it in a puddle of water and out of the cup came a shivering. It walked through the large crowd and a third lay dead there. A cold mist followed him, and the water snakes ran at his side.

Now when Greed saw that a third of the crowd was dead, she struck her chest and wept. She beat her withered breast and screamed loudly. ... "You have slain a third of my servants," she cried, "go away. There is war in the mountains of Tartary and the kings of both camps are calling for you. The Afghans have slaughtered the black bull and march into the battle. They struck the shields with their spears and put on their iron helmets. What can my valley be to you, that you stay in it? Go your way and never come here again." "No," Death said, "as long as you have not given me a seed, I will not leave." But Greed closed her hand and clenched her teeth. "I don't want to give you anything," she grumbled.

And Death laughed and took a black stone. ... He threw it into the forest, and out of a thicket of wild hemlocks came a fever in a flaming dress. ... It passed through the crowd and touched them, and every man it touched died. The grass withered under his feet where it went.

And Greed shuddered and scattered ashes on her head. ... "You are cruel," she cried; "you are cruel. In the fortified cities of India there is famine, and the wells of Samarkand have dried up. There is famine in the fortified cities of Egypt, and grasshoppers have come out of the desert. The Nile has not flooded its banks, and the priests have cursed Isis and Osiris. Go to those who need you and leave my servants alone." "No," Death said, " as long as you have not given me a seed, I will not go away.. "I don't want to give you anything," said Greed.

But Death laughed again. He whistles through his fingers, and a woman came flying through the air. Plague was written on her forehead, and a swarm of lean vultures hovered around her. She covered the valley with her wings, and no man remained alive.

Then Greed fled screaming through the forest, but Death rose on his red horse and rode off, and he rode faster than the wind.

And out of the mud that covered the bottom of the valley crawled dragons and ugly beasts with scales, and jackals came trotting over the sand and sniffed the air with their nostrils.

Then the young king wept and said, "Who were these people and what were they looking for? "They were looking for rubies for a king's crown," replied someone standing behind him.

And the young king leaped up. He turned around and saw a man in a pilgrim's robe holding a silver mirror in his hand.

Then he turned pale and asked, "For which king?" And the pilgrim answered, "Look in this mirror, and you will see him." The king looked into the mirror, and when he saw his own face, he uttered a loud cry and awoke. The bright sunlight streamed into the room and the birds sang from the trees of his park and pleasure garden.

And the chamberlain and high officials came in and bowed before him. The pages brought him the gold embroidered robe and laid the crown and scepter before him.

And the young king looked at everything, and it was beautiful. It was more beautiful than anything he had ever seen. But he remembered his dream and said to his nobles, "Take these things away, for I will not wear them." And the courtiers were astonished, and some laughed, for they thought he was joking.

But he again spoke seriously to them and said: "Take away these things, that I may not see them. Even though it is my coronation day, I will not wear them, for the loom of tribulation and the hands of suffering have woven this, my garment. Blood is in the heart of the ruby, and death in the heart of the pearl." And he told them his three dreams.

And when the courtiers heard this, they looked at each other and whispered to each other: "Surely, he is mad; for what is a dream other than a dream, and an apparition other than an apparition? They're not real things to consider. And what do we care about lives of those who work for us? Shall a man not eat bread before he has spoken to the sower, drink wine before he has seen the winegrower?" And the lord of the chamber addressed the young king and said: "My lord, I pray thee, erase these gloomy thoughts from your mind, put on this beautiful garment and put the crown on your head. For how shall the people know that you are king if you do not wear the robes of a king?" And the young king looked at him, "Is that really so? he asked. "Won't they recognize me as king if I don't wear a royal dress?" "They will not know you, my lord," the chamberlain cried.

"I had believed that there had been royal people before," he replied, "but it may be as you say. But I will not wear this garment, nor will I be crowned with this crown, but as I came into the palace, I will go out of it." And he asked everyone to leave him, with the exception of a page, whom he kept with him, a young man who was one year younger than himself. He kept him for his service, and when he had bathed himself in clear water, he opened a large painted chest and pulled out the leather jacket and the rough sheep's clothing he had worn as he grazed the shaggy goats of his goat herd on the hillside.

And the small page opened his blue eyes in amazement and said to him with a smile: "My lord, I see your robe and your scepter, but where is your crown? And the young king tore off a branch of a wild rose bush, which was growing over the balcony. He bent it and made a wreath out of it, which he put on his head.

"This shall be my crown," he replied.

And so, clothed, he stepped out of his chamber into the great hall, where the nobles were waiting for him.

But the nobles laughed, and some called to him, "Lord, the people are waiting for their king, but you are showing them a beggar." Others were angry and said: "He brings shame on the state and is unworthy to be our ruler". However, he did not answer them a word, but went on. He went down the gleaming porphyry steps and through the bronze gates, he got on his horse and rode to the cathedral while the little page ran alongside him.

And the people laughed and said, "It is the king's fool who is riding here," and they scoffed at him.

Then he stopped his horse and said, "You are mistaken, I am the king." And he told them his three dreams.

Then a man stepped out of the crowd. He spoke bitter words and said: "Lord, do you not know that from the luxury of the rich comes the life of the poor? Through your wastefulness we are nourished, and your depravity gives us bread. Working for a hard master is bitter, but it is even bitterer not to have a master to work for. Do you think the ravens will feed us? And how are you going to make these things better? Would you say to the builder: "you are to build at such a price" and to the trader, "you are to sell at such a price?" I hope not. Therefore, return to your palace and put purple and delicate linen on. What do you have to do with us and with what we suffer?" "Are not the poor and the rich brothers?" asked the young king.

"Yes, " the man answered, "and the rich brother's name is Cain." Here the young king's eyes filled with tears, and he continued riding through the grumbling crowd, and the small page was afraid and deserted him.

And when he reached the great cathedral portal, the soldiers stretched out their halberds and said, "What are you looking for here? No one is allowed to enter through this gate except for the King." Here the King's face turned red with anger and he said to them: "I am the King." Then he pushed their halberds aside and entered.

When the old bishop saw him coming in his goatherd's clothes, he rose in astonishment from his chair, approached him and said to him, "My son, is this the costume of a king? And what crown shall I crown thee with, and what sceptre shall I put in thy hand? Surely this is a day of joy for you and not a day of humiliation?" "Can joy adorn itself with what suffering has created?" asked the young king, and he told him his three dreams.

When the bishop heard them, he wrinkled his brow and said, "My son, I am an old man and at the end of my days. I know that much evil happens in the wide world. The wild robbers come down from the mountains, steal the little children and sell them to the blacks. The lions lie in wait for the caravans and throw themselves at the camels. The wild boar devastates the grain in the valley, and the foxes devour the grapevines on the hill. The pirates were pillaging and threatening the seashore, were burning the fishermen's ships and were robbing their nets. In the salt marshes live the lepers; they have huts of wicker reed, and no one should come near them. The beggars wander through the cities and eat their food with the dogs. Can you make it that things are not like this? Would you take the leper as your bedfellow and ask the beggar to sit at your table? Do you want the lion to follow your request and the wild boar to obey you? Was it not God who made misery more blessed than you are? Therefore, I am not praising you for what you have done but ask you to go back to the palace, brighten up your face and put on the robe that befits a king. Then I will crown you with the golden crown and put the pearl sceptre in your hand. But concerning your dreams, don't think about them anymore. The burden of this world is too heavy for one man to bear, and the suffering of the world is too great for one heart to endure." "The young king asked, "Are you speaking like this in this house?" and he walked past the bishop, climbed the steps to the altar and stood before the image of Christ.

He stood before the image of Christ, and to his right and left were the wonderful golden vessels, the cup with the yellow wine and the bottle with the holy oil. He knelt down before the image of Christ, and the large candles burned brightly beside the jewel-decorated shrine, and the smoke of incense drifted through the cathedral in thin blue clouds. He bowed his head in prayer, and the priests in their stiffened choir skirts withdrew from the altar.

Then suddenly wild rioting could be heard from the street. The knights entered with drawn swords, nodding panaches and bucklers of polished steel. "Where is the dreamer of dreams?" they shouted. "Where is this king who dresses like a beggar - this boy who disgraces the realm? Truly, we will slay him for he is not worthy to rule us." And the young king bowed his head once again and prayed, and when he had finished his prayer, he rose, turned around and looked at them sadly.

Lo and behold! Through the colorful windows sunlight streamed over him, and the rays of sunshine wove a golden robe around him that was more precious than the robe that had been made for his pleasure. The dead staff flowered and bore lilies whiter than pearls. The withered thorn tendril flowered and bore roses, which were redder than rubies. The lilies were whiter than real pearls, and their stalks were of shining silver. The roses were redder than precious rubies and their leaves were of gold.

He stood there in the robe of a king, and the doors of the jewel-decorated shrine flew open, and from the crystal of the multi-beam monstrance shone a wonderful and mysterious light. He stood there in the robe of a king, and the glory of God filled the room, and the saints in their carved niches seemed to move. He stood before them in the radiant robe of a king, and the organ roared with music, the trumpeters blew their trumpets, and the boys' choir began to sing. And the people fell shyly to their knees, and the knights put away their swords and worshipped him, and the face of the bishop became pale, and his hands were trembling. "A higher man than I am has crowned you," he cried and knelt before him.

And the young king stepped down from the high altar and walked home through the middle of the people. But no one dared to look into his face for it was the face of an angel.
unit 1
Der junge König.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 2
unit 11
So wenigstens lautete die Geschichte, die sich die Menschen zuflüsterten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 19
Viele seltsame Geschichten wurden um diese Zeit über ihn berichtet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 31
Die Wände waren mit reichen Gobelins behangen, die den Triumph der Schönheit darstellten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 34
Ein lachender Narziß in grüner Bronze hielt einen polierten Spiegel über seinen Kopf.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 35
Auf dem Tisch stand eine flache Schüssel aus Amethyst.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 37
Weit entfernt sang eine Nachtigall in einem Obstgarten.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 38
Ein leiser Jasminduft kam durch das offne Fenster.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 40
Seine schweren Augenlider sanken, und eine seltsame Erschlaffung überkam ihn.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 43
Wenige Minuten, nachdem sie das Zimmer verlassen hatten, schlief er ein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 46
Bleiche, krank aussehende Kinder krochen über die schweren Querbalken.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 48
Ihre Gesichter waren eingefallen vom Nahrungsmangel, und ihre dünnen Hände bebten und zitterten.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 49
Einige abgehärmte Frauen saßen an einem Tisch und nähten.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 50
Ein schrecklicher Geruch erfüllte den Raum.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 51
Die Luft war verdorben und drückend, und die Wände tropften und strömten von Feuchtigkeit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 52
Der junge König trat zu einem der Weber hin, blieb bei ihm stehen und beobachtete ihn.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 53
Aber der Weber blickte ihn ärgerlich an und sagte: »Warum beobachtest du mich?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 55
»Unser Meister?« rief der Weber bitter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 56
»Er ist ein Mann, wie ich auch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 58
Wir müssen arbeiten, um zu leben, und sie geben uns so niedrige Löhne, daß wir sterben.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 59
Den ganzen Tag über quälen wir uns für sie ab, und sie sammeln das Gold in ihren Schatzkammern.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 61
Wir keltern die Trauben, und die andern trinken den Wein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 62
Wir säen das Korn, und unser eigener Tisch ist leer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 65
Die Kaufleute schinden uns, und wir müssen aus Not ihren Befehlen gehorchen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 66
Der Priester fährt vorüber und betet seinen Rosenkranz, und niemand kümmert sich um uns.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 68
Elend weckt uns auf am Morgen, und Schande sitzt bei uns am Abend.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 69
Aber was sind diese Dinge für dich?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 70
Du bist keiner von uns.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 74
Auf einem Teppich neben ihm saß der Herr der Galeere.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 75
Er war schwarz wie Ebenholz, und sein Turban war von roter Seide.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 79
Die Sklaven streckten ihre mageren Arme aus und zogen die schweren Ruder durch das Wasser.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 80
Der salzige Schaum floß von den Schaufeln.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 81
Schließlich erreichten sie eine kleine Bucht und begannen zu loten.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 83
Drei Araber, die auf wilden Eseln saßen, ritten hervor und warfen Speere nach ihnen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 84
unit 85
Er fiel schwer in die Brandung, und seine Gefährten galoppierten davon.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 88
Der Herr der Galeere warf sie über Bord und befestigte die Enden an zwei eisernen Pfosten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 90
Müde kroch er die Leiter hinab und verschwand in der See.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 91
Ein paar Blasen stiegen auf, wo er versank.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 92
Einige von den andern Sklaven blickten neugierig über die Bordseite.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 93
Am Bug der Galeere saß ein Haifischbeschwörer und schlug einförmig auf eine Trommel.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 95
Die Neger entrissen sie ihm und stießen ihn wieder hinab.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 96
Die Sklaven schliefen an ihren Rudern ein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 97
Wieder und wieder tauchte er auf, und jedesmal brachte er eine schöne Perle empor.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 98
Der Herr der Galeere wog sie und steckte sie in eine kleine Tasche aus grünem Leder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 100
Die Neger schwatzten miteinander und begannen über eine Schnur glänzender Perlen zu streiten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 101
Zwei Kraniche flogen im Kreise um das Schiff.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 104
Er bebte noch eine Weile, dann war er still.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 105
Die Neger zuckten ihre Achseln und warfen die Leiche über Bord.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 106
Aber der Herr der Galeere lachte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 109
Doch als der junge König dies hörte, stieß er einen lauten Schrei aus und erwachte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 113
Riesige Schildkröten lagen schlafend auf dem heißen Schlamm.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 114
Die Bäume waren voll von Affen und Pfauen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 116
Sie schwärmten die Klippen herauf wie Ameisen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 117
Sie gruben tiefe Löcher in den Grund und stiegen in sie hinab.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 118
Einige zerschlugen die Felsen mit schweren Hacken, andere tappten im Sand umher.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 119
Sie rissen den Kaktus mit den Wurzeln heraus und zertraten seine scharlachroten Blüten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 120
Sie eilten umher, riefen sich zu, und keiner war müßig.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 122
»Sie sind meine Diener,« antwortete sie.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 124
Aber der Tod lachte.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 125
unit 126
Der schritt durch die große Menge, und ein Drittel lag tot da.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 127
Ein kalter Nebel folgte ihm, und die Wasserschlangen liefen ihm zur Seite.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 129
Sie schlug ihren dürren Busen und schrie laut.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 130
»Ein Drittel meiner Diener hast du erschlagen,« rief sie, »mach dich fort.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 131
Es ist Krieg in den Bergen der Tatarei und die Könige beider Lager rufen nach dir.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 132
Die Afghanen haben den schwarzen Stier geschlachtet und marschieren in die Schlacht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 133
Sie haben mit ihren Speeren auf die Schilder geschlagen und ihre eisernen Helme aufgesetzt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 134
Was kann dir mein Tal sein, daß du dich darin aufhältst?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 136
»Ich will dir gar nichts geben,« murrte sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 137
Und der Tod lachte und nahm einen schwarzen Stein.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 138
unit 139
Es durchschritt die Menge und berührte sie, und jeder Mann, den es berührte, starb.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 140
Das Gras welkte unter seinen Füßen, wo es ging.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 141
Und die Habgier erschauerte und streute Asche auf ihr Haupt.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 142
»Du bist grausam,« rief sie; »du bist grausam.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 145
Der Nil hat seine Ufer nicht überflutet, und die Priester haben Isis und Osiris geflucht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 147
Aber der Tod lachte wieder.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 148
Er pfiff durch die Finger, und ein Weib kam durch die Luft herbeigeflogen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 149
Pest stand auf ihrer Stirn geschrieben, und ein Schwarm magerer Geier umschwebte sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 150
Sie bedeckte das Tal mit ihren Schwingen, und kein Mensch blieb am Leben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 154
Und der junge König fuhr empor.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 155
unit 158
Und der Kammerherr und die hohen Staatsbeamten traten herein und verneigten sich vor ihm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 159
Die Pagen brachten ihm das goldgestickte Gewand und legten die Krone und das Zepter vor ihn hin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 160
Und der junge König schaute alles an, und es war schön.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 161
Schöner war es als irgend etwas, das er je gesehen hatte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 163
unit 165
unit 167
Sie sind keine wirklichen Dinge, die man beachten müßte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 168
Und was geht uns das Leben derer an, die für uns arbeiten?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 176
Er bog ihn und machte einen Kranz daraus, den er auf sein Haupt setzte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 177
»Dies soll meine Krone sein,« antwortete er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 178
Und so bekleidet schritt er aus seiner Kammer in den großen Saal, wo die Edlen auf ihn warteten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 183
Da trat ein Mann aus der Menge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 185
Durch eure Verschwendung werden wir ernährt, und eure Verderbnis gibt uns Brot.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 187
Glaubst du, daß die Raben uns ernähren werden?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 188
Und wie willst du diese Dinge besser machen?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 190
Hoffentlich nicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 191
Darum kehre in deinen Palast zurück, lege Purpur und zarte Leinwand an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 200
Ich weiß, daß viel Böses in der weiten Welt geschieht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 202
Die Löwen lauern auf die Karawanen und stürzen sich auf die Kamele.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 206
Die Bettler wandern durch die Städte und essen ihre Nahrung mit den Hunden.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 207
Kannst du machen, daß diese Dinge nicht sind?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 208
unit 209
Soll der Löwe deinem Bitten folgen und der wilde Eber dir gehorchen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 210
War Er es nicht, der das Elend seliger machte, als du es bist?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 213
Aber was deine Träume angeht, so denke nicht mehr daran.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 218
Da kam plötzlich von der Straße ein wilder Aufruhr.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 220
»Wo ist der Träumer von Träumen?« riefen sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 223
Und siehe da!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 225
Der tote Stab blühte und trug Lilien, die weißer waren als Perlen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 226
Die verdorrte Dornenranke erblühte und trug Rosen, die roter waren als Rubinen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 227
unit 228
unit 233
»Ein Höherer, als ich bin, hat dich gekrönt,« rief er und kniete vor ihm nieder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 234
unit 235
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 211  2 months ago
"?"
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 233  2 months ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 192  2 months ago
bf2010 5018  commented on  unit 218  2 months ago
Merlin57 4200  commented  2 months ago
anitafunny 6698  commented  2 months ago
anitafunny 6698  commented  2 months ago
Scharing7 1992  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
Scharing7 1992  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 4200  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 170  2 months, 1 week ago
Maria-Helene 2600  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
Omega-I 122  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 122  2 months, 1 week ago
Maria-Helene 2600  commented on  unit 122  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 120  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 102  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 95  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 86  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 85  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 74  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 71  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 60  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 184  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  translated  unit 190  2 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 4200  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 166  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 151  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 162  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 152  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 147  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 138  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 137  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 145  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 131  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 130  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 122  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 34  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 36  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 39  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 40  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 41  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 115  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 102  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 93  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 75  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 68  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 68  2 months, 1 week ago
Maria-Helene 2600  commented on  unit 40  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 33  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 33  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 46  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 83  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5018  commented on  unit 80  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5018  commented on  unit 79  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5018  commented on  unit 81  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5018  commented on  unit 82  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 61  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 37  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 37  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5018  commented on  unit 77  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5018  commented on  unit 78  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 69  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 61  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 53  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 35  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 27  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 21  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 12  2 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 4200  commented  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 9138  commented on  unit 19  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 6698  commented on  unit 3  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 2  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 3  2 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 4200  commented on  unit 3  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 5  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  commented on  unit 2  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 3960  translated  unit 1  2 months, 1 week ago

:-)

by Merlin57 2 months ago

sorry..die Originalgeschichte

by anitafunny 2 months ago

Wenn ich einen Artikel hochlade, den bearbeite, weil manchmal die Rechtschreibung und Grammatik nicht stimmt, bedeutet das nicht nur Arbeit, sondern auch Unsicherheit, ob es sich um ein Original oder eine Übersetzung handelt. Auf der Webseite waren es Märchen die frei gegeben wurden, insbesondere für Kinder. Die Webseite finanziert sich durch Werbung. Es stand auch nichts von copyright. Ich hoffe, dass wir hier alle keine Probleme bekommen werden, denn derjenige, der den Artikel hochlädt, ist verantwortlich dafür...nun bin ich etwas verunsichert! Aber Wendy, ich verstehe durchaus, dass dir das keine Freude hier bereitet zu übersetzen, wenn du bereits den Originalgeschichte kennst, dann ist die Spannung nicht mehr gegeben! Für mich war und ist es neu, und ich freue mich hier von kundigen Leuten überprüft zu werden, damit meine Englischkenntnisse sich verbessern und nur darum geht es mir und natürlich auch um die interessanten Artikeln, seitdem lese ich kaum noch Bücher! Für mich ist die Diskussion hiermit beendet! Schade aber Wendy, dass du nicht dabei bist! Gutenberg kann im Moment einige Artikel nicht freigeben, da von einem Verlag, gerade durch neuzeitliche Übersetzungen, eine Klage läuft. Ich freue mich auf weitere Artikel, die hochgeladen werden, egal ob Original oder Übersetzung, man kann nicht alles kennen....nachdem Motto, erst wenn man viel weiß, weiß man wie wenig man weiß! In dem Sinn, weiterhin frohes Übersetzen😄

by anitafunny 2 months ago

Ergänzung zur Ergänzung:
Andererseits habe ich bei den freigegebenen auch folgendes gefunden: Alle Märchen (Übersetzt von Wilhelm Cremer), hierin sind beide Märchen enthalten.

by Scharing7 2 months, 1 week ago

Nur zur Ergänzung: Bei Gutenberg findet sich folgender Hinweis:

Gesperrt, da Copyright an den Übersetzungen unklar:
Der junge König (Übersetzer unbekannt)
Der glückliche Prinz (Übersetzerin: Alice Seiffert)

by Scharing7 2 months, 1 week ago

Ich danke Euch für eure Interesse und Beiträge -

Zu deiner Frage Anita - nein, ich habe keine Quelle für diese Übersetzung - du und James haben die zwei Übersetzungen von Oscar Wildes Geschichten hochgeladen, also habe ich keine Ahnung wer der Übersetzer ist. Schon, wenn man es nicht weiß, könnte man einfach schreiben : (Eine deutsche Übersetzung von Oscar Wildes 'The Young King'.) Zum Beispiel, wenn ich nicht wüßte, dass Oscar Wilde seine Geschichte in Englisch geschrieben hat, könnte ich denken, dass diese Version seine Originale ist (was nicht der Fall ist).

Ich will keine Vorschift erstellen, ob man so was hochladen soll oder nicht. Persönlich wäre ich nicht dafür, denn es geht für mich irgendwie gegen den Strich, eine Übersetzung wieder in die originale Sprache zu übersetzen, wofür es schon ein originaler Text gibt. Aber das soll jeder für sich entscheiden, und man kann sich auch selber entscheiden mitzumachen oder nicht.

Ich stimme Omega auch zu, dass es gut wäre, wenn man bei Texten, wie zum Beispiel, die von Hans Christian Andersen oder Selma Lagerlöf, entweder den Namen der Übersetzer/in hinzufügen, oder mindestens einen Hinweis, dass es sich um einer Übersetzung handelt, dazu schreiben würde. Darauf werde ich auch in der Zukunft achten :-)

by Merlin57 2 months, 1 week ago

Ich gebe Wendy recht. Vielleicht sollte man nur Texte in Originalsprache herunterladen und nicht eine übersetzte Fassung. Jeder Übersetzer hat seine persönlichen Eigenheiten, die sich bei der Übersetzung widerspiegeln. Wir erfahren das doch auch, wenn wir hier Texte übersetzen und ein anderer seine persönlichen Vorschläge macht. Da ich bisher nie einen Text heruntergeladen habe, weiß ich allerdings nicht, wie schwer es ist, passende Texte, deren Urheberrecht abgelaufen ist, zu finden und herunterzuladen. In diesem Zusammenhang möchte ich deshalb die Gelegenheit nutzen und mich bei allen bedanken, die dies übernommen haben oder noch übernehmen werden.

by Maria-Helene 2 months, 1 week ago

Oscar Wilde war Ire und hat seine Werke in seiner Muttersprache Englisch verfasst. Nicht jedem ist geläufig, wer Oscar Wilde ist, vom Namen her könnte er durchaus auch Deutscher sein, daher wäre ein kurzer Hinweis, dass es sich um eine Übersetzung handelt, äußerst hilfreich.

Bei Texten von Hans Christian Andersen (Däne) oder Selma Lagerlöf (Schwedin) ist klar, dass es sich um Übersetzungen handeln muss, aber auch da wäre ein Hinweis nicht verkehrt.

Da jetzt auch gut erkennbar ist, dass im allgemeinen Diskussionsteil Einträge vorliegen, kann man dort einen Quellenhinweis geben. Das sollte man grundsätzlich tun. Jeder, der mal wissenschaftlich gearbeitet hat, kennt das.
So ist auch immer sofort klar erkennbar, dass es sich um einen freien Text handelt.
Die Ergänzung, dass es sich um eine Übersetzung handelt, kann ja dann leicht hinzugefügt werden.

by Omega-I 2 months, 1 week ago

bzw. vom deutschen Text? Muss ja sein, wenn du den Übersetzer kennst! ..Lies bitte erst unten..danke!

by anitafunny 2 months, 1 week ago

Danke, liebe Wendy, ich habe das auch nicht als Kritik aufgefasst..aber ist es nicht so, dass Weltliteratur auch oft von vielen unterschiedlichen Leuten übersetzt wird...siehe auch Gutenberg...oft gibt es keine Hinweise darauf?? Ich kenne die Quelle nicht, James hat den Artikel hochgeladen...manchmal sind übersetzte Texte Copyright, wenn sie in der Neuzeit übersetzt werden...hier ist also Vorsicht geboten...besser inkognito...aber vielleicht ist die Übersetzung ja auch schon 100 Jahre alt? Hast du eine Quelle vom Original?

by anitafunny 2 months, 1 week ago

Sorry Anita - vielleicht habe ich mich nicht klar ausgedrückt :)
Was hochgeladen worden ist und jetzt in Englisch übersetzt wird, ist eine deutsche Übersetzung von Oscar Wilde's Geschichte, die er in Englisch geschrieben hat. Dass es eine Übersetzung ist, meine Meinung nach, soll man anerkennen - zum Beispiel im Titel, dass es eine deutsche Übersetzung von Herr/Frau Soundso ist, und nicht die Ursprunsgeschichte von Oscar Wilde. Sonst könnte man glauben, dass Oscar Wilde die Geschichte in Deutsch geschrieben hat. Ich wollte das nur zur Erklärung schreiben und als Vorschlag bieten - keine Kritik!

by Merlin57 2 months, 1 week ago

Ja, Wendy weicht der deutsche Text denn so sehr vom Original ab?.Gut, ich kenne den original Text in Englisch nicht und kann es somit nicht beurteilen! Aber im Prinzip ist es doch wirklich egal, wir üben hier ja nur und die Geschichte ist nett... hat der englische Text denn einen anderen Inhalt??Dann könntest du doch den Text in Englisch hochladen und ins Deutsche übersetzen, würde mich sehr interessieren Wendy und danke für den Hinweis!:-)

by anitafunny 2 months, 1 week ago

I know this is simply an exercise in translation, but because what is being translated here is not actually by Oscar Wilde, but a translation of his English original text, would it not be appropriate to acknowledge that in the title of the text. For Example - Der Junge König - Eine Übersetztung von . . . von dem original Text von Oscar Wilde. (There is 'a correct translation of this translation, and that is the original text.) For me, I'm afraid it goes against the grain to be translating a translation back into the language of the original, for which there is a 'correct', original text. (But that is just my personal opinion, and I do not wish to criticise anyone who wishes to participate in the translation of this text.) But I do think it should be made clear that it is a translation that is being translated, and not Oscar Wilde's original text.

by Merlin57 2 months, 1 week ago

Der junge König.
Es war am Vorabend seines Krönungstages, und der junge König saß allein in seinem schönen Gemach. Seine Höflinge hatten sich alle von ihm verabschiedet, indem sie nach der feierlichen Sitte des Tages ihre Köpfe bis zur Erde verneigten, und waren jetzt in dem großen Saal des Palastes versammelt, um von dem Professor des feinen Anstands ein paar letzte Anweisungen zu erhalten. Denn es gab unter ihnen einige, die noch ein ganz natürliches Benehmen zeigten, was bei einem Höfling, man braucht das kaum zu erwähnen, ein sehr schwerer Verstoß ist.

Der Jüngling – denn er war nur ein Jüngling, da er erst sechzehn Jahre zählte – grämte sich nicht über ihr Fortgehen. Mit einem tiefen Seufzer der Befreiung hatte er sich auf die weichen Kissen seines bestickten Lagers zurückgeworfen und lag da mit wilden Augen und offenem Munde, wie ein brauner Waldfaun oder ein junges Tier aus dem Forst, das um ein Haar in die Schlingen der Jäger geraten war.

Und es waren ja auch wirklich Jäger, die ihn gefunden hatten, die fast durch Zufall auf ihn gestoßen waren, als er barfüßig, eine Flöte in der Hand, der Herde des armen Ziegenhirten folgte, der ihn aufgezogen, und für dessen Sohn er sich immer gehalten hatte. Er stammte aber aus einer heimlichen Ehe der einzigen Tochter des alten Königs mit einem Manne, der weit unter ihr stand – einem Fremden, wie einige sagten, der durch den wundervollen Zauber seines Lautenspiels der jungen Prinzessin Liebe erobert hatte, während andere von einem Künstler aus Rimini sprachen, dem die Prinzessin viel, vielleicht zuviel Ehre erwiesen hatte, und der plötzlich aus der Stadt verschwunden war, ohne sein Werk im Dom vollendet zu haben. Das Kind stahl man, als es kaum eine Woche alt war, von der Seite seiner schlafenden Mutter weg und gab es einem einfachen Landmann und seiner Frau, die selbst keine Kinder hatten und im entlegensten Teil des Waldes, mehr als einen Tagesritt von der Stadt entfernt, lebten. Kummer oder die Pest, wie der Hofarzt feststellte, oder, wie manche glaubten, ein schnelles italienisches Gift, das in einem Becher gewürzten Weins gereicht wurde, tötete innerhalb einer Stunde nach seinem Erwachen das zarte Mädchen, das ihn geboren hatte, und als der treue Bote, der das Kind auf seinem Sattelbogen trug, von seinem müden Pferd herabstieg und an die grobe Tür der Hütte des Ziegenhirten klopfte, wurde die Leiche der Prinzessin in ein offenes Grab hinabgelassen, das auf einem verlassenen Kirchhof jenseits der Stadtmauern gegraben war, in ein Grab, von dem es hieß, daß in ihm schon eine andere Leiche lag, die eines jungen Mannes von wunderbarer und fremdländischer Schönheit, dem man die Hände mit verschlungenen Stricken auf dem Rücken zusammengebunden hatte, und dessen Brust viele rote Stichwunden zeigte.

So wenigstens lautete die Geschichte, die sich die Menschen zuflüsterten. Und sicher war es, daß der alte König, als er auf dem Sterbebett lag, entweder aus Reue über seine große Sünde oder einfach, weil er nicht wünschte, daß das Königtum an eine andere Linie fallen sollte, den Jüngling holen ließ und ihn in Gegenwart seines Staatsrats als Erben anerkannte.

Und es scheint, daß er von dem ersten Augenblick seiner Anerkennung an Merkmale jener seltsamen Leidenschaft für Schönheit gezeigt hatte, die bestimmt war, einen so großen Einfluß über sein Leben zu haben. Diejenigen, die ihn nach der Zimmerflucht begleiteten, die man zu seiner Benutzung ausgewählt hatte, sprachen oft von dem Freudenschrei, der von seinen Lippen brach, als er das feine Gewand und die reichen Juwelen sah, die man für ihn bereithielt, und die fast wilde Lust, mit der er den groben Lederrock und den rauhen Schaffellmantel von sich schleuderte. Er vermißte zwar manchmal die schöne Freiheit seines Waldlebens und war stets geneigt, sich über die langweiligen Hofzeremonien zu ärgern, die ihm soviel von jedem Tag fortnahmen, aber der wundervolle Palast – den freudenreichen nannte man ihn – in dessen Besitz er sich jetzt wußte, erschien ihm wie eine neue Welt, die zu seinem Entzücken eigens geschaffen war. Und sobald er der Ratsversammlung oder dem Audienzzimmer entfliehen konnte, lief er die große Treppe mit ihren Löwen aus vergoldeter Bronze und ihren Stufen aus schimmerndem Porphyr hinab und wanderte von Zimmer zu Zimmer und von Flur zu Flur, wie jemand, der im Schönen ein Heilmittel gegen den Schmerz, eine Gesundung aus dem Siechtum sucht.

Auf diesen Entdeckungsfahrten, wie er sie wohl nannte – und sie waren ja für ihn wirkliche Reisen durch ein wunderbares Land, wurde er oft von den schlanken, blondhaarigen Hofpagen begleitet mit ihren wehenden Mänteln und den lustig flatternden Bändern. Aber noch viel öfter war er allein, denn mit einem schnellen, sicheren Instinkt, der fast eine Offenbarung war, fühlte er, daß die Geheimnisse der Kunst nur im Geheimen gelernt werden können, und daß Schönheit, wie Weisheit, den einsamen Verehrer liebt.

Viele seltsame Geschichten wurden um diese Zeit über ihn berichtet. Man erzählte, daß ein würdiger Bürgermeister, der gekommen war, für die Bürger der Stadt eine mit blühenden Phrasen geschmückte Denkschrift zu überreichen, gesehen hatte, wie er in wirklicher Anbetung vor einem großen Gemälde kniete, das man gerade aus Venedig gebracht hatte, und das den Dienst irgendwelcher neuen Götter zu verkünden schien. Ein andermal wurde er mehrere Stunden vermißt und nach langem Suchen fand man ihn in einer kleinen Kammer in einem der Nordtürme des Palastes, wie er ganz verzaubert auf eine griechische Gemme starrte, in die die Figur des Adonis eingeschnitten war. Man hatte ferner beobachtet, wie er seine warmen Lippen auf die marmorne Stirn einer antiken Statue drückte, die man beim Bau einer Steinbrücke im Flußbett gefunden hatte, und die den Namen eines bithynischen Sklaven Hadrians trug. Und eine ganze Nacht verbrachte er damit, den Eindruck zu beobachten, den das Mondlicht auf eine silberne Statue des Endymion machte.

Alle seltenen und kostbaren Gegenstände übten jedenfalls einen starken Zauber auf ihn aus, und in seinem Verlangen, sie sich zu verschaffen, hatte er viele Kaufleute ausgesandt, einige, um von dem rauhen Fischervolk der Nordsee Meerschaum einzuhandeln, andere, um in Ägypten nach jenen merkwürdigen grünen Türkisen zu suchen, die man nur in den Gräbern der Könige findet, und von denen man sagt, daß sie magische Eigenschaften besitzen. Noch andere mußten nach Persien reisen für seidene Teppiche und bemalte Töpferwaren, oder nach Indien, um Florgewebe zu kaufen und buntes Elfenbein, Mondsteine und Armbänder aus Achat, Sandelholz und blaues Emaille und Halstücher aus weicher Wolle.

Aber, was ihn am meisten beschäftigt hatte, war das Gewand, das er bei seiner Krönung tragen sollte, das Kleid aus gewebtem Gold, die rubinengeschmückte Krone und das Zepter mit seinen Kränzen und Reihen von Perlen. Und auch an diesem Abend dachte er daran, als er auf seinem kostbaren Lager lag, und den großen Block von Tannenholz betrachtete, der langsam in dem offenen Kamin verglühte. Die Entwürfe aus den Händen der berühmtesten Künstler waren ihm schon vor vielen Monaten vorgelegt worden, und er hatte Befehl gegeben, daß die Handwerker Tag und Nacht arbeiten sollten, um sie auszuführen, und daß man die ganze Welt nach Juwelen durchsuchen sollte, die dieser Arbeit würdig waren. In Gedanken sah er sich schon in dem strahlenden Gewand eines Königs vor dem Hochaltar des Domes stehen, und ein Lächeln umspielte seine jungen Lippen und entfachte strahlenden Glanz in seinen dunklen Waldaugen.

Nach einiger Zeit erhob er sich von seinem Lager, lehnte sich gegen den geschnitzten Vorbau des Kamins und sah sich in dem matterleuchteten Raum um. Die Wände waren mit reichen Gobelins behangen, die den Triumph der Schönheit darstellten. Ein großer, mit Achat und Lapislazuli ausgelegter Schrank nahm die eine Ecke ein, und dem Fenster gegenüber stand ein seltsam gearbeiteter Juwelenschrank mit Lacktäfelung aus gepulvertem und in Mosaik ausgelegtem Gold, auf dem einige kostbare Humpen aus venetianischem Glas standen und ein Becher aus dunkelgeädertem Onyx. Die seidene Bettdecke war mit bleichen Mohnblumen bestickt, als seien sie der müden Hand des Schlafes entfallen, und schlankes Ried aus gerilltem Elfenbein trug den samtenen Betthimmel, von dem große Büschel von Straußenfedern wie ein weißer Schaum zu dem bleichen Silber der gegitterten Decke emporsprangen. Ein lachender Narziß in grüner Bronze hielt einen polierten Spiegel über seinen Kopf. Auf dem Tisch stand eine flache Schüssel aus Amethyst.

Draußen konnte er den hohen Bau des Domes sehen, der wie ein Scheingebilde über den schattenversunkenen Häusern emporragte, und die müden Schildwachen, die auf der nebligen Terrasse am Fluß auf und ab gingen. Weit entfernt sang eine Nachtigall in einem Obstgarten. Ein leiser Jasminduft kam durch das offne Fenster. Er strich seine braunen Locken aus der Stirn, nahm eine Laute und ließ seine Finger über die Saiten gleiten. Seine schweren Augenlider sanken, und eine seltsame Erschlaffung überkam ihn. Noch nie hatte er bisher so eindringlich oder mit einer solchen köstlichen Freude den Zauber und das Geheimnis schöner Dinge empfunden.

Als es von dem Glockenturm Mitternacht schlug, klingelte er, und seine Pagen traten ein und entkleideten ihn mit großer Feierlichkeit, indem sie Rosenwasser über seine Hände gossen und Blumen auf sein Kissen streuten. Wenige Minuten, nachdem sie das Zimmer verlassen hatten, schlief er ein.

Und als er schlief, träumte er einen Traum, und dieses war sein Traum:

Er glaubte, er stände in einer langen, niedrigen Dachstube inmitten des Schwirrens und Rasselns vieler Webstühle. Ein dürftiges Tageslicht drang durch die vergitterten Fenster und zeigte ihm die mageren Gestalten der Weber, die sich über ihre Gehäuse beugten. Bleiche, krank aussehende Kinder krochen über die schweren Querbalken. Wenn die Weberschiffchen durch die Kette schossen, dann hoben sie die schweren Laden hoch, und wenn die Schiffchen hielten, dann ließen sie die Laden fallen und preßten die Fäden zusammen. Ihre Gesichter waren eingefallen vom Nahrungsmangel, und ihre dünnen Hände bebten und zitterten. Einige abgehärmte Frauen saßen an einem Tisch und nähten. Ein schrecklicher Geruch erfüllte den Raum. Die Luft war verdorben und drückend, und die Wände tropften und strömten von Feuchtigkeit.

Der junge König trat zu einem der Weber hin, blieb bei ihm stehen und beobachtete ihn.

Aber der Weber blickte ihn ärgerlich an und sagte: »Warum beobachtest du mich? Bist du ein Spion, den unser Meister über uns gesetzt hat?«

»Wer ist dein Meister?« fragte der junge König.

»Unser Meister?« rief der Weber bitter. »Er ist ein Mann, wie ich auch. Es gibt tatsächlich nur einen Unterschied zwischen uns, nämlich, daß er feine Kleider trägt, und ich in Lumpen gehe, und daß, während ich elend vor Hunger bin, er nicht wenig durch zu reichliches Essen leidet!«

»Das Land ist frei,« sagte der junge König, »und du bist keines Mannes Sklave.«

»Im Kriege«, antwortete der Weber, »macht der Starke den Schwachen zum Sklaven, und im Frieden macht der Reiche den Armen zum Sklaven. Wir müssen arbeiten, um zu leben, und sie geben uns so niedrige Löhne, daß wir sterben. Den ganzen Tag über quälen wir uns für sie ab, und sie sammeln das Gold in ihren Schatzkammern. Unsere Kinder siechen vor der Zeit dahin, und die Gesichter derer, die wir lieben, werden hart und häßlich. Wir keltern die Trauben, und die andern trinken den Wein. Wir säen das Korn, und unser eigener Tisch ist leer. Wir tragen Ketten, wenn auch keiner sie sieht, und sind Sklaven, obgleich die Menschen uns frei nennen.«

»Ist das so mit allen?« fragte er.

»Es ist so mit allen,« antwortete der Weber, »mit den Jungen sowohl wie mit den Alten, mit den Frauen sowohl wie mit den Männern, mit den kleinen Kindern sowohl wie mit denen, die hochbejahrt sind. Die Kaufleute schinden uns, und wir müssen aus Not ihren Befehlen gehorchen. Der Priester fährt vorüber und betet seinen Rosenkranz, und niemand kümmert sich um uns. Durch unsere lichtlosen Gassen kriecht die Armut mit ihren hungrigen Augen, und das Laster mit seinem geschwollenen Gesicht folgt ihr auf dem Fuße. Elend weckt uns auf am Morgen, und Schande sitzt bei uns am Abend. Aber was sind diese Dinge für dich? Du bist keiner von uns. Dein Gesicht ist zu glücklich.« Und er wandte sich finster von ihm ab und warf das Schiffchen in den Webstuhl, und der König sah, daß es mit goldenen Fäden gefüllt war.

Da überkam ihn ein großer Schrecken, und er fragte den Weber: »Was ist das für ein Kleid, das du webst?«

»Es ist das Krönungskleid des jungen Königs,« antwortete er; »was kümmert das dich?«

Und der junge König stieß einen lauten Schrei aus und erwachte, und siehe, er befand sich in seinem eigenen Zimmer, und durch das Fenster sah er den großen honigfarbenen Mond am dunklen Himmel hängen.

Und er schlief wieder ein und träumte, und dies war sein Traum:

Er glaubte, er läge auf dem Verdeck einer riesigen Galeere, die von hundert Sklaven gerudert wurde. Auf einem Teppich neben ihm saß der Herr der Galeere. Er war schwarz wie Ebenholz, und sein Turban war von roter Seide. Große silberne Ohrringe zogen die dicken Ohrläppchen herab, und in seiner Hand hatte er eine elfenbeinerne Wage.

Die Sklaven waren nackt bis auf ein zerfetztes Lendentuch, und jedermann war mit seinem Nachbar zusammengekettet. Die heiße Sonne brannte grell auf sie herab, und die Neger liefen den Gang hinauf und hinunter und schlugen sie mit Lederpeitschen. Die Sklaven streckten ihre mageren Arme aus und zogen die schweren Ruder durch das Wasser. Der salzige Schaum floß von den Schaufeln.

Schließlich erreichten sie eine kleine Bucht und begannen zu loten. Ein leichter Wind wehte vom Ufer und überzog das Verdeck und das große Lateinsegel mit seinem roten Staub. Drei Araber, die auf wilden Eseln saßen, ritten hervor und warfen Speere nach ihnen. Der Herr der Galeere nahm einen bemalten Bogen in seine Hand und schoß einen von ihnen in die Kehle. Er fiel schwer in die Brandung, und seine Gefährten galoppierten davon. Eine in einen gelben Schleier gehüllte Frau folgte langsam auf einem Kamel und sah sich dann und wann nach dem Toten um.

Sobald sie Anker geworfen und das Segel eingezogen hatten, gingen die Neger unter Deck und zogen eine lange Strickleiter herauf, die schwer mit Blei belastet war. Der Herr der Galeere warf sie über Bord und befestigte die Enden an zwei eisernen Pfosten. Dann ergriffen die Neger den jüngsten der Sklaven, schlugen seine Fesseln ab, füllten seine Nasenlöcher und seine Ohren mit Wachs und befestigten einen schweren Stein an seinem Leib. Müde kroch er die Leiter hinab und verschwand in der See. Ein paar Blasen stiegen auf, wo er versank. Einige von den andern Sklaven blickten neugierig über die Bordseite. Am Bug der Galeere saß ein Haifischbeschwörer und schlug einförmig auf eine Trommel. Nach einiger Zeit kam der Taucher aus dem Wasser empor und hing keuchend an der Leiter mit einer Perle in seiner rechten Hand. Die Neger entrissen sie ihm und stießen ihn wieder hinab. Die Sklaven schliefen an ihren Rudern ein.

Wieder und wieder tauchte er auf, und jedesmal brachte er eine schöne Perle empor. Der Herr der Galeere wog sie und steckte sie in eine kleine Tasche aus grünem Leder.

Der junge König versuchte zu sprechen, aber seine Zunge schien ihm am Gaumen zu kleben, und seine Lippen verweigerten den Dienst. Die Neger schwatzten miteinander und begannen über eine Schnur glänzender Perlen zu streiten. Zwei Kraniche flogen im Kreise um das Schiff.

Dann kam der Taucher zum letztenmal empor, und die Perle, die er mitbrachte, war schöner als alle Perlen des Ormuzd, denn sie war geformt wie der Vollmond und weißer als der Morgenstern. Aber des Sklaven Gesicht war seltsam bleich, und als er auf das Verdeck fiel, strömte ihm Blut aus Nase und Ohren. Er bebte noch eine Weile, dann war er still. Die Neger zuckten ihre Achseln und warfen die Leiche über Bord.

Aber der Herr der Galeere lachte. Er streckte seine Hand aus, nahm die Perle, und als er sie sah, drückte er sie gegen seine Stirn und verneigte sich. »Sie soll für das Zepter des jungen Königs sein,« sagte er und gab den Negern ein Zeichen, den Anker zu lichten.

Doch als der junge König dies hörte, stieß er einen lauten Schrei aus und erwachte. Und durch das Fenster sah er die langen, grauen Finger der Dämmerung nach den verschwindenden Sternen greifen.

Und er schlief wieder ein und träumte, und dies war sein Traum:

Er glaubte, er wanderte durch ein dunkles Gehölz, das mit seltsamen Früchten und mit schönen giftigen Blumen behangen war. Die Nattern zischten ihn an, als er vorüber kam, und die farbigen Papageien flogen schreiend von Zweig zu Zweig. Riesige Schildkröten lagen schlafend auf dem heißen Schlamm. Die Bäume waren voll von Affen und Pfauen.

Weiter und weiter ging er durch das Gehölz, bis er den Rand erreichte, und da sah er eine unendliche Menschenmenge im Bett eines ausgetrockneten Flusses arbeiten. Sie schwärmten die Klippen herauf wie Ameisen. Sie gruben tiefe Löcher in den Grund und stiegen in sie hinab. Einige zerschlugen die Felsen mit schweren Hacken, andere tappten im Sand umher. Sie rissen den Kaktus mit den Wurzeln heraus und zertraten seine scharlachroten Blüten. Sie eilten umher, riefen sich zu, und keiner war müßig.

Aus dem Dunkel einer Höhle beobachteten sie der Tod und die Habgier, und der Tod sagte: »Ich bin müde; gib mir ein Drittel von ihnen und laß mich weitergehen.«

Aber die Habgier schüttelte ihren Kopf. »Sie sind meine Diener,« antwortete sie.

Und der Tod fragte sie: »Was hast du in deiner Hand?« »Ich habe drei Getreidekörner,« sagte sie; »was ist das für dich?«

»Gib mir eins davon,« rief der Tod, »ich will es in meinen Garten pflanzen; nur eins, und ich werde weggehen.«

»Ich will dir gar nichts geben,« sagte die Habgier und steckte ihre Hand in die Falten ihres Gewandes.

Aber der Tod lachte. Er nahm einen Becher, tauchte ihn in eine Wasserpfütze, und aus dem Becher entstieg Schüttelfrost. Der schritt durch die große Menge, und ein Drittel lag tot da. Ein kalter Nebel folgte ihm, und die Wasserschlangen liefen ihm zur Seite.

Als nun die Habgier sah, daß ein Drittel der Menge tot war, schlug sie sich an die Brust und weinte. Sie schlug ihren dürren Busen und schrie laut. »Ein Drittel meiner Diener hast du erschlagen,« rief sie, »mach dich fort. Es ist Krieg in den Bergen der Tatarei und die Könige beider Lager rufen nach dir. Die Afghanen haben den schwarzen Stier geschlachtet und marschieren in die Schlacht. Sie haben mit ihren Speeren auf die Schilder geschlagen und ihre eisernen Helme aufgesetzt. Was kann dir mein Tal sein, daß du dich darin aufhältst? Geh deiner Wege und komm nie wieder hierher.«

»Nein,« sagte der Tod, »solange du mir kein Samenkorn gegeben hast, werde ich nicht fortgehen.«

Aber die Habgier schloß ihre Hand und biß sich auf die Zähne. »Ich will dir gar nichts geben,« murrte sie.

Und der Tod lachte und nahm einen schwarzen Stein. Er warf ihn in den Wald, und aus einem Dickicht wilden Schierlings kam in einem Flammenkleid das Fieber. Es durchschritt die Menge und berührte sie, und jeder Mann, den es berührte, starb. Das Gras welkte unter seinen Füßen, wo es ging.

Und die Habgier erschauerte und streute Asche auf ihr Haupt. »Du bist grausam,« rief sie; »du bist grausam. In den befestigten Städten Indiens herrscht die Hungersnot, und die Brunnen von Samarkand sind vertrocknet. Hungersnot herrscht in den befestigten Städten Ägyptens, und die Heuschrecken sind aus der Wüste gekommen. Der Nil hat seine Ufer nicht überflutet, und die Priester haben Isis und Osiris geflucht. Geh zu denen, die dich brauchen, und laß meine Diener in Frieden.«

»Nein,« sagte der Tod, »solange du mir kein Samenkorn gegeben hast, werde ich nicht fortgehen.«

»Ich will dir gar nichts geben,« sagte die Habgier.

Aber der Tod lachte wieder. Er pfiff durch die Finger, und ein Weib kam durch die Luft herbeigeflogen. Pest stand auf ihrer Stirn geschrieben, und ein Schwarm magerer Geier umschwebte sie. Sie bedeckte das Tal mit ihren Schwingen, und kein Mensch blieb am Leben.

Da floh die Habgier schreiend durch den Wald, der Tod aber stieg auf sein rotes Roß und ritt davon, und sein Reiten ging schneller als der Wind.

Und aus dem Schlamm, der den Boden des Tales bedeckte, krochen Drachen und häßliches Getier mit Schuppen, und die Schakale kamen über den Sand getrabt und beschnupperten die Luft mit ihren Nüstern.

Da weinte der junge König und sprach: »Wer waren wohl diese Menschen, und wonach suchten sie?«

»Sie suchten Rubinen für die Krone eines Königs,« antwortete jemand, der hinter ihm stand.

Und der junge König fuhr empor. Er wandte sich um und sah einen Mann im Pilgergewand, der in seiner Hand einen silbernen Spiegel hielt.

Da erbleichte er und fragte: »Für welchen König?«

Und der Pilger antwortete: »Blicke in diesen Spiegel, und du wirst ihn sehen.«

Der König blickte in den Spiegel, und als er sein eigenes Gesicht sah, stieß er einen lauten Schrei aus und erwachte. Das helle Sonnenlicht strömte in das Zimmer, und aus den Bäumen seines Parks und Lustgartens sangen die Vögel.

Und der Kammerherr und die hohen Staatsbeamten traten herein und verneigten sich vor ihm. Die Pagen brachten ihm das goldgestickte Gewand und legten die Krone und das Zepter vor ihn hin.

Und der junge König schaute alles an, und es war schön. Schöner war es als irgend etwas, das er je gesehen hatte. Aber er erinnerte sich seines Traumes und sprach zu seinen Edlen: »Nehmt diese Dinge weg, denn ich will sie nicht tragen.«

Und die Höflinge waren erstaunt, und einige lachten, denn sie glaubten, er rede im Scherz.

Aber er sprach von neuem ernsthaft zu ihnen und sagte: »Nehmt diese Dinge weg, daß ich sie nicht sehe. Wenn es auch mein Krönungstag ist, ich will sie nicht tragen, denn der Webstuhl der Trübsal und die Hände des Leides haben dieses mein Gewand gewebt. Blut ist im Herzen des Rubins, und Tod im Herzen der Perle.« Und er erzählte ihnen seine drei Träume.

Und als die Höflinge das hörten, sahen sie sich an und flüsterten untereinander: »Sicherlich ist er wahnsinnig; denn was ist ein Traum anders als ein Traum, und eine Erscheinung anders als eine Erscheinung? Sie sind keine wirklichen Dinge, die man beachten müßte. Und was geht uns das Leben derer an, die für uns arbeiten? Soll ein Mann kein Brot essen, bevor er den Säemann gesprochen, noch Wein trinken, bevor er den Winzer gesehen hat?«

Und der Kammerherr redete den jungen König an und sprach: »Mein Herr, ich bitte dich, schlage dir diese trüben Gedanken aus dem Sinn, lege dieses schöne Gewand an und setze die Krone auf dein Haupt. Denn woran soll das Volk erkennen, daß du der König bist, wenn du keine Königskleider trägst?«

Und der junge König blickte ihn an: »Ist das wirklich so?« fragte er. »Werden sie mich nicht als König erkennen, wenn ich kein Königskleid trage?«

»Sie werden dich nicht erkennen, mein Herr,« rief der Kammerherr.

»Ich hatte geglaubt, daß es früher königliche Menschen gegeben habe,« antwortete er, »doch es mag sein, wie du sagst. Ich will aber dieses Gewand nicht tragen, noch will ich mich mit dieser Krone krönen lassen, sondern so, wie ich in den Palast kam, will ich aus ihm hinaustreten.«

Und er bat alle, ihn zu verlassen, mit Ausnahme eines Pagen, den er bei sich behielt, eines Jünglings, der ein Jahr jünger war als er selbst. Ihn behielt er zu seiner Bedienung, und als er sich in klarem Wasser gebadet hatte, öffnete er eine große bemalte Truhe und zog daraus die lederne Jacke und den rauhen Schafspelz hervor, die er getragen hatte, als er auf dem Hügelabhang die zottigen Ziegen seiner Ziegenherde weidete.

Und der kleine Page öffnete erstaunt seine blauen Augen und sagte lächelnd zu ihm: »Mein Herr, ich sehe dein Gewand und dein Zepter, aber wo ist deine Krone?«

Und der junge König riß einen Zweig von einem wilden Rosenstrauch ab, der über den Balkon herüberrankte. Er bog ihn und machte einen Kranz daraus, den er auf sein Haupt setzte.

»Dies soll meine Krone sein,« antwortete er.

Und so bekleidet schritt er aus seiner Kammer in den großen Saal, wo die Edlen auf ihn warteten.

Aber die Edlen lachten, und einige riefen ihm zu: »Herr, das Volk wartet auf seinen König, du aber zeigst ihnen einen Bettler.« Andere ergrimmten und sagten: »Er bringt Schande über den Staat und ist unwürdig, unser Herrscher zu sein.«

Aber er antwortete ihnen kein Wort, sondern schritt weiter. Er ging die strahlende Porphyrtreppe hinab und durch die bronzenen Tore, er stieg auf sein Roß und ritt nach dem Dom, während der kleine Page neben ihm lief.

Und die Leute lachten und sprachen: »Er ist des Königs Narr, der herbeireitet,« und sie spotteten über ihn.

Da hielt er sein Pferd an und sagte: »Ihr irrt, ich bin der König.« Und er erzählte ihnen seine drei Träume.

Da trat ein Mann aus der Menge. Er sprach bittere Worte und sagte: »Herr, weißt du nicht, daß aus dem Luxus der Reichen das Leben der Armen kommt? Durch eure Verschwendung werden wir ernährt, und eure Verderbnis gibt uns Brot. Für einen harten Herrn arbeiten, ist bitter, aber noch bitterer ist es, keinen Herrn zu haben, für den man arbeiten kann. Glaubst du, daß die Raben uns ernähren werden? Und wie willst du diese Dinge besser machen? Willst du zu dem Bauherrn sagen: ›du sollst zu einem solchen Preise bauen‹, und zu dem Händler: ›du sollst zu einem solchen Preis verkaufen‹? Hoffentlich nicht. Darum kehre in deinen Palast zurück, lege Purpur und zarte Leinwand an. Was hast du mit uns zu tun und mit dem, was wir leiden?«

»Sind nicht die Armen und die Reichen Brüder?« fragte der junge König.

»Ja,« antwortete der Mann, »und der Name des reichen Bruders ist Kain.«

Da füllten sich die Augen des jungen Königs mit Tränen, und er ritt weiter durch das Murren der Menge, und der kleine Page fürchtete sich und verließ ihn.

Und als er das große Domportal erreichte, streckten die Soldaten ihre Hellebarden aus und sagten: »Was suchst du hier? Niemand darf durch diese Pforte eintreten als der König.«

Da rötete sich sein Gesicht vor Zorn und er sprach zu ihnen: »Ich bin der König.« Dann drückte er ihre Hellebarden zur Seite und ging hinein.

Als ihn der alte Bischof in der Kleidung des Ziegenhirten kommen sah, erhob er sich erstaunt von seinem Stuhl, trat auf ihn zu und sprach zu ihm: »Mein Sohn, ist dies die Tracht eines Königs? Und mit welcher Krone soll ich dich krönen, und welches Zepter soll ich in deine Hand legen? Sicherlich soll dies doch für dich ein Freudentag sein und nicht ein Tag der Erniedrigung?«

»Darf sich Freude mit dem schmücken, was Leid geschaffen hat?« fragte der junge König, und er erzählte ihm seine drei Träume.

Als der Bischof sie gehört hatte, zog er seine Stirn in Falten und sprach: »Mein Sohn, ich bin ein alter Mann und am Ende meiner Tage. Ich weiß, daß viel Böses in der weiten Welt geschieht. Die wilden Räuber kommen von den Bergen herab, stehlen die kleinen Kinder und verkaufen sie an die Mohren. Die Löwen lauern auf die Karawanen und stürzen sich auf die Kamele. Der wilde Eber wühlt das Getreide im Tale auf, und die Füchse zerfressen die Weinstöcke auf dem Hügel. Die Piraten brandschatzen die Meeresküste und verbrennen die Schiffe der Fischer und nehmen ihnen ihre Netze. In den Salzsümpfen leben die Aussätzigen; sie haben Hütten aus geflochtenem Ried, und niemand darf ihnen nahe kommen. Die Bettler wandern durch die Städte und essen ihre Nahrung mit den Hunden. Kannst du machen, daß diese Dinge nicht sind? Willst du den Aussätzigen zum Bettgenossen nehmen und den Bettler an deinen Tisch setzen? Soll der Löwe deinem Bitten folgen und der wilde Eber dir gehorchen? War Er es nicht, der das Elend seliger machte, als du es bist? Darum preise ich dich nicht für das, was du getan hast, sondern bitte dich, nach dem Palast zurückzureiten, dein Antlitz zu erheitern und das Gewand anzuziehen, das einem Könige geziemt. Dann werde ich dich mit der goldenen Krone krönen und das Perlenzepter in deine Hand legen. Aber was deine Träume angeht, so denke nicht mehr daran. Die Bürde dieser Welt ist zu schwer, als daß ein Mensch sie tragen könnte, und das Leid der Welt ist zu gewaltig, als daß ein Herz es erdulden könnte.«

»Sprichst du so in diesem Hause?« fragte der junge König, und er schritt an dem Bischof vorüber, stieg die Stufen zum Altar hinauf und stand vor dem Bildnis Christi.

Er stand vor dem Bildnis Christi, und rechts und links von ihm waren die wunderbaren goldenen Gefäße, der Kelch mit dem gelben Wein und die Flasche mit dem heiligen Öl. Er kniete vor dem Bilde Christi nieder, und die großen Kerzen brannten hell neben dem juwelengeschmückten Schrein, und der Qualm des Weihrauchs zog sich in dünnen blauen Wolken durch den Dom. Er neigte sein Haupt im Gebet, und die Priester in ihren gesteiften Chorröcken zogen sich vom Altar zurück.

Da kam plötzlich von der Straße ein wilder Aufruhr. Die Ritter drangen herein mit gezogenen Schwertern, mit nickenden Federbüschen und Schilden aus geschliffenem Stahl. »Wo ist der Träumer von Träumen?« riefen sie. »Wo ist dieser König, der sich kleidet wie ein Bettler – dieser Knabe, der Schande über den Staat bringt? Wahrhaftig, wir wollen ihn erschlagen, denn er ist unwürdig, über uns zu herrschen.« Und der junge König verneigte noch einmal sein Haupt und betete, und als er sein Gebet beendet hatte, erhob er sich, wandte sich um und sah sie traurig an.

Und siehe da! Durch die bunten Fenster strömte das Sonnenlicht über ihn hin, und die Sonnenstrahlen umwoben ihn mit einem goldenen Gewand, das kostbarer war als das Gewand, das man zu seiner Lust angefertigt hatte. Der tote Stab blühte und trug Lilien, die weißer waren als Perlen. Die verdorrte Dornenranke erblühte und trug Rosen, die roter waren als Rubinen. Weißer als echte Perlen waren die Lilien, und ihre Stengel waren von glänzendem Silber. Roter als kostbare Rubinen waren die Rosen, und ihre Blätter waren von getriebenem Gold.

Er stand da im Gewand eines Königs, und die Türen des juwelengeschmückten Schreins flogen auf, und von dem Kristall der vielstrahligen Monstranz schien ein wunderbares und geheimnisvolles Licht. Er stand da im Gewand eines Königs, und die Glorie Gottes erfüllte den Raum, und die Heiligen in ihren geschnitzten Nischen schienen sich zu bewegen. In dem strahlenden Gewand eines Königs stand er vor ihnen, und die Orgel dröhnte ihre Musik, die Trompeter bliesen auf ihren Trompeten, und der Knabenchor begann zu singen. Das Volk aber fiel scheu auf die Knie, die Ritter steckten ihre Schwerter ein und huldigten ihm, und des Bischofs Antlitz wurde bleich, und seine Hände zitterten. »Ein Höherer, als ich bin, hat dich gekrönt,« rief er und kniete vor ihm nieder.

Und der junge König stieg vom Hochaltar herab und schritt heim durch die Mitte des Volkes. Aber keiner wagte es, ihm ins Antlitz zu schauen, denn es war wie das Antlitz eines Engels.