de-en  Die bedeutende Rakete von Oscar Wilde Medium
The Important Rocket.
The wedding of the king's son was imminent and therefore there was general rejoicing. He had waited a whole year for his bride, and at last she had arrived. She was a Russian princess, and a sleigh pulled by six reindeer had brought her from Finland. The sleigh was shaped like a big, golden swan and between the wings of the swan rested the little princess. Her long ermine coat reached right down to her feet. On her head she wore a tiny cap made of silver fabric, and she was as pale as the snow palace, in which she had always lived. She was so pale, that all people were surprised, when she drove through the streets.

"She is like a white rose!" they shouted and threw flowers down on her from the balconies.

At the castle gate she was received by the prince. He had dreamy violet eyes, and his hair was like fine gold.

When he saw her, he sank to his knee and kissed her hand.

"Your image was beautiful," he said quietly, " but you are even more beautiful than your image." And the little princess blushed.

"She was like a white rose," said one young page to another, "now she is like a red rose," and the whole court was delighted.

During the next three days everybody went about saying, white rose, red rose, red rose, white rose," and the king gave orders that the page boy's salary was to be doubled. Since he received no salary at all, it didn't do him much good, but it was considered a great honor and was duly announced in the court gazette.

When the three days were over the wedding was celebrated. It was a great thing, and bride and groom walked hand in hand under a purple velvet canopy embroidered with little pearls. Then there was a state banquet that lasted five hours. The prince and princess sat upstairs in the great hall and drank from a crystal goblet. ... Only faithful lovers could drink from this cup, for as false lips touch it, it becomes dull and cloudy.

"That they love one another," said the little page, "it's as clear as crystal!" And the king doubled his salary for the second time, and the whole court shouted, "What an honor!"

After the banquet, a ball was to take place, and the bride and groom were to dance the rose dance, and the king had promised to play the flute. He played very badly, but no one had ever dared to tell him that because he was the king. He could only play three melodies and never knew exactly which one he was playing; but that didn't matter, because whatever he did, everyone kept shouting, "Wonderful! Lovely!" The last number on the program was a big fireworks display to be set off at midnight. ... The little princess had never seen a fireworks display in her life, and so the king had given the order that the royal pyrotechnician was to be present on their wedding day.

"What is that, fireworks?" she had asked the prince when one morning they walked on the terrace.

"It's like the northern lights," said the king, who always replied to questions posed by others, "but much more natural. I prefer it to the stars, because you always know exactly when it starts, and it's as beautiful as my flute playing. You absolutely have to see this." Thus a stand had been erected at the very bottom of the royal garden, and as soon as the royal pyrotechnician had put everything in its right place, the fireworks began to talk to each other.

" The world is really too beautiful!" a little enthusiast called. "Look at those yellow tulips. If they were real bangers, they couldn't be more beautiful. I'm very glad, that I've travelled. Traveling molds the mind and thoroughly clears up all prejudices." "The king's garden is not the world, you crazy enthusiast!" said a large Roman candle. "The world is a vast place and it would take you three days to see it all. "Every place you love is the world to you," said a thoughtful pinwheel that had been attached to an old wooden box since childhood and gloated over its broken heart. "But love is no longer fashionable, and the poets have killed it. They wrote so much about it that no one believed them anymore, which I am not surprised about. ... Then true love suffers and keeps silent. I remember how I myself once ... But nobody cares about that now - romance is a thing of the past." "Nonsense," said the Roman candle, "Romanticism never dies. It's like the moon and lives forever. For example, the bride and the groom love each other very much. I heard all about her this morning from a brown cartridge that happened to be in the same drawer as me and knew the latest news from the court." But the pinwheel shook its head. " The romance is dead, the romance is dead, the romance is dead," it said quietly. The wheel belonged to those people who believe that if they say the same thing several times, it will come true in the end.

Suddenly one heard a sharp, dry cough, and everyone looked around.

It came from a large, haughty-looking rocket tied to the end of a long stick. It coughed every time before making a remark to attract attention.

"Ahem! Ahem!" it said, and everyone listened except for the pinwheel, which still shook its head and remained silent: "Romanticism is dead." "Silence! Silence!" screamed an enthusiast He was something like a politician and had always played a big role in the elections, so he knew the correct parliamentary expressions.

"Totally dead," whispered the pinwheel and fell asleep. As soon as it was absolutely silent, the rocket coughed for the third time and began. It spoke slowly and clearly, as if dictating its memoirs, always looking over its shoulder at those to whom it was speaking. It actually has very noble manners.

"How happy it is for the king's son," it remarked, "that he is getting married on the very day that I am to be set off. Even if it had been arranged that way before, it couldn't have been better for him to meet, but princes are always lucky. "My God," said the little enthusiast, "I thought it was just the other way round, and we would be released in honour of the prince." "That may be the case with you," it replied, "and it's undoubtedly the case, but with me it's a little different. I am a very special rocket and come from very special parents. My mother was the most celebrated pinwheel of fire of her time and famous for her graceful dancing. When she appeared in public, she turned nineteen times before she went out, and with every turn she threw seven pink stars into the air. It was three and a half feet in diameter and was made of the best gunpowder. My father was a rocket like me of French descent. It flew so high that people feared it would never come down again. But it did come again, for he had a kind nature, and made a brilliant crash in a shower of golden rain. The newspapers wrote about its performance in the most flattering expressions. The court gazette called him a triumph of pylotechnics." "You mean pyrotechnics, pyrotechnics," said a Bengal light.

"I know it's called pyrotechnics, because that's how I saw it written on my own box." "So I say pylotechnics," replied the rocket in a stern tone, and the Bengal light felt so crushed by what it said that it immediately began to intimidate the little enthusiasts to demonstrate that it was still a person of some importance.

"I said,' continued the rocket, 'I said, yes, what did I say? "You spoke of yourself', the Roman candle replied.

"Of course; I knew I was talking about an interesting object when I was so unmannerly interrupted. I hate rottenness and all bad manners because I suffer from it. I know there is no more sensitive creature in the whole world than I am." "Whatever is that: a sensitive creature?" an enthusiast asked the Roman candle. ...

"A creature that always steps on the feet of others because it has corns of its own," answered the Roman candle in a whisper; and the enthusiast wanted to burst with laughter.

"Please, what are you laughing at?" probed the rocket. ...

"I'm not laughing after all. "I'm laughing because I'm happy," said the enthusiast.

"That's a very selfish reason," said the rocket angry. "What right have you to be happy? You should think of others. You should think of me. I always think of myself and expect everyone else to do the same. That's what's called sympathy. It is a beautiful virtue, and I possess it in a high degree. Let us assume, for example, that something happened to me tonight - what a misfortune it would be for everyone! The prince and princess would never be happy again, their whole marital life would be destroyed, and the king would not get away with it, I know that. Truly, as often as I begin to think about the meaning of my standing, I am moved to tears. "If you want to give pleasure to others," shouted the Roman candle, "it's better to keep yourself dry. "The ordinary mind advises this," said the Bengal light, which came into a better mood.

"The ordinary mind, however," the rocket said indignantly; "but you forget that I am very unusual and special. Anyone can have an ordinary mind, provided he has no imagination. But I have imagination, for I never think of things as they really are; I always think of them very differently and in another way. And as far as keeping dry is concerned, there is obviously not a single one here who has any idea of how to protect a sensitive nature. Fortunately, I don't care a fig for it. The only thing that helps you through life is the awareness of the tremendous inferiority of all others, and that is a feeling I have always cultivated. Without a doubt, not one of you has a heart. You laugh here and perform antics, just as if the prince and the princess weren't getting married." "Yes, but why not?" exclaimed a small fireball. "Why not? The wedding is a most joyous occasion, and when I float up into the air, I intend to tell the stars all about it. You'll see them twinkle when I tell them about the pretty bride." "What a petty view of life you have," said the rocket.

"But I expected nothing less from you. There's nothing in you; you're hollow and empty. 0 Perhaps the prince and princess will one day live in a country where there is a deep river, and perhaps they will also have a single son, a small blonde-curly boy with violet eyes, like the prince himself; he may one day go out with his wet nurse, and the wet nurse falls asleep under a large lilac tree; and then the boy may fall into the river and drown. What a horrible misfortune. Poor people who lose their only child like that! It is so sad! I will never get over it !" "But they haven't lost their only child at all" said the Roman candle. "No misfortune at all has happened to them." "I didn't even suggest that," the rocket replied, "I only said it could happen. If they had really lost their only son, there would be no point in talking about it anymore. I hate people who cry over spilled milk. But when I think that they could lose their only son, it affects me very much". "You, of course," shouted the Bengal fire, "but you are also the most affected creature I've ever met. "And you're the most brutal creature I've ever met," said the rocket, "and of course you can't understand my friendship with the prince." "You don't even know him," growled the Roman candle.

"I never said I knew him," replied the rocket. "I even claim I wouldn't be his friend if I knew him. It's a very dangerous thing to know your friends." "Better take care to keep yourself dry," said the flare, "that's the main thing." "For you, I'm convinced," the rocket remarked; "but I cry when I please." And now it actually burst into real tears, running down the stick like raindrops, such that two little beetles, just thinking of starting their own home and looking for a dry spot for it, almost drowned in it.

"It must really be very romantic," said the pinwheel. "for it weeps where there is nothing to cry about", and it gave a deep sigh and thought of its wooden box.

But the Roman candle and the Bengal fire were very indignant and shouted very loudly, "Deceiver! Fake!" They were extremely practical, and when something didn't suit them, they always called it fake.

Then the moon rose like a wonderful silver shield, and the stars began to shine, and music sounded from the palace.

The prince and princess led the dance. They danced so beautifully that the tall white lilies looked in through the window, and the big red poppies swayed their heads and beat to the rhythm.

Then the clock struck ten and then eleven and then twelve, and with the last stroke of midnight they all came out onto the terrace, and the king sent for the court pyrotechnician.

"The fireworks are to begin," said the king, and the court pyrotechnician made a deep bow and went over to the end of the park. He had six assistants with him, and each of them carried a burning torch on a long pole.

It was a magnificent spectacle.

"Whiz! ... Whiz!" went the pinwheel when it turned around and around. ... "Bang! Boom!" the Roman candle roared. Then the swarms danced all over the square, and the Bengal fire made everything scarlet red. "Farewell!" shouted the fireball as it whirled away and sent down little blue sparks. "Crack! Crack answered the fire frogs, who had greatly amused themselves. So each one had a great success with the exception of the remarkable rocket. It had become so wet from crying that it could not be flown up at all. For the best thing about her was the gunpowder, and it was so wet with tears that it failed. All her poor relatives, to whom she never spoke other than with a scornful smile, ascended into the sky like wonderful golden flowers with fiery blossoms. "Cheer! Hooray!" the court shouted, and the little princess laughed loudly with pleasure.

"I suspect they're saving me for a particularly big occasion," said the rocket; "yeah, that's it," and she looked haughtier than ever.

The next morning the workers came to get everything back in order. "That is certainly a delegation, I want to receive it with due dignity," said the rocket, sticking its nose up into the air and frowning severely, as if thinking about something very important. But people didn't notice it at all. It wasn't until they wanted to leave that it was discovered by someone. "There is another bad rocket," he cried and threw it over the wall into the ditch.

"Bad rocket? Bad rocket?" it said, whirling through the air. "Impossible! Nice rocket the man said of course. Nice and bad, that sounds so similar and is often the same," and it fell into the mud.

"It's not comfortable here," it remarked; "but it'll probably be some fashionable seaside resort, and they sent me here to strengthen my weakened health. My nerves are undoubtedly a little irritated and I need rest." Then a small frog with shiny yellow eyes and a green speckled skin swam towards it.

"Probably a new guest!" the frog said. "There' s really nothing like the mud. You see, if I have only rainy weather and a ditch, so I'm perfectly happy. Do you think, it'll rain this afternoon? I'd like to wish it very much, but the sky is quite blue and there isn't a cloud on it. What a pity!" " Ahem! Ahem!" the rocket said and started to cough.

"What a beautiful voice you have," the frog shouted. "It sounds exactly like from a crow and for me it is the most beautiful music of the world. You should hear our chorus tonight! We have our location in the old , murky duck pond next to the tenant house and as soon as the moon rises, we start. It is so fascinating that people lie awake in bed to listen to us. Only yesterday I heard the tenant woman say to her mother that she couldn't sleep all night because of us. It makes you happy to be so popular." "Ahem! Ahem!" said the rocket angry. She was terribly upset that she couldn't say a word between.

"A exquisite voice," continued the frog. "Hopefully you'll come over to the murky duck pool some day. Now I have to check on my daughters. I have six beautiful daughters and fear the pike would like to meet them. He is a perfect monster and wouldn't think for a moment to eat them for breakfast. So, goodbye! I can assure you that our conversation has delighted me very much." "A nice conversation, that," said the rocket. "You've been talking alone all this time. I don't call that conversation." "One has to listen," the frog replied, "and I'm happy to do the talking. This will save time and won't let a quarrel arise." "But I like arguing," said the rocket.

"Hopefully not," the frog said politely. "Dispute is something ordinary, because in good society everyone has the same opinion. So again: goodbye - over there are my daughters"; and the little frog swam away.

You are a pushy person," said the rocket, "and without any education. I hate people who like you always talk about themselves when you want to talk about yourself like I do. That's what I call egoism, and egoism is something quite horrible, especially for someone of my temperament, for I'm popular because of my likable nature. You really should take an example from me, you couldn't find a better role model. And now, when the opportunity presents itself, you should take it, for very soon I'm going back to the court, where I am very popular. In my honor, the prince and princess were married yesterday. Of course, you don't know anything about all this, because you are from the country." "There's no point in telling him anything," said a dragonfly sitting on a big brown rush, "there's no point, because he's already gone." "That's his pity, not mine," the rocket replied.

I'm not thinking of just talking to him or stopping because he's not listening. I love to hear myself speak. It's my greatest pleasure. I often have long conversations with myself, and I am so clever that sometimes I don't understand a word of anything I'm saying." "Then you should give lectures on philosophy," said the dragonfly; and she spread out a pair of delightful gauze wings and buzzed away.

"How foolish of her not to stay," said the rocket. "I'm convinced she doesn't often find such an opportunity to do something for her education. But after all, I don't care. A genius like me sooner or later finds his "recognition"; and she sank a little deeper into the mud.

After a while, a big white duck swam to him. She had yellow legs and webbed feet and was considered a great beauty for her waddling.

"Quak, quak, quak," she said, "what a strange frame you are! May I ask whether you were born that way or whether it was the result of an accident? "It's clear that you've always lived only in the countryside," the rocket noted, "otherwise you would know who I am. By the way, I forgive your ignorance. It would be inequitable to ask other people to be as unusual and extraordinary as you are. It will undoubtedly surprise you to hear that I can fly to the sky and come back down to earth in a shower of golden rain." "I don't think much of that," said the duck, "because I don't see what it's good for. Yes, if you could plow the fields like an ox or pull a cart like a horse or tend sheep like a sheperd dog, that would be something." "Oh poor thing!" shouted the rocket very arrogantly. "I see that you're a subordinate. Someone of my rank is never useful. We have a certain education, and that is more than enough. I have no sympathy for any activity, least of all for one you seem to recommend. I've always been of the opinion that only those people who have nothing to do resort to work." "Yeah, yeah," said the duck, which was very peaceful and never started a fight with anyone, "yeah, yeah, the taste is different. But I do hope you'll settle here all the time, won't you?" "I wouldn't think of it!" the rocket shouted. "I'm just visiting here, a distinguished visitor. ... And find the place highly boring. There's neither company nor solitude here. It's like a suburb. I will probably go back to the court, for I know I am destined to create a sensation in the world." "I had also once thought about entering public life," the duck remarked; "there are so many things that need reform. I really did chair an assembly once, and we passed resolutions condemning everything we didn't want to suffer, but it seems that they didn't achieve much. Now I am completely absorbed in domesticity and only take care of my family." "I am made for public life," said the rocket, "me and all my relatives down to the smallest of them. Whenever we appear, we cause a sensation. I haven't performed publicly myself yet, but when it comes it will be a beautiful sight. As for domesticity, it makes you old early and distracts you from higher things." "Oh yes, the higher things of life, they are beautiful!" said the duck. "And that reminds me of how hungry I am." And she swam down the creek and went "Quak, quak, quak".

"Do come back! Come back!" shouted the rocket. "I still have a lot to say to you;" but the duck didn't care about her anymore.

"I'm glad she's gone," said the rocket, "she's decided for something lower middle class," and it sank a little deeper into the mud and began to think about the loneliness of genius when suddenly two little boys in white gowns came running down the ditch with a kettle and a bundle of twigs.

"That must be the delegation," said the rocket, trying to look very worthy.

"Holla," cried one of the boys, "look at the old stick! "How he probably got there," and he pulled the rocket out of the mud.

"Old stick?" said the rocket. "Nonsense! He said golden stick, of course, and that's a big compliment. He probably thinks I'm a court dignitary." " We want to put it into the fire," said the other boy, " then our pot will boil faster." So they straightened the brushwood, put the rocket on top and lit a fire.

"That's wonderful!" shouted the rocket. "They let me rise in broad daylight so that everyone can see me." "Now we want to sleep a little," said the boys, " and when we wake up the water will boil." And they lay down in the grass and closed their eyes.

The rocket was very damp, and it took a long time to catch fire. Finally it started to burn.

"Now I'm getting on!" called the rocket and made himself all stiff and straight. "I know that I will rise much higher than the stars, much higher than the moon, much higher than the sun. I will climb so high that ..." "Fizz! Fizz! "Fizz!" and she went straight up into the air. "Wonderful," she shouted. "And so it goes on for ever and ever. What a process!" But no one saw her.

There she felt a peculiar tingling sensation all over her body. "Now I'll explode!" she shouted. I'll set the whole world on fire and I'll make so much noise there that no one will be able to speak of anything else in one year." And it really exploded. "Bang! Bang! Pffft!" made the gunpowder. There was no doubt about it.

But no one heard it, not even the two little boys, because they were fast asleep.

"For God's sake," the goose shouted, "It's raining sticks!" and she shot into the water.

"I knew I'd make a big splash," breathed the rocket and went out.
unit 1
Die bedeutende Rakete.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 2
Des Königssohnes Hochzeit stand bevor, und darum war allgemeine Freude.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 3
Er hatte ein ganzes Jahr auf seine Braut gewartet, und nun war sie endlich gekommen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 6
Ihr langer Hermelinmantel reichte ihr bis an die Füße.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 8
So bleich war sie, daß alles Volk sich deshalb verwunderte, als sie durch die Straßen fuhr.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 9
»Wie eine weiße Rose ist sie!« rief man und warf von den Balkonen Blumen auf sie herab.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 10
Am Schloßtor ward sie vom Prinzen empfangen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 11
Er hatte verträumte Veilchenaugen, und sein Haar war wie feines Gold.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 12
Als er sie erblickte, sank er aufs Knie und küßte ihre Hand.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 17
Als die drei Tage um waren, wurde die Hochzeit gefeiert.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 19
Dann gab es eine Staatstafel, die fünf Stunden dauerte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 24
Er spielte sehr schlecht, aber niemand hatte je gewagt, ihm das zu sagen, weil er der König war.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 32
»Die Welt ist doch wahrhaftig zu schön!« rief ein kleiner Schwärmer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 33
»Sieh nur mal diese gelben Tulpen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 34
Wenn sie echte Knaller wären, könnten sie nicht schöner sein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 35
Ich bin doch sehr froh, daß ich gereist bin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 38
»Aber die Liebe ist nicht mehr Mode, und die Dichter haben sie getötet.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 39
Sie schrieben so viel über sie, daß ihnen niemand mehr glaubte, was mich nicht wundert.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 40
Denn wahre Liebe leidet und schweigt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 42
Die ist wie der Mond und lebt ewig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 43
Die Braut und der Bräutigam zum Beispiel lieben einander sehr.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 45
»Die Romantik ist tot, die Romantik ist tot, die Romantik ist tot«, sagte es leise.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 47
Plötzlich hörte man ein scharfes, trockenes Husten, und alles schaute sich um.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 49
Sie hustete jedesmal, bevor sie eine Bemerkung machte, um so die Aufmerksamkeit zu erregen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 50
»Ehem!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 52
Ruhe!« schrie ein Schwärmer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 54
»Ganz tot«, flüsterte das Feuerrad und schlief ein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 55
Sobald vollkommene Stille herrschte, hustete die Rakete zum drittenmal und begann.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 57
Sie hatte tatsächlich höchst vornehme Manieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 60
Ich bin eine sehr besondere Rakete und stamme von ganz besonderen Eltern ab.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 61
Meine Mutter war das gefeiertste Feuerrad ihrer Zeit und berühmt für ihr graziöses Tanzen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 63
Sie hatte drei und einen halben Fuß im Durchmesser und war aus bestem Schießpulver.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 64
Mein Vater war eine Rakete wie ich und von französischer Abkunft.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 65
Er flog so hoch, daß man fürchtete, er würde nie mehr wieder herunterkommen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 67
Die Zeitungen schrieben über seine Leistung in den schmeichelhaftesten Ausdrücken.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 72
Ich hasse Roheit und alle schlechten Manieren, denn ich leide darunter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 75
»Bitte, worüber lachen Sie denn?« forschte die Rakete.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 76
»Ich lache doch nicht.« »Ich lache, weil ich glücklich bin«, sagte der Schwärmer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 77
»Das ist ein sehr egoistischer Grund«, sagte die Rakete geärgert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 78
»Was für ein Recht haben Sie, glücklich zu sein?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 79
Sie sollten an andere denken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 80
Sie sollten an mich denken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 81
Ich denke immer an mich und erwarte von allen andern, daß sie das gleiche tun.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 82
Das ist das, was man Sympathie nennt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 83
Es ist eine schöne Tugend, und ich besitze sie in hohem Grade.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 88
Gewöhnlichen Verstand kann jeder haben, vorausgesetzt, er hat keine Phantasie.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 91
Glücklicherweise mache ich mir nichts daraus.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 93
Herz hat von euch ja niemand.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 95
»Weshalb denn nicht?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 98
»Aber ich habe von dir nichts anderes erwartet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 99
Es steckt nichts in dir; du bist hohl und leer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 101
Was für ein schreckliches Unglück!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 102
Arme Menschen, die ihr einziges Kind so verlieren!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 103
Es ist zu traurig!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 107
Ich hasse Menschen, die wegen verschütteter Milch ein Geschrei machen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 109
»Ich habe nie behauptet, daß ich ihn kenne«, antwortete die Rakete.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 110
»Ich behaupte sogar, daß ich sicher sein Freund nicht wäre, wenn ich ihn kennen würde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 112
»Sie muß wirklich sehr romantisch veranlagt sein«, sagte das Feuerrad.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 117
Der Prinz und die Prinzessin führten den Tanz.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 122
Es war ein herrliches Schauspiel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 123
»Uitz!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 5 days ago
unit 124
Uitz!« machte das Feuerrad, als es sich immer rundum drehte.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 125
»Bumm!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 126
Bumm!« dröhnte die römische Kerze.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 128
unit 129
»Krak!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 130
Krak!« antworteten die Feuerfrösche, die sich herrlich amüsierten.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 131
So hatte jedes einen großen Erfolg mit Ausnahme der bedeutenden Rakete.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 132
Sie war vom Weinen so feucht geworden, daß sie überhaupt nicht auffliegen konnte.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 133
unit 135
»Hurra!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 136
Hurra!« rief der Hof, und die kleine Prinzessin lachte laut auf vor Vergnügen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 138
Am nächsten Morgen kamen die Arbeitsleute, um alles wieder in Ordnung zu bringen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 140
Aber die Leute nahmen gar keine Notiz von ihr.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 141
Erst als sie weggehen wollten, erblickte sie einer.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 142
»Da ist noch eine schlechte Rakete«, rief er und warf sie über die Mauer in den Graben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 143
»Schlechte Rakete?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 144
Schlechte Rakete?« sagte sie, als sie durch die Luft wirbelte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 145
»Unmöglich!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 146
Schöne Rakete hat der Mann natürlich gesagt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 147
Schön und schlecht, das klingt so ähnlich und ist oft dasselbe«, und sie fiel in den Schlamm.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 150
»Ein neuer Gast wohl!« sagte der Frosch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 151
»Es geht ja auch wahrhaftig nichts über den Schlamm.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 152
Sehen Sie, hab' ich nur regnerisches Wetter und einen Graben, so bin ich vollkommen glücklich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 153
Glauben Sie, daß es heut nachmittag regnen wird?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 154
Ich möcht' es sehr wünschen; aber der Himmel ist ganz blau, und kein Wölkchen ist darauf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 155
Wie schade!« »Ehem!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 156
Ehem!« sagte die Rakete und begann zu husten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 157
»Was Sie für eine schöne Stimme haben!« rief der Frosch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 158
»Sie klingt genau wie von einer Krähe, und die ist für mich die schönste Musik der Welt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 159
Sie sollten heut abend unsern Gesangverein hören!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 161
Es ist so hinreißend, daß die Menschen wach im Bett liegen, um uns zuzuhören.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 163
Es freut einen doch sehr, wenn man so beliebt ist.« »Ehem!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 164
Ehem!« sagte die Rakete geärgert.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 165
Sie ärgerte sich schrecklich, daß sie kein Wort dazwischenreden konnte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 166
»Eine köstliche Stimme«, fuhr der Frosch fort.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 167
»Hoffentlich kommen Sie einmal zum Entenpfuhl 'rüber.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 168
Jetzt muß ich nach meinen Töchtern sehen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 169
Ich habe nämlich sechs schöne Tochter und fürchte, der Hecht möchte ihnen begegnen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 171
Also, auf Wiedersehen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 173
»Sie haben die ganze Zeit allein gesprochen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 176
»Hoffentlich nicht«, sagte der Frosch höflich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 179
Sie sind eine aufdringliche Person«, sagte die Rakete, »und ohne jede Erziehung.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 180
Ich hasse Leute, die wie Sie immer von sich selbst reden, wenn man wie ich von sich reden will.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 184
Mir zu Ehren wurden gestern der Prinz und die Prinzessin verheiratet.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 187
Ich höre mich selbst sehr gern sprechen Es ist mein größtes Vergnügen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 189
»Wie töricht von ihr, daß sie nicht hierblieb«, sagte die Rakete.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 191
Aber mir ist das schließlich gleichgültig.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 193
Nach einer Weile kam eine große weiße Ente angeschwommen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 195
»Quak, quak, quak«, sagte sie, »was für ein komisches Gestell du bist!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 197
Übrigens verzeihe ich Ihnen Ihre Unwissenheit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 201
»Ich sehe, daß Sie zum untern Stand gehören.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 202
Jemand von meinem Rang ist nie nützlich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 203
Wir haben eine gewisse Bildung, und das ist mehr als genügend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 207
»Ich bin nur zu Besuch hier, ein vornehmer Besuch.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 208
Und finde den Ort höchst langweilig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 209
Hier ist weder Gesellschaft noch Einsamkeit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 210
Es ist wie in einer Vorstadt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 214
Wenn immer wir erscheinen, erregen wir Aufsehen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 218
»Komm doch zurück!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 219
Komm zurück!« schrie die Rakete.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 220
unit 222
»Das muß die Deputation sein«, sagte die Rakete und versuchte sehr würdig dreinzuschauen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 223
»Holla«, rief einer der Buben, »schau mal da den alten Stecken!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 224
Wie der wohl dahergekommen ist«, und er holte die Rakete aus dem Schlamm heraus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 225
»Alter Stecken?« sagte die Rakete.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 226
»Unsinn!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 227
Er sagte natürlich goldener Stock, und das ist ein großes Kompliment.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 229
»Das ist herrlich!« rief die Rakete.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 231
Die Rakete war sehr feucht, und es brauchte eine lange Weile, bis sie Feuer fing.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 232
Endlich kam sie doch ins Brennen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 233
»Jetzt steig' ich auf!« rief die Rakete und machte sich ganz steif und gerade.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 235
Ich werde so hoch steigen, daß ...« »Fizz!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 236
Fizz!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 237
Fizz!«, und sie stieg kerzengerade in die Luft.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 238
»Herrlich«, rief sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 239
»Und so geht's nun weiter in alle Ewigkeit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 240
Was ein Sukzeß!« Aber niemand sah sie.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 241
Da fühlte sie ein eigentümliches Prickeln im ganzen Leibe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 242
»Jetzt werde ich explodieren!« rief sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 244
»Krach!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 245
Krach!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 246
Pffft!« machte das Schießpulver.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 247
Darüber gab's keinen Zweifel.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 248
unit 249
»Um Gottes willen«, schrie die Gans auf, »es regnet Stöcke!«, und sie schoß ins Wasser.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 250
»Ich wußte doch, ich würde ein riesiges Aufsehen machen«, hauchte die Rakete und ging aus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented  22 hours ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 245  1 week, 6 days ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 244  1 week, 6 days ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 173  1 week, 6 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 173  2 weeks, 1 day ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 181  2 weeks, 2 days ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 179  2 weeks, 2 days ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 123  2 weeks, 2 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 111  2 weeks, 2 days ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 97  2 weeks, 2 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 14  2 weeks, 2 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 12  2 weeks, 2 days ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 99  2 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 44  2 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 40  2 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 78  2 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 62  2 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 88  2 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 86  2 weeks, 3 days ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 81  2 weeks, 3 days ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 78  2 weeks, 3 days ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 61  2 weeks, 3 days ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 47  2 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 50  2 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 50  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 21  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 7  2 weeks, 4 days ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 3  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 8  2 weeks, 5 days ago

This text is a German translation of the original short story 'The Remarkable Rocket' by Oscar Wilde.

by Merlin57 22 hours ago

Die bedeutende Rakete.
Des Königssohnes Hochzeit stand bevor, und darum war allgemeine Freude. Er hatte ein ganzes Jahr auf seine Braut gewartet, und nun war sie endlich gekommen. Sie war eine russische Prinzessin, und ein Schlitten, von sechs Rentieren gezogen, hatte sie von Finnland hergebracht. Der Schlitten war geformt wie ein großer goldener Schwan, und zwischen des Schwanes Flügeln ruhte die kleine Prinzessin. Ihr langer Hermelinmantel reichte ihr bis an die Füße. Auf dem Kopf trug sie eine winzige Kappe aus silbernem Gewebe, und sie war so bleich wie der Schneepalast, in dem sie immer gewohnt hatte. So bleich war sie, daß alles Volk sich deshalb verwunderte, als sie durch die Straßen fuhr.

»Wie eine weiße Rose ist sie!« rief man und warf von den Balkonen Blumen auf sie herab.

Am Schloßtor ward sie vom Prinzen empfangen. Er hatte verträumte Veilchenaugen, und sein Haar war wie feines Gold.

Als er sie erblickte, sank er aufs Knie und küßte ihre Hand.

»Euer Bildnis war schön«, sagte er leise, »aber Ihr seid noch schöner als Euer Bildnis.« Und die kleine Prinzessin errötete.

»Sie war wie eine weiße Rose«, sagte ein junger Page zu einem andern, »nun ist sie wie eine rote Rose«, und der ganze Hof war entzückt.

Während der nächsten drei Tage sagte ein jeder: »Weiße Rose, rote Rose, rote Rose, weiße Rose«, und der König befahl, daß des Pagen Gehalt verdoppelt würde. Da er nun überhaupt keinen Gehalt bekam, nützte ihm das nicht viel, aber es galt für eine große Ehre und wurde vorschriftsmäßig in der Hofgazette bekanntgemacht.

Als die drei Tage um waren, wurde die Hochzeit gefeiert. Es war eine großartige Sache, und Braut und Bräutigam schritten Hand in Hand unter einem purpursamtnen, mit kleinen Perlen bestickten Baldachin. Dann gab es eine Staatstafel, die fünf Stunden dauerte. Der Prinz und die Prinzessin saßen obenan in der großen Halle und tranken aus einem kristallnen Pokal. Nur treu Liebende konnten aus diesem Pokal trinken, denn wie ihn Falsche Lippen berühren, wird er trüb und wolkig.

»Daß sie einander lieben«, sagte der kleine Page, »das ist so klar wie Kristall!« Und der König verdoppelte seinen Gehalt zum zweiten Male, und »Welche Ehre!« rief der ganze Hof.

Nach dem Bankett sollte ein Ball stattfinden, und das Brautpaar sollte den Rosentanz tanzen, und der König hatte versprochen, die Flöte zu spielen. Er spielte sehr schlecht, aber niemand hatte je gewagt, ihm das zu sagen, weil er der König war. Er konnte bloß drei Melodien und wußte nie genau, welche davon er spielte; aber das machte weiter nichts, denn was immer er auch tat, es rief stets jeder: »Herrlich! Entzückend!«

Die letzte Nummer auf dem Programm war ein großes Feuerwerk, das Punkt Mitternacht abgebrannt werden sollte. Die kleine Prinzessin hatte noch nie in ihrem Leben ein Feuerwerk gesehen, und so hatte der König Befehl gegeben, daß der königliche Pyrotechniker am Hochzeitstag zugegen sein sollte.

»Was ist das, ein Feuerwerk?« hatte sie den Prinzen gefragt, als sie eines Morgens auf der Terrasse spazierengingen.

»Es ist so wie das Nordlicht«, sagte der König, der immer Antwort auf Fragen gab, die an andere gestellt waren, »nur viel natürlicher. Mir ist es lieber als die Sterne, weil man immer ganz genau weiß, wann es losgeht, und es ist so schön wie mein Flötenspiel. Du mußt das unbedingt sehen.«

So war also ganz unten im königlichen Garten ein Stand aufgeschlagen worden, und sobald der königliche Pyrotechniker alles an seinen richtigen Platz gebracht hatte, begann das Feuerwerk untereinander sich zu unterhalten.

»Die Welt ist doch wahrhaftig zu schön!« rief ein kleiner Schwärmer. »Sieh nur mal diese gelben Tulpen. Wenn sie echte Knaller wären, könnten sie nicht schöner sein. Ich bin doch sehr froh, daß ich gereist bin. Reisen bildet den Geist und räumt gründlich mit allen Vorurteilen auf.«

»Des Königs Garten ist nicht die Welt, du verrückter Schwärmer!« sagte eine große römische Kerze. »Die Welt ist ein riesengroßer Platz, und du würdest drei Tage brauchen, um sie ganz zu sehen.«

»Jeder Platz, den man liebt, ist für einen die Welt«, meinte ein nachdenkliches Feuerrad, das seit seiner Kindheit an einer alten Spanschachtel befestigt war und sich mit seinem gebrochenen Herzen brüstete. »Aber die Liebe ist nicht mehr Mode, und die Dichter haben sie getötet. Sie schrieben so viel über sie, daß ihnen niemand mehr glaubte, was mich nicht wundert. Denn wahre Liebe leidet und schweigt. Ich erinnere mich, wie ich selbst einmal ... Aber darum kümmert sich jetzt niemand – die Romantik gehört der Vergangenheit an.«

»Unsinn«, sagte die römische Kerze, »die Romantik stirbt nie. Die ist wie der Mond und lebt ewig. Die Braut und der Bräutigam zum Beispiel lieben einander sehr. Ich hörte alles über sie heut morgen von einer braunen Kartätsche, die zufällig in demselben Schubfach lag wie ich und die letzten Hofneuigkeiten wußte.«

Aber das Feuerrad schüttelte den Kopf. »Die Romantik ist tot, die Romantik ist tot, die Romantik ist tot«, sagte es leise. Das Rad gehörte zu den Leuten, die glauben, daß, wenn sie dieselbe Sache mehrmals sagen, sie am Ende wahr wird.

Plötzlich hörte man ein scharfes, trockenes Husten, und alles schaute sich um.

Es kam von einer großen, hochmütig aussehenden Rakete, die an das Ende eines langen Stockes gebunden war. Sie hustete jedesmal, bevor sie eine Bemerkung machte, um so die Aufmerksamkeit zu erregen.

»Ehem! Ehem!« sagte sie, und alles horchte mit Ausnahme des Feuerrades, das noch immer den Kopf schüttelte und leise dabeiblieb:

»Die Romantik ist tot.«

»Ruhe! Ruhe!« schrie ein Schwärmer. Er war so etwas wie ein Politiker und hatte bei den Wahlen immer eine große Rolle gespielt, und daher kannte er die richtigen parlamentarischen Ausdrücke.

»Ganz tot«, flüsterte das Feuerrad und schlief ein. Sobald vollkommene Stille herrschte, hustete die Rakete zum drittenmal und begann. Sie sprach langsam und deutlich, als ob sie ihre Memoiren diktierte, und blickte die, zu denen sie sprach, immer über die Schulter an. Sie hatte tatsächlich höchst vornehme Manieren.

»Wie glücklich trifft es sich für den Königssohn«, bemerkte sie, »daß er gerade an dem Tag Hochzeit macht, an dem ich losgelassen werden soll. Selbst wenn es vorher so arrangiert worden wäre, hätte es sich für ihn nicht besser treffen können; aber Prinzen haben eben immer Glück.«

»Mein Gott«, sagte der kleine Schwärmer, »ich dachte, es wäre gerade umgekehrt, und wir würden zu Ehren des Prinzen losgelassen.«

»Das mag ja mit Ihnen so der Fall sein«, antwortete sie, »und es ist zweifelsohne der Fall, aber mit mir ist es doch etwas anders. Ich bin eine sehr besondere Rakete und stamme von ganz besonderen Eltern ab. Meine Mutter war das gefeiertste Feuerrad ihrer Zeit und berühmt für ihr graziöses Tanzen. Als sie öffentlich auftrat, drehte sie sich neunzehnmal, bevor sie ausging, und bei jeder Drehung warf sie sieben rosafarbene Sterne in die Luft. Sie hatte drei und einen halben Fuß im Durchmesser und war aus bestem Schießpulver. Mein Vater war eine Rakete wie ich und von französischer Abkunft. Er flog so hoch, daß man fürchtete, er würde nie mehr wieder herunterkommen. Er kam aber doch, denn er war eine liebenswürdige Natur, und machte einen glänzenden Absturz in einem Schauer von goldnem Regen. Die Zeitungen schrieben über seine Leistung in den schmeichelhaftesten Ausdrücken. Die Hofgazette nannte ihn einen Triumph der Pylotechnik.«

»Pyrotechnik meinst du, Pyrotechnik«, sagte ein bengalisches Licht.

»Ich weiß, es heißt Pyrotechnik, denn so sah ich es auf meiner eigenen Büchse geschrieben.«

»Also ich sage Pylotechnik«, antwortete die Rakete in strengem Tone, und das bengalische Licht fühlte sich davon so zermalmt, daß es sofort die kleinen Schwärmer einzuschüchtern begann, um zu zeigen, daß es noch immer eine Person von einiger Bedeutung wäre.

»Ich sagte«, fuhr die Rakete fort, »ich sagte – ja, was sagte ich doch?«

»Du sprachst von dir«, antwortete die römische Kerze.

»Natürlich; ich wußte doch, daß ich von einem interessanten Gegenstand sprach, als ich so unmanierlich unterbrochen wurde. Ich hasse Roheit und alle schlechten Manieren, denn ich leide darunter. Ich weiß, auf der ganzen Welt gibt es kein sensitiveres Geschöpf, als ich bin.«

»Was ist denn das: ein sensitives Geschöpf?« fragte ein Schwärmer das römische Licht.

»Ein Geschöpf, das andern immer auf die Füße tritt, weil es selber Hühneraugen hat«, antwortete die römische Kerze im Flüsterton; und der Schwärmer wollte platzen vor Lachen.

»Bitte, worüber lachen Sie denn?« forschte die Rakete.

»Ich lache doch nicht.«

»Ich lache, weil ich glücklich bin«, sagte der Schwärmer.

»Das ist ein sehr egoistischer Grund«, sagte die Rakete geärgert. »Was für ein Recht haben Sie, glücklich zu sein? Sie sollten an andere denken. Sie sollten an mich denken. Ich denke immer an mich und erwarte von allen andern, daß sie das gleiche tun. Das ist das, was man Sympathie nennt. Es ist eine schöne Tugend, und ich besitze sie in hohem Grade. Nehmen wir zum Beispiel an, mir passierte heute nacht etwas – was für ein Unglück wäre das für einen jeden! Der Prinz und die Prinzessin würden niemals wieder glücklich sein können, ihr ganzes eheliches Leben wäre zerstört, und der König würde nicht darüber wegkommen, das weiß ich. Wahrhaftig, sooft ich über die Bedeutung meiner Stellung nachzudenken beginne, bin ich gerührt bis zu Tränen.«

»Wenn du andern Vergnügen machen willst«, rief die römische Kerze, »ist's besser, du hältst dich trocken.«

»Dazu rät doch der gewöhnliche Verstand«, meinte das bengalische Licht, das in bessere Laune kam.

»Der gewöhnliche Verstand, allerdings«, entrüstete sich die Rakete; »aber Sie vergessen, daß ich sehr ungewöhnlich und besonders bin. Gewöhnlichen Verstand kann jeder haben, vorausgesetzt, er hat keine Phantasie. Aber ich habe Phantasie, denn ich denke an die Dinge nie, wie sie wirklich sind; ich denke mir sie immer ganz verschieden und anders. Und was das Trockenhalten betrifft, so ist hier offenbar kein einziger, der überhaupt eine empfindsame Natur zu schützen weiß. Glücklicherweise mache ich mir nichts daraus. Das einzige, was einem durch das Leben hilft, ist das Bewußtsein von der ungeheuren Inferiorität aller andern, und das ist ein Gefühl, das ich immer kultiviert habe. Herz hat von euch ja niemand. Ihr lacht hier und treibt Possen, geradeso, als ob der Prinz und die Prinzessin nicht Hochzeit machten.«

»Ja, aber weshalb denn nicht?« rief eine kleine Feuerkugel aus. »Weshalb denn nicht? Die Hochzeit ist doch eine höchst freudige Gelegenheit, und wenn ich in die Luft hinaufschwebe, habe ich mir vorgenommen, den Sternen alles darüber zu berichten. Du wirst sie zwinkern sehen, wenn ich ihnen von der hübschen Braut erzähle.«

»Was für eine triviale Lebensauffassung du hast!« sagte die Rakete.

»Aber ich habe von dir nichts anderes erwartet. Es steckt nichts in dir; du bist hohl und leer. Vielleicht wohnen der Prinz und die Prinzessin einmal in einem Lande, wo ein tiefer Fluß ist, und vielleicht haben sie auch einen einzigen Sohn, einen kleinen blondlockigen Knaben mit Veilchenaugen wie der Prinz selber; der geht vielleicht eines Tages mit seiner Amme aus, und die Amme schläft unter einem großen Fliederbaum ein; und dann fällt der Knabe vielleicht in den Fluß und ertrinkt. Was für ein schreckliches Unglück! Arme Menschen, die ihr einziges Kind so verlieren! Es ist zu traurig! Ich werde es niemals verwinden!«

»Aber sie haben ja gar nicht ihr einziges Kind verloren!« sagte die römische Kerze. »Es ist ihnen überhaupt kein Unglück passiert.«

»Das habe ich auch gar nicht behauptet«, antwortete die Rakete, »ich sagte nur, es könnte passieren. Wenn sie ihren einzigen Sohn wirklich verloren hätten, dann hätte es gar keinen Zweck mehr, davon zu sprechen. Ich hasse Menschen, die wegen verschütteter Milch ein Geschrei machen. Aber wenn ich denke, daß sie ihren einzigen Sohn verlieren könnten, so affiziert mich das sehr.«

»Dich natürlich«, rief das bengalische Feuer, »du bist aber auch das affektierteste Geschöpf, das mir je vorgekommen ist.«

»Und du bist das brutalste Geschöpf, dem ich je begegnet bin«, sagte die Rakete, »und kannst meine Freundschaft für den Prinzen selbstverständlich nicht begreifen.«

»Du kennst ihn ja gar nicht«, knurrte die römische Kerze.

»Ich habe nie behauptet, daß ich ihn kenne«, antwortete die Rakete. »Ich behaupte sogar, daß ich sicher sein Freund nicht wäre, wenn ich ihn kennen würde. Es ist eine sehr gefährliche Sache, seine Freunde zu kennen.«

»Gib lieber darauf acht, dich trocken zu halten«, sagte die Leuchtkugel, »das ist die Hauptsache.«

»Für dich wohl, davon bin ich überzeugt«, bemerkte die Rakete; »aber ich weine, wann es mir beliebt.« Und jetzt brach sie tatsächlich in wirkliche Tränen aus, die den Stab herunterliefen wie Regentropfen, so daß zwei kleine Käfer beinahe darin ertrunken wären, die gerade daran dachten, sich ein eigenes Heim zu gründen und sich nach einer trockenen Stelle dafür umsahen.

»Sie muß wirklich sehr romantisch veranlagt sein«, sagte das Feuerrad. »denn sie weint, wo gar nichts zu weinen ist«, und es stieß einen tiefen Seufzer aus und dachte an seine Spanschachtel.

Aber die römische Kerze und das bengalische Feuer waren sehr indigniert und riefen ganz laut: »Schwindel! Schwindel!« Sie waren außerordentlich praktisch gesinnt, und wenn ihnen etwas nicht paßte, nannten sie es immer gleich Schwindel.

Da ging der Mond auf wie ein wundervoller silberner Schild, und die Sterne begannen zu leuchten, und Musik tönte vom Palast her.

Der Prinz und die Prinzessin führten den Tanz. Sie tanzten so schön, daß die hohen weißen Lilien durch das Fenster hinein zuschauten, und die großen roten Klatschrosen wiegten die Köpfe und schlugen den Takt.

Dann tönte die Uhr zehn und dann elf und dann zwölf, und mit dem letzten Schlag Mitternacht kamen sie alle heraus auf die Terrasse, und der König schickte nach dem Hofpyrotechniker.

»Das Feuerwerk soll beginnen«, sagte der König, und der Hofpyrotechniker machte eine tiefe Verbeugung und begab sich hinüber an das Ende des Parkes. Er hatte sechs Gehilfen bei sich, und jeder von ihnen trug an einer langer Stange eine brennende Fackel.

Es war ein herrliches Schauspiel.

»Uitz! Uitz!« machte das Feuerrad, als es sich immer rundum drehte. »Bumm! Bumm!« dröhnte die römische Kerze. Dann tanzten die Schwärmer über den ganzen Platz, und das bengalische Feuer machte alles scharlachrot. »Lebt wohl!« rief die Feuerkugel, als sie fortschwirrte und kleine blaue Funken niederschickte. »Krak! Krak!« antworteten die Feuerfrösche, die sich herrlich amüsierten. So hatte jedes einen großen Erfolg mit Ausnahme der bedeutenden Rakete. Sie war vom Weinen so feucht geworden, daß sie überhaupt nicht auffliegen konnte. Denn das Beste an ihr war das Schießpulver, und das war von den Tränen so naß, daß es versagte. Alle ihre armseligen Verwandten, zu denen sie nie anders als mit einem höhnischen Lächeln sprach, stiegen zum Himmel auf wie wundervolle goldene Blumen mit feurigen Blüten. »Hurra! Hurra!« rief der Hof, und die kleine Prinzessin lachte laut auf vor Vergnügen.

»Ich vermute, sie heben mich für eine ganz besonders große Gelegenheit auf«, sagte die Rakete; »jaja, so ist es«, und sie sah hochmütiger aus als je.

Am nächsten Morgen kamen die Arbeitsleute, um alles wieder in Ordnung zu bringen. »Das ist sicher eine Deputation, ich will sie mit gebührender Würde empfangen«, sagte die Rakete und steckte die Nase hoch in die Luft und runzelte streng die Stirn, als ob sie über etwas sehr Wichtiges nachdächte. Aber die Leute nahmen gar keine Notiz von ihr. Erst als sie weggehen wollten, erblickte sie einer. »Da ist noch eine schlechte Rakete«, rief er und warf sie über die Mauer in den Graben.

»Schlechte Rakete? Schlechte Rakete?« sagte sie, als sie durch die Luft wirbelte. »Unmöglich! Schöne Rakete hat der Mann natürlich gesagt. Schön und schlecht, das klingt so ähnlich und ist oft dasselbe«, und sie fiel in den Schlamm.

»Behaglich ist es hier ja nicht«, bemerkte sie; »aber es wird wohl irgendein fashionabler Badeort sein, und sie haben mich hergeschickt, damit sich meine angegriffene Gesundheit kräftigt. Meine Nerven sind ohne Zweifel etwas irritiert, und ich brauche Ruhe.«

Da schwamm ein kleiner Frosch mit glänzenden gelben Augen und in einem grüngesprenkelten Rock auf sie zu.

»Ein neuer Gast wohl!« sagte der Frosch. »Es geht ja auch wahrhaftig nichts über den Schlamm. Sehen Sie, hab' ich nur regnerisches Wetter und einen Graben, so bin ich vollkommen glücklich. Glauben Sie, daß es heut nachmittag regnen wird? Ich möcht' es sehr wünschen; aber der Himmel ist ganz blau, und kein Wölkchen ist darauf. Wie schade!«

»Ehem! Ehem!« sagte die Rakete und begann zu husten.

»Was Sie für eine schöne Stimme haben!« rief der Frosch. »Sie klingt genau wie von einer Krähe, und die ist für mich die schönste Musik der Welt. Sie sollten heut abend unsern Gesangverein hören! Wir haben unsern Sitz in dem alten Entenpfuhl neben dem Pächterhaus, und sobald der Mond aufgeht, fangen wir an. Es ist so hinreißend, daß die Menschen wach im Bett liegen, um uns zuzuhören. Erst gestern hörte ich, wie die Pächtersfrau zu ihrer Mutter sagte, daß sie unsertwegen die ganze Nacht kein Auge zutun könnte. Es freut einen doch sehr, wenn man so beliebt ist.«

»Ehem! Ehem!« sagte die Rakete geärgert. Sie ärgerte sich schrecklich, daß sie kein Wort dazwischenreden konnte.

»Eine köstliche Stimme«, fuhr der Frosch fort. »Hoffentlich kommen Sie einmal zum Entenpfuhl 'rüber. Jetzt muß ich nach meinen Töchtern sehen. Ich habe nämlich sechs schöne Tochter und fürchte, der Hecht möchte ihnen begegnen. Er ist ein vollendetes Ungeheuer und würde sich keinen Augenblick bedenken, sie zum Frühstück zu verspeisen. Also, auf Wiedersehen! Ich kann Ihnen die Versicherung geben, daß mich unsere Unterhaltung sehr erfreut hat.«

»Eine nette Unterhaltung das«, sagte die Rakete. »Sie haben die ganze Zeit allein gesprochen. Das nenne ich keine Unterhaltung.«

»Einer muß zuhören«, antwortete der Frosch, »und ich übernehme das Sprechen gern. Das spart Zeit und läßt keinen Streit aufkommen.«

»Aber ich mag Streit gern«, sagte die Rakete.

»Hoffentlich nicht«, sagte der Frosch höflich. »Streit ist etwas ganz Ordinäres, denn in der guten Gesellschaft haben alle dieselbe Meinung. Also nochmals: auf Wiedersehen – da drüben sind meine Töchter«; und der kleine Frosch schwamm fort.

Sie sind eine aufdringliche Person«, sagte die Rakete, »und ohne jede Erziehung. Ich hasse Leute, die wie Sie immer von sich selbst reden, wenn man wie ich von sich reden will. Das nenne ich Egoismus, und Egoismus ist etwas ganz Abscheuliches, besonders für jemand von meinem Temperament, denn ich bin wegen meines sympathischen Naturells allgemein beliebt. Sie sollten sich wirklich an mir ein Beispiel nehmen, Sie könnten gar kein besseres Vorbild finden. Und jetzt, wo sich die Gelegenheit bietet, sollten Sie sie benützen, denn ich gehe sehr bald wieder zurück zu Hof, wo ich sehr beliebt bin. Mir zu Ehren wurden gestern der Prinz und die Prinzessin verheiratet. Natürlich wissen Sie von all dem nichts, denn Sie sind vom Lande.«

Es hat keinen Zweck, ihm was zu erzählen«, sagte eine Libelle, die auf einer großen braunen Binse saß, »gar keinen Zweck, denn er ist schon weg.«

Das ist sein Schade, nicht der meine«, erwiderte die Rakete.

Ich denke nicht daran, bloß deshalb mit ihm zu sprechen aufzuhören, weil er nicht zuhört. Ich höre mich selbst sehr gern sprechen Es ist mein größtes Vergnügen. Ich führe oft lange Unterhaltungen mit mir selber, und ich bin so gescheit, daß ich manchmal nicht ein Wort von all dem verstehe, was ich sage.«

»Dann sollten Sie Vorlesungen über Philosophie halten«, sagte die Libelle; und sie breitete ein paar entzückende Gazeflügel aus und schwirrte davon.

»Wie töricht von ihr, daß sie nicht hierblieb«, sagte die Rakete. »Ich bin überzeugt, sie findet nicht oft eine solche Gelegenheit, etwas für ihre Bildung zu tun. Aber mir ist das schließlich gleichgültig. Ein Genie wie ich findet früher oder später seine Anerkennung«; und sie sank noch ein bißchen tiefer in den Schlamm.

Nach einer Weile kam eine große weiße Ente angeschwommen. Sie hatte gelbe Beine und Schwimmhäute an den Füßen und galt für eine große Schönheit wegen ihres Watschelns.

»Quak, quak, quak«, sagte sie, »was für ein komisches Gestell du bist! Darf ich fragen, ob du schon so auf die Welt gekommen bist oder ob das die Folge eines Unfalls ist?«

»Es ist klar, daß Sie immer nur auf dem Lande gelebt haben«, bemerkte die Rakete, »sonst würden Sie wissen, wer ich bin. Übrigens verzeihe ich Ihnen Ihre Unwissenheit. Es wäre unbillig, von andern Leuten zu verlangen, daß Sie so ungewöhnlich und außerordentlich sind, wie man selber ist. Es wird Sie zweifellos überraschen, zu hören, daß ich zum Himmel fliegen und in einem Schauer von goldnem Regen wieder auf die Erde herunterkommen kann.«

»Davon halt' ich nicht viel«, sagte die Ente, »denn ich seh' nicht ein, wozu das gut sein soll. Ja, wenn du die Felder pflügen könntest wie der Ochse oder einen Wagen ziehen wie das Pferd oder die Schafe hüten wie der Schäferhund, das wäre noch was.«

»Ach Sie Ärmste!« rief die Rakete sehr überlegen. »Ich sehe, daß Sie zum untern Stand gehören. Jemand von meinem Rang ist nie nützlich. Wir haben eine gewisse Bildung, und das ist mehr als genügend. Ich habe keinerlei Sympathie für irgendwelche Tätigkeit, am allerwenigsten für eine, die Sie da zu empfehlen scheinen. Ich bin immer der Meinung gewesen, daß zur Arbeit nur jene Leute ihre Zuflucht nehmen, die gar nichts zu tun haben.«

»Jaja«, sagte die Ente, die sehr friedselig war und nie mit irgend jemandem Streit anfing, »jaja, der Geschmack ist verschieden. Aber ich hoffe doch, daß Sie sich hier dauernd niederlassen, nicht?«

»Fällt mir nicht ein!« rief die Rakete. »Ich bin nur zu Besuch hier, ein vornehmer Besuch. Und finde den Ort höchst langweilig. Hier ist weder Gesellschaft noch Einsamkeit. Es ist wie in einer Vorstadt. Wahrscheinlich geh' ich wieder zu Hof zurück, denn ich weiß, ich bin dazu bestimmt, Aufsehen in der Welt zu erregen.«

»Ich hatte mich auch einst mit dem Gedanken beschäftigt, ins öffentliche Leben zu treten«, bemerkte die Ente; »es gibt da so vieles, das reformbedürftig ist. Ich habe auch wirklich einmal den Vorsitz in einer Versammlung geführt, und wir faßten Resolutionen, die alles verurteilten, was wir nicht leiden mochten; aber es scheint, daß sie nicht viel erreicht haben. Jetzt geh' ich ganz in der Häuslichkeit auf und kümmere mich nur noch um meine Familie.«

»Ich bin für das öffentliche Leben geschaffen«, sagte die Rakete »ich und alle meine Verwandten bis zu den Geringsten von ihnen. Wenn immer wir erscheinen, erregen wir Aufsehen. Ich bin selbst noch nicht öffentlich aufgetreten, aber wenn es dazu kommt, wird es ein ganz herrlicher Anblick sein. Was die Häuslichkeit angeht, macht einen die früh alt und lenkt einen von den höheren Dingen ab.«

»Ach ja, die höheren Dinge des Lebens, die sind schön!« sagte die Ente. »Und das erinnert mich daran, wie hungrig ich bin.« Und sie schwamm den Bach hinunter und machte »Quak, quak, quak«.

»Komm doch zurück! Komm zurück!« schrie die Rakete. »Ich hab' dir noch eine ganze Menge zu sagen«; aber die Ente kümmerte sich gar nicht mehr um sie.

»Ich bin froh, daß sie fort ist«, sagte sich die Rakete, »sie hat entschieden was Kleinbürgerliches«, und sie sank noch ein bißchen tiefer in den Schlamm und begann über die Einsamkeit des Genies nachzudenken, als auf einmal zwei kleine Jungen in weißen Kitteln den Graben entlanggelaufen kamen, mit einem Kessel und einem Reisigbündel.

»Das muß die Deputation sein«, sagte die Rakete und versuchte sehr würdig dreinzuschauen.

»Holla«, rief einer der Buben, »schau mal da den alten Stecken! Wie der wohl dahergekommen ist«, und er holte die Rakete aus dem Schlamm heraus.

»Alter Stecken?« sagte die Rakete. »Unsinn! Er sagte natürlich goldener Stock, und das ist ein großes Kompliment. Er hält mich wahrscheinlich für einen Hofwürdenträger.«

»Wir wollen ihn ins Feuer legen«, sagte der andere Junge, »dann kocht unser Topf schneller.«

Also richteten sie das Reisig, legten die Rakete obendrauf und zündeten ein Feuer an.

»Das ist herrlich!« rief die Rakete. »Sie lassen mich bei hellem Tageslicht aufsteigen, damit mich jeder sehen kann.«

»Jetzt wollen wir ein wenig schlafen«, sagten die Jungen, »und wenn wir aufwachen, wird das Wasser kochen.« Und sie legten sich ins Gras und schlossen die Augen.

Die Rakete war sehr feucht, und es brauchte eine lange Weile, bis sie Feuer fing. Endlich kam sie doch ins Brennen.

»Jetzt steig' ich auf!« rief die Rakete und machte sich ganz steif und gerade. »Ich weiß, daß ich viel höher steigen werde als die Sterne, viel höher als der Mond, viel höher als die Sonne. Ich werde so hoch steigen, daß ...«

»Fizz! Fizz! Fizz!«, und sie stieg kerzengerade in die Luft. »Herrlich«, rief sie. »Und so geht's nun weiter in alle Ewigkeit. Was ein Sukzeß!«

Aber niemand sah sie.

Da fühlte sie ein eigentümliches Prickeln im ganzen Leibe. »Jetzt werde ich explodieren!« rief sie. »Ich werde die ganze Welt in Brand setzen und dabei einen solchen Lärm machen, daß ein ganzes Jahr lang kein Mensch von was anderem wird sprechen können.«

Und sie explodierte wirklich. »Krach! Krach! Pffft!« machte das Schießpulver. Darüber gab's keinen Zweifel.

Aber niemand hörte sie, nicht einmal die zwei kleinen Jungen, denn die waren fest eingeschlafen.

»Um Gottes willen«, schrie die Gans auf, »es regnet Stöcke!«, und sie schoß ins Wasser.

»Ich wußte doch, ich würde ein riesiges Aufsehen machen«, hauchte die Rakete und ging aus.