de-en  Das Fräulein von Scuderi - 6 von E.T.A. Hoffmann Hard
All the horrors of the time the Martiniere now described in the most vivid colors when the next morning she told her mistress what had happened the previous night and, trembling and shaking, handed her the mysterious box. Both she and Baptiste, who, kneading his nightcap in his hands out of fear and trepidation, stood rather pale in the corner and could hardly speak, asked the mistress most wistfully for the sake of all the saints to open the box but only with the utmost caution. The Scuderi, weighing and scrutinizing the sealed secret in her hand, spoke smilingly: "Both of you are seeing ghosts! – that I am not rich, that no treasures worth murder can be gotten in my case, the wicked assassins out there know this, who, as you yourselves say, detect the innermost parts of these houses probably as well as you and I. My life is supposed to be under threat? With whom can the blame lie for the death of a seventy-three-year-old person who never pursued anyone except the villains and disturbers of the peace in the novels that she herself created, who wrote mediocre verses which can arouse no one's envy, who will leave nothing behind but the state of the old lady who sometimes went to court and a couple dozen well-bound books with gilded edges! And you, Martiniere, may now describe the appearance of the strange man as frighteningly as you want, but I cannot believe that he bore something evil in his mind."
"Thus!" – Martiniere bounced back three steps and Baptiste sank halfway to his knees with a dull "Ach!" when the mistress now pressed on a jutting steal button and the cover of the box sprang open with a noise.
How amazed the mistress was when out of the box a pair of golden bracelets richly studded with jewels and just such a necklace sparkled at her. She took the jewelry out and while she was praising the marvelous handiwork of the necklace, Martiniere eyed the rich bracelets and exclaimed repeatedly that, yes, even the vain Montespan did not possess such jewelry. "But what is this, what does it mean?" said the Scuderi. At that moment she became aware of a small folded note on the bottom of the box. Quite rightly, she hoped to find the explanation of the mystery in it. The note – she had barely read what it contained – slipped out of her trembling hands. She glanced expressively heavenward and then, as if half unconscious, sank back into the armchair. Martiniere jumped terrified. Baptiste hastened to her aid. "Oh," she now shouted in a voice half choking with tears, "Oh, the insult, Oh the deep shame! Must that happen to me at my age! Have I committed an outrage in foolish imprudence, like a young, reckless thing? Oh God, are words thrown down half in jest capable of such a dreadful interpretation? - Is it possible that I, who have remained impeccably faithful to virtue and piety from childhood, could be accused of the crime of being in league with the devil?"
The lady, holding the handkerchief to her eyes, wept and sobbed violently, so that the Martiniere and Baptiste, totally confused and anxious, did not know how to assist their good mistress in her great suffering. The Martiniere had picked up the fateful slip of paper from the ground. On this slip of paper was: Un amant, qui craint les voleurs, n‘est point digne d‘amour. ("A loving man who fears thieves is not worthy of love.)
Your sharp witted spirit, honoured lady, has saved us from great persecution, we who wield the power of the strong over the weak and cowardly and thereby gain treasures for ourselves which are squandered in an unworthy manner. 'As a proof of our gratitude, kindly accept this jewellery. It is the most precious thing we have been able to find for a long time, although you, dear lady, should be decorated with much more beautiful jewellery than this actually is. We ask that you not to withdraw your friendship and gracious remembrance from us.
The Invisibles."
"Is it possible", cried the Scuderi, more or less recovered, "is it possible that one can drive the shameless impertinence, the wicked mockery this far?" - The sun was shining brightly through the window curtains of bright red silk, and as a result the brilliants lying on the table beside the open little box flashed in a reddish glow. Looking at them, the Scuderi veiled her face in horror and ordered the Martiniere to instantly take away the terrifying jewellery with the blood of the murdered adhering to it. Having immediately locked the necklace and bracelets in the little casket, the Martiniere suggested that it would be most advisable to hand over the jewels to the minister of police and confide to him all that had happened in connection with the alarming appearance of the young fellow and delivery of the casket.
The Scuderi stood up and walked in silence slowly up and down the room, as if she was only pondering what to do now. Then she ordered Baptiste to get a carrier chair, and the Martiniere to dress her because she wanted to go to the Marquise de Maintenon immediately.
She let herself be carried to the Marquise just at the hour when, as the Scuderi knew, she was alone in her chambers. She took along the little box with the jewellery in it.
The Marquise was amazed when she saw Mademoiselle, normally full of dignity, and despite her advancing years, loveliness and grace itself, now entering with pale, distorted features and wavering steps. "What for the sake of all the saints has happened to You?" she called out to the poor, frightened lady, who in her frantic state was scarcely able to keep upright and was simply anxious to reach the armchair, which the Marquise pushed towards her. Finally, regaining her ability to speak, the Mademoiselle told, what a deep, unbearable insult had been brought to her, when she had answered the petition of the endangered lovers with that thoughtless joke. The Marquise, having learned every detail, judged that the Scuderi was taking too much to heart that weird event, that the scorn of the wicked vermin never could harm an honorable mind and at last demanded to see the jewellery.
The Scuderi gave her the opened little box and as the Marquise caught sight of the exquisite jewellery, she could not avoid uttering a loud cry of astonishment. Taking out the necklace and bracelets, she went to the window, where she would first let the jewels sparkle in the sun and then hold the delicate gold-work up close to her eyes to properly see with what marvellous art each little hook of the entwined chains had been worked.
Suddenly the Marquise turned quickly to the Lady and shouted: " You probably know, Lady, that these bracelets, this necklace nobody else could have designed than René Cardillac? - In those days René Cardillac was the most skilful gold processor in Paris, one of the most artistic and at the same time oddest people of his day. Rather smaller than tall, but broad-shouldered and of strong, muscular physique, Cardillac, advanced well into the fifties, still had the strength and agility of a young man. This power had to be called unusual, was testified as well by his thick, frizzy, reddish hair of his head and the squat, smooth face. If Cardillac had not been known in all Paris as the most upright honourable man, altruistic, open minded, without any guile, always prepared to help, that very particular look from his small, low set, green flashing eyes, could have put him under suspicion of secret treachery and malice. As already said, Cardillac was the leading artist in his artwork both throughout Paris and maybe of his time at all. Being intimately acquainted with the nature of the gems, he knew how to treat and to set them in such a way, that a jewellery which had been evaluated unremarkable, emerged from Cardillac's studio in glaring splendour. He took every order with consuming desire and made a price, which, so small it was, seemed to bear no relation to the work. Then the work tormented him all the time. Day and night one heard him hammering in his workshop. And often, with the work nearly complete, he suddenly became displeased with the shape and skeptical about the delicateness of some setting of the jewels or of some small snag – reason enough to throw the whole work into the crucible again and begin anew. Thus each work became a pure, second to none masterpiece that astonished the orderer.. But now it was hardly possible to get the completed work from him. Under a thousand pretences he held out on the orderer from week to week, from month to month. In vain he was offered twice as much for the work, he did not want to take a louis more than the agreed price. When he finally had to give in to the customer's urging and hand over the jewellery, he could not suppress all the signs of vexation, even an inner rage that was boiling in him. In case he had to deliver a splendidly rich work, maybe many thousands of value with the preciousness of the jewels, with the exceedingly fine work of gold, he was able to run about as nonsensical, cursing himself, his work and everything around. However, as soon as one ran after him and shouted loud: "René Cardillas, don't you want to make a pretty necklace for my bride - bracelets for my girl" and so on, he suddenly stood still , flashed at that one with his small eyes and asked rubbing his hands: "What have you got then?" That one pulls out a tiny box and speaks: "Here you have the jewels, nothing special at all, common stuff, but in your hands...". Cardillac doesn't wait for him to finish, rips the box out of his hands, takes out the jewels that really are not very worthy, holds them against the light and calls full of delight: "Ho ho - common stuff? - not at all! ... pretty gems ... gorgeous gems, just leave it to me!... and if you don't mind a couple of louis, then I would like to add some small gems which shall make your eyes sparkling just as the dear sun itself..." He answers: "I leave everything to you, Master René, and I pay whatever you ask!" Without distinction, whether he is a wealthy bourgeois or an aristocratic lord of the court, Cardillac throws himself impetuously at him and squeezes and kisses him and exclaims to be quite happy again now, and in eight days the work will be finished. Running home head over heels into his studio, he immediately starts to hammer, and within eight days a masterpiece is accomplished. But, as soon as the one who ordered it would come and pay with joy the required small amount and want to take along the finished jewellery, Cardillac would get morose, coarse, defiant. - "But Master Cardillac, consider, tomorrow will be my wedding." - "Your wedding doesn't mean anything to me, come again and ask for it in a fortnight." - "The jewellery is accomplished, here is the money, I must have it." - "And I tell you that I still have to modify several things of the jewellery and will not give it away today." - "And I tell you, if you don't hand over the jewellery which I am prepared to pay twice on amicable terms, you shall soon see me coming with Argenson's subserving bodyguards." - "Well, so the devil may torture you with a hundred red-hot pincers and hang three hundredweights on the necklace to throttle your bride!" With that, Cardillac tucked the jewelry into the bridegroom's breast pocket, grabbed him by the arm, threw him out the parlor door such that he tumbled down the staircase, and laughed out the window like the devil when he saw how the poor young man, his handkerchief in front of his bloody nose, limped out of the house. – Gar nicht zu erklären war es auch, daß Cardillac oft, wenn er mit Enthusiasmus eine Arbeit übernahm, plötzlich den Besteller mit allen Zeichen des im Innersten aufgeregten Gemüts, mit den erschütterndsten Beteurungen, ja unter Schluchzen und Tränen bei der Jungfrau und allen Heiligen beschwor, ihm das unternommene Werk zu erlassen. Manche der von dem Könige, von dem Volke hochgeachtetsten Personen hatten vergebens große Summen geboten, um nur das kleinste Werk von Cardillac zu erhalten. He prostrated himself to the kings feet and begged for grace not to work for him. Ebenso verweigerte er der Maintenon jede Bestellung, ja, mit dem Ausdruck des Abscheues und Entsetzens verwarf er den Antrag derselben, einen kleinen, mit den Emblemen der Kunst verzierten Ring zu fertigen, den Racine von ihr erhalten sollte.
unit 5
Auf mein Leben soll es abgesehen sein?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 5 days ago
unit 8
"Also!"
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 5 days ago
unit 9
unit 13
"Aber was soll das, was hat das zu bedeuten?"
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 14
sprach die Scuderi.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 16
Mit Recht hoffte sie den Aufschluß des Geheimnisses darin zu finden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 17
Der Zettel, kaum hatte sie, was er enthielt, gelesen, entfiel ihren zitternden Händen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 19
Erschrocken sprang die Martiniere, sprang Baptiste ihr bei.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 21
Muß mir das noch geschehen im hohen Alter!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 22
Hab ich denn im törichten Leichtsinn gefrevelt, wie ein junges, unbesonnenes Ding?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 23
unit 26
Die Martiniere hatte den verhängnisvollen Zettel von der Erde aufgehoben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 27
Auf demselben stand: "Un amant, qui craint les voleurs, n'est point digne d'amour.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 29
Als einen Beweis unserer Dankbarkeit nehmet gütig diesen Schmuck an.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 32
Die Unsichtbaren."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 40
Das Kästchen mit den Juwelen nahm sie mit sich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 42
"Was um aller Heiligen willen ist Euch widerfahren?"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 6 days ago
unit 58
Aber nun war es kaum möglich, die fertige Arbeit von ihm zu erhalten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 59
Unter tausend Vorwänden hielt er den Besteller hin von Woche zu Woche, von Monat zu Monat.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 66
"Ho ho – gemeines Zeug?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 67
– mitnichten!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 68
– hübsche Steine – herrliche Steine, laßt mich nur machen!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 73
– "Aber Meister Cardillac, bedenkt, morgen ist meine Hochzeit."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 74
– "Was schert mich Eure Hochzeit, fragt in vierzehn Tagen wieder nach."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 75
– "Der Schmuck ist fertig, hier liegt das Geld, ich muß ihn haben."
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 82
bf2010 • 4801  commented on  unit 28  1 week, 1 day ago
bf2010 • 4801  commented on  unit 15  1 week, 1 day ago
lollo1a • 3443  commented on  unit 36  1 week, 1 day ago
lollo1a • 3443  commented on  unit 41  1 week, 3 days ago
Merlin57 • 3757  commented on  unit 41  1 week, 3 days ago
bf2010 • 4801  commented on  unit 56  1 week, 3 days ago
bf2010 • 4801  commented on  unit 51  1 week, 4 days ago
lollo1a • 3443  commented on  unit 51  1 week, 4 days ago
lollo1a • 3443  commented on  unit 60  1 week, 5 days ago
lollo1a • 3443  commented on  unit 52  1 week, 5 days ago
lollo1a • 3443  commented on  unit 50  1 week, 5 days ago
Merlin57 • 3757  commented on  unit 5  1 week, 5 days ago
lollo1a • 3443  commented on  unit 25  2 weeks, 2 days ago
Scharing7 • 1774  commented on  unit 25  2 weeks, 2 days ago
lollo1a • 3443  commented on  unit 33  2 weeks, 2 days ago
Merlin57 • 3757  commented on  unit 27  2 weeks, 3 days ago
Scharing7 • 1774  translated  unit 8  2 weeks, 5 days ago
3Bn37Arty • 2768  commented on  unit 1  2 weeks, 5 days ago

Alle die Greuel der Zeit schilderte nun die Martiniere mit den lebhaftesten Farben, als sie am andern Morgen ihrem Fräulein erzählte, was sich in voriger Nacht zugetragen, und übergab ihr zitternd und zagend das geheimnisvolle Kästchen. Sowohl sie als Baptiste, der ganz verblaßt in der Ecke stand und, vor Angst und Beklommenheit die Nachtmütze in den Händen knetend, kaum sprechen konnte, baten das Fräulein auf das wehmütigste um aller Heiligen willen, doch nur mit möglichster Behutsamkeit das Kästchen zu öffnen. Die Scuderi, das verschlossene Geheimnis in der Hand wiegend und prüfend, sprach lächelnd: "Ihr seht beide Gespenster! – Daß ich nicht reich bin, daß bei mir keine Schätze, eines Mordes wert, zu holen sind, das wissen die verruchten Meuchelmörder da draußen, die, wie ihr selbst sagt, das Innerste der Häuser erspähen, wohl ebensogut als ich und ihr. Auf mein Leben soll es abgesehen sein? Wem kann was an dem Tode liegen einer Person von dreiundsiebzig Jahren, die niemals andere verfolgte als die Bösewichter und Friedenstörer in den Romanen, die sie selbst schuf, die mittelmäßige Verse macht, welche niemandes Neid erregen können, die nichts hinterlassen wird, als den Staat des alten Fräuleins, das bisweilen an den Hof ging, und ein paar Dutzend gut eingebundener Bücher mit vergoldetem Schnitt! Und du, Martiniere, du magst nun die Erscheinung des fremden Menschen so schreckhaft beschreiben, wie du willst, doch kann ich nicht glauben, daß er Böses im Sinne getragen."
"Also!" –
Die Martiniere prallte drei Schritte zurück, Baptiste sank mit einem dumpfen Ach! halb in die Knie, als das Fräulein nun an einen hervorragenden stählernen Knopf drückte und der Deckel des Kästchens mit Geräusch aufsprang.
Wie erstaunte das Fräulein, als ihr aus dem Kästchen ein Paar goldne, reich mit Juwelen besetzte Armbänder und eben ein solcher Halsschmuck entgegenfunkelten. Sie nahm das Geschmeide heraus, und indem sie die wundervolle Arbeit des Halsschmucks lobte, beäugelte die Martiniere die reichen Armbänder und rief ein Mal über das andere, daß ja selbst die eitle Montespan nicht solchen Schmuck besitze. "Aber was soll das, was hat das zu bedeuten?" sprach die Scuderi. In dem Augenblick gewahrte sie auf dem Boden des Kästchens einen kleinen zusammengefalteten Zettel. Mit Recht hoffte sie den Aufschluß des Geheimnisses darin zu finden. Der Zettel, kaum hatte sie, was er enthielt, gelesen, entfiel ihren zitternden Händen. Sie warf einen sprechenden Blick zum Himmel und sank dann, wie halb ohnmächtig, in den Lehnsessel zurück. Erschrocken sprang die Martiniere, sprang Baptiste ihr bei. "Oh", rief sie nun mit von Tränen halb erstickter Stimme, "o der Kränkung, o der tiefen Beschämung! Muß mir das noch geschehen im hohen Alter! Hab ich denn im törichten Leichtsinn gefrevelt, wie ein junges, unbesonnenes Ding? – O Gott, sind Worte, halb im Scherz hingeworfen, solcher gräßlichen Deutung fähig! – Darf dann mich, die ich, der Tugend getreu und der Frömmigkeit, tadellos blieb von Kindheit an, darf dann mich das Verbrechen des teuflischen Bündnisses zeihen?"
Das Fräulein hielt das Schnupftuch vor die Augen und weinte und schluchzte heftig, so daß die Martiniere und Baptiste, ganz verwirrt und beklommen, nicht wußten, wie ihrer guten Herrschaft beistehen in ihrem großen Schmerz. Die Martiniere hatte den verhängnisvollen Zettel von der Erde aufgehoben. Auf demselben stand:
"Un amant, qui craint les voleurs,
n'est point digne d'amour.
Euer scharfsinniger Geist, hochgeehrte Dame, hat uns, die wir an der Schwäche und Feigheit das Recht des Stärkern üben und uns Schätze zueignen, die auf unwürdige Weise vergeudet werden sollten, von großer Verfolgung errettet. Als einen Beweis unserer Dankbarkeit nehmet gütig diesen Schmuck an. Es ist das Kostbarste, was wir seit langer Zeit haben auftreiben können, wiewohl Euch, würdige Dame, viel schöneres Geschmeide zieren sollte, als dieses nun eben ist. Wir bitten, daß Ihr uns Eure Freundschaft und Euer huldvolles Andenken nicht entziehen möget.
Die Unsichtbaren."
"Ist es möglich", rief die Scuderi, als sie sich einigermaßen erholt hatte, "ist es möglich, daß man die schamlose Frechheit, den verruchten Hohn so weit treiben kann?" – Die Sonne schien hell durch die Fenstergardinen von hochroter Seide, und so kam es, daß die Brillanten, welche auf dem Tische neben dem offenen Kästchen lagen, in rötlichem Schimmer aufblitzten. Hinblickend, verhüllte die Scuderi voll Entsetzen das Gesicht und befahl der Martiniere, das fürchterliche Geschmeide, an dem das Blut der Ermordeten klebe, augenblicklich fortzuschaffen. Die Martiniere, nachdem sie Halsschmuck und Armbänder sogleich in das Kästchen verschlossen, meinte, daß es wohl am geratensten sein würde, die Juwelen dem Polizeiminister zu übergeben und ihm zu vertrauen, wie sich alles mit der beängstigenden Erscheinung des jungen Menschen und der Einhändigung des Kästchens zugetragen.
Die Scuderi stand auf und schritt schweigend langsam im Zimmer auf und nieder, als sinne sie erst nach, was nun zu tun sei. Dann befahl sie dem Baptiste, einen Tragsessel zu holen, der Martiniere aber, sie anzukleiden, weil sie auf der Stelle hin wolle zur Marquise de Maintenon.
Sie ließ sich hintragen zur Marquise gerade zu der Stunde, wenn diese, wie die Scuderi wußte, sich allein in ihren Gemächern befand. Das Kästchen mit den Juwelen nahm sie mit sich.
Wohl mußte die Marquise sich hoch verwundern, als sie das Fräulein, sonst die Würde, ja trotz ihrer hohen Jahre die Liebenswürdigkeit, die Anmut selbst, eintreten sah, blaß, entstellt, mit wankenden Schritten. "Was um aller Heiligen willen ist Euch widerfahren?" rief sie der armen, beängsteten Dame entgegen, die, ganz außer sich selbst, kaum imstande, sich aufrecht zu erhalten, nur schnell den Lehnsessel zu erreichen suchte, den ihr die Marquise hinschob. Endlich des Wortes wieder mächtig, erzählte das Fräulein, welche tiefe, nicht zu verschmerzende Kränkung ihr jener unbedachtsame Scherz, mit dem sie die Supplik der gefährdeten Liebhaber beantwortet, zugezogen habe. Die Marquise, nachdem sie alles von Moment zu Moment erfahren, urteilte, daß die Scuderi sich das sonderbare Ereignis viel zu sehr zu Herzen nehme, daß der Hohn verruchten Gesindels nie ein frommes, edles Gemüt treffen könne, und verlangte zuletzt den Schmuck zu sehen.
Die Scuderi gab ihr das geöffnete Kästchen, und die Marquise konnte sich, als sie das köstliche Geschmeide erblickte, des lauten Ausrufs der Verwunderung nicht erwehren. Sie nahm den Halsschmuck, die Armbänder heraus und trat damit an das Fenster, wo sie bald die Juwelen an der Sonne spielen ließ, bald die zierliche Goldarbeit ganz nahe vor die Augen hielt, um nur recht zu erschauen, mit welcher wundervollen Kunst jedes kleine Häkchen der verschlungenen Ketten gearbeitet war.
Auf einmal wandte sich die Marquise rasch um nach dem Fräulein und rief: "Wißt Ihr wohl, Fräulein, daß diese Armbänder, diesen Halsschmuck niemand anders gearbeitet haben kann, als René Cardillac?" – René Cardillac war damals der geschickteste Goldarbeiter in Paris, einer der kunstreichsten und zugleich sonderbarsten Menschen seiner Zeit. Eher klein als groß, aber breitschultrig und von starkem, muskulösem Körperbau, hatte Cardillac, hoch in die funfziger Jahre vorgerückt, noch die Kraft, die Beweglichkeit des Jünglings. Von dieser Kraft, die ungewöhnlich zu nennen, zeugte auch das dicke, krause, rötliche Haupthaar und das gedrungene, gleitende Antlitz. Wäre Cardillac nicht in ganz Paris als der rechtlichste Ehrenmann, uneigennützig, offen, ohne Hinterhalt, stets zu helfen bereit, bekannt gewesen, sein ganz besonderer Blick aus kleinen, tiefliegenden, grün funkelnden Augen hätten ihn in den Verdacht heimlicher Tücke und Bosheit bringen können. Wie gesagt, Cardillac war in seiner Kunst der Geschickteste nicht sowohl in Paris, als vielleicht überhaupt seiner Zeit. Innig vertraut mit der Natur der Edelsteine, wußte er sie auf eine Art zu behandeln und zu fassen, daß der Schmuck, der erst für unscheinbar gegolten, aus Cardillacs Werkstatt hervorging in glänzender Pracht. Jeden Auftrag übernahm er mit brennender Begierde und machte einen Preis, der, so geringe war er, mit der Arbeit in keinem Verhältnis zu stehen schien. Dann ließ ihm das Werk keine Ruhe, Tag und Nacht hörte man ihn in seiner Werkstatt hämmern, und oft, war die Arbeit beinahe vollendet, mißfiel ihm plötzlich die Form, er zweifelte an der Zierlichkeit irgendeiner Fassung der Juwelen, irgendeines kleinen Häkchens – Anlaß genug, die ganze Arbeit wieder in den Schmelztiegel zu werfen und von neuem anzufangen. So wurde jede Arbeit ein reines, unübertreffliches Meisterwerk, das den Besteller in Erstaunen setzte. Aber nun war es kaum möglich, die fertige Arbeit von ihm zu erhalten. Unter tausend Vorwänden hielt er den Besteller hin von Woche zu Woche, von Monat zu Monat. Vergebens bot man ihm das Doppelte für die Arbeit, nicht einen Louis mehr als den bedungenen Preis wollte er nehmen. Mußte er dann endlich dem Andringen des Bestellers weichen und den Schmuck herausgeben, so konnte er sich aller Zeichen des tiefsten Verdrusses, ja einer innern Wut, die in ihm kochte, nicht erwehren. Hatte er ein bedeutenderes, vorzüglich reiches Werk, vielleicht viele Tausende an Wert, bei der Kostbarkeit der Juwelen, bei der überzierlichen Goldarbeit, abliefern müssen, so war er imstande, wie unsinnig umherzulaufen, sich, seine Arbeit, alles um sich her verwünschend. Aber sowie einer hinter ihm herrannte und laut schrie: "René Cardillac, möchtet Ihr nicht einen schönen Halsschmuck machen für meine Braut – Armbänder für mein Mädchen usw.", dann stand er plötzlich still, blitzte den an mit seinen kleinen Augen und fragte, die Hände reibend: "Was habt Ihr denn?" Der zieht nun ein Schächtelchen hervor und spricht: "Hier sind Juwelen, viel Sonderliches ist es nicht, gemeines Zeug, doch unter Euern Händen –" Cardillac läßt ihn nicht ausreden, reißt ihm das Schächtelchen aus den Händen, nimmt die Juwelen heraus, die wirklich nicht viel wert sind, hält sie gegen das Licht und ruft voll Entzücken. "Ho ho – gemeines Zeug? – mitnichten! – hübsche Steine – herrliche Steine, laßt mich nur machen! – und wenn es Euch auf eine Handvoll Louis nicht ankommt, so will ich noch ein paar Steinchen hineinbringen, die Euch in die Augen funkeln sollen wie die liebe Sonne selbst –" Der spricht: "Ich überlasse Euch alles, Meister René, und zahle, was Ihr wollt!" Ohne Unterschied, mag er nun ein reicher Bürgersmann oder ein vornehmer Herr vom Hofe sein, wirft sich Cardillac ungestüm an seinen – Hals und drückt und küßt ihn und spricht, nun sei er wieder ganz glücklich, und in acht Tagen werde die Arbeit fertig sein. Er rennt über Hals und Kopf nach Hause, hinein in die Werkstatt und hämmert darauf los, und in acht Tagen ist ein Meisterwerk zustande gebracht. Aber sowie der, der es bestellte, kommt, mit Freuden die geforderte geringe Summe bezahlen und den fertigen Schmuck mitnehmen will, wird Cardillac verdrießlich, grob, trotzig. – "Aber Meister Cardillac, bedenkt, morgen ist meine Hochzeit." – "Was schert mich Eure Hochzeit, fragt in vierzehn Tagen wieder nach." – "Der Schmuck ist fertig, hier liegt das Geld, ich muß ihn haben." – "Und ich sage Euch, daß ich noch manches an dem Schmuck ändern muß und ihn heute nicht herausgeben werde." – "Und ich sage Euch, daß wenn Ihr mir den Schmuck, den ich Euch allenfalls doppelt bezahlen will, nicht herausgabt im guten, Ihr mich gleich mit Argensons dienstbaren Trabanten anrücken sehen sollt." – "Nun so quäle Euch der Satan mit hundert glühenden Kneipzangen und hänge drei Zentner an den Halsschmuck, damit er Eure Braut erdroßle!" – Und damit steckt Cardillac dem Bräutigam den Schmuck in die Busentasche, ergreift ihn beim Arm, wirft ihn zur Stubentür hinaus, daß er die ganze Treppe hinabpoltert, und lacht wie der Teufel zum Fenster hinaus, wenn er sieht, wie der arme junge Mensch, das Schnupftuch vor der blutigen Nase, aus dem Hause hinaushinkt. – Gar nicht zu erklären war es auch, daß Cardillac oft, wenn er mit Enthusiasmus eine Arbeit übernahm, plötzlich den Besteller mit allen Zeichen des im Innersten aufgeregten Gemüts, mit den erschütterndsten Beteurungen, ja unter Schluchzen und Tränen bei der Jungfrau und allen Heiligen beschwor, ihm das unternommene Werk zu erlassen. Manche der von dem Könige, von dem Volke hochgeachtetsten Personen hatten vergebens große Summen geboten, um nur das kleinste Werk von Cardillac zu erhalten. Er warf sich dem Könige zu Füßen und flehte uni die Huld, nichts für ihn arbeiten zu dürfen. Ebenso verweigerte er der Maintenon jede Bestellung, ja, mit dem Ausdruck des Abscheues und Entsetzens verwarf er den Antrag derselben, einen kleinen, mit den Emblemen der Kunst verzierten Ring zu fertigen, den Racine von ihr erhalten sollte.