de-en  Das Fräulein von Scuderi - 5 von E.T.A. Hoffmann
One morning Desgrais comes to President la Regnie, his pale face distored with rage. - "What do you have, what news? - Did you find the evidence?" the president calls out to him. "Ha - Sire," Desgrais begins, stuttering in anger, "ha Sire - yesterday, in the evening - not far from the Louvre, the Marquis de la Fare was attacked in my presence." "Heaven and earth", la Regnie is cheering with joy - "we have them! "Oh, just listen," Desgrais joint in with a bitter smile, "oh, just hear how it has taken place. - So at the Louvre I stand and pass, all hell in my chest, on the devils who mock me. There, with uncertain steps, always looking behind himself, a figure passes by close to me without seeing me. In the glow of the moon I recognize the Marquis de la Fare. I could expect him there. I knew where he creeps around. He is barely ten – twelve steps passed me when a figure jumps up as if out of the ground, knocks him down and attacks him. Impulsively, surprised by the moment that could deliver the murderer into my hands, I shouted loudly and want to attack him with a mighty jump from my hiding place; then I become entangled in my cloak and fall down. I see the man hurry away as if on the wings of the wind. I pick myself up and run after him. While running I blow my horn – from a distance the whistles of the guards answer – it turns lively – the clanging of weapons, the clatter of horses from every side. - "Here - here - Desgrais - Desgrais!" I scream, that it resounds through the streets. I constantly see the man ahead of me in the moonlight, as he, to trick me, turns there and there. We come into Nicaise Street, there his energy seems to decline. I double mine – he still has a lead of fifteen steps at most –." "You overtake him, – you grab him, the guards arrive," la Regnie shouts with flashing eyes as he grasps Desgrais by the arm as if he is the fleeing murderer. – "Fifteen steps," Desgrais continues with a dull voice and labored breathing. "Fifteen steps ahead of me the man jumps into the shadow on the side and disappears through the wall." "Disappears? Through the wall! Are you mad?" la Regnie shouts while he takes two steps back and claps his hands. "Call me," Desgrais continues , rubbing his forehead like as one who is troubled by evil thoughts, "call me, Sire, at least a madman, a foolish visionary, but it is not different from how I tell you. I stood numbly in front of the wall, when several henchmen came along breathlessly; with them the Marquis de la Fare, who pulled himself together, the bare sword in his hand. We light the torches, we grope back and forth along the wall; no sign of a door, a window, an opening. It is a thick stony courtyard wall which leans against a house in which people live against whom even the slightest suspicion does not arise. Even today I have taken a closer look to everything. - It's the devil himself, who is teasing us." Desgrais' story became known in Paris. Their heads were filled with sorceries, exorcisms, the devil's leagues of Voisin, of Vigoureux, of the notorious priest le Sage; and as it now lies in our eternal nature, that the inclination to the supernatural, to the miraculous, surpasses all reason, so one soon believed nothing less than that, as Desgrais said only in anger, the devil himself really did protect the wicked ones who had sold him their souls. One can imagine that Desgrais' story was embellished with various details. The story of it, including a woodcut, depicting a terrible hellish figure which sinks into the ground before the frightened Desgrais, was printed and sold at all corners. Enough to intimidate the people and to take all the courage away from the bailiffs, who now wandered through the streets at nighttime with fear and trembling, festooned with amulets and drenched in holy water.
Argenson saw that the efforts of the Chamber ardente were failing and approached the king to appoint a court for the new crime that would track down the perpetrators and punish them. The King, convinced of having given the Chambre ardente too much power already, shaken by the atrocities of numerous executions instigated by the bloodthirsty la Regnie, dismissed the suggestion completely.
Another means was chosen to get the King's interest in the matter.
In the rooms of the Maintenon, where the king used to stay on afternoons and likely also worked with his ministers until late at nights, a poem was presented to him in the name of his vulnerable lovers, who complained that, if gallantry demanded them to bring an rich present to their lovers, they would always have to risk their lives. It would be glory and desire, to squirt one's blood for the beloved in the knightly fight; but otherwise it would be with the insidious attack of the murderer, against which one could not arm himself. Louis, the shining polar star of all love and gallantry, is asked to shining brightly, disperse the darkest night, and thus unveil the deep secret hidden in it. The divine hero who crushed his enemies, like Hercules the Lernaean Serpent, likeTheseus the Minotaurus, will now also draw his victoriously glittering sword, and fight the threatening monster that draws off all love lust and darkens all joy into deep suffering and bleak sorrow.
As severe as the matter was, the poem was not lacking of witty ingenious expressions, exquisite in the narrative of how the lovers would have to be afraid on their secret sneaking paths to the beloved, how the fear would already have killed in the budding all love lust and every beautiful adventure of gallantry. When it came to the conclusion that everything ended in a lofty Panegyric on Louis XIV, it could not be denied that the King read the poem with obvious pleasure. Having accomplished with it, he quickly turned to the Maintenon, never turning his eyes off the paper, read the poem again with a loud voice and then asked, gracefully smiling, what she thought of the wishes of the endangered lovers. The Maintenon, steadfast to her earnest mind and always in the color of a certain piety, replied that secret, forbidden paths were worthy of no special protection, but that the terrible criminals were worthy of special measures for their extermination. The king, not satisfied with this wavering reply, collapsed the paper and wanted to go back to the secretary of state, who was working in the other room, when, with a glance he threw sideways, he noticed the Scuderi who was present and who had taken a seat on a small armchair not far from the Maintenon. Toward her he went now; the dainty smile, which first played around mouth and cheeks, that had vanished, regained the upper hand and standing close to the lady and unfolding the poem again, he spoke softly: "The Marquise does not want to know anything about the gallantries of our loving men and dodges me on ways that are nothing less than forbidden. But you, Mademoiselle, what do you think of this poetic petition?" - Mademoiselle de Scuderie reverently got up from her fauteuil, a brief red like evening purple rushed over the pale cheeks of the worthy old lady; bowing softly with downcast eyes she spoke: "Un amant, qui craint les voleurs, n'est point digne d'amour." ("A lover, who fears thieves, is not worthy of love.")
The king, quite astonished by the knightly spirit of these few words, which smashed down to the ground the whole poem with its lengthy tirades, shouted with flashing eyes: "By the holy Dionysius, you are right, Mylady! No blind measure that could meet the innocent as good as the guilty one, should be protected by recreancy; may Argenson and La Regnie do theirs!" -
unit 1
Eines Morgens kommt Desgrais zu dem Präsidenten la Regnie, blaß, entstellt, außer sich.
6 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 2
– "Was habt Ihr, was für Nachrichten?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 5 days ago
unit 3
– Fandet Ihr die Spur?"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 4
ruft ihm der Präsident entgegen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 6
"Himmel und Erde", jauchzt la Regnie auf vor Freude – "wir haben sie!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 10
Im Mondesschimmer erkenne ich den Marquis de la Fare.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 11
Ich konnt' ihn da erwarten, ich wußte, wo er hinschlich.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 15
– 'Hierher – hierher – Desgrais – Desgrais!'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 16
schreie ich, daß es durch die Straßen hallt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 19
"Verschwindet?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 20
– durch die Mauer!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 21
– Seid Ihr rasend?"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 22
ruft la Regnie, indem er zwei Schritte zurücktritt und die Hände zusammenschlägt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 27
Noch heute habe ich alles in genauen Augenschein genommen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 28
– Der Teufel selbst ist es, der uns foppt."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 29
Desgrais' Geschichte wurde in Paris bekannt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 31
Man kann es sich denken, daß Desgrais' Geschichte mancherlei tollen Schmuck erhielt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 36
Man wählte ein anderes Mittel, den König für die Sache zu beleben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 42
unit 43
unit 48
Aber Ihr, mein Fräulein, was haltet Ihr von dieser dichterischen Supplik?"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 52

1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 1  2 weeks, 1 day ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 1  2 weeks, 1 day ago
Scharing7 • 1774  translated  unit 52  3 weeks, 1 day ago
"-"
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 19  3 weeks, 2 days ago

Eines Morgens kommt Desgrais zu dem Präsidenten la Regnie, blaß, entstellt, außer sich. – "Was habt Ihr, was für Nachrichten? – Fandet Ihr die Spur?" ruft ihm der Präsident entgegen. "Ha – gnädiger Herr", fängt Desgrais an, vor Wut stammelnd, "ha, gnädiger Herr – gestern in der Nacht – unfern des Louvre ist der Marquis de la Fare angefallen worden in meiner Gegenwart." "Himmel und Erde", jauchzt la Regnie auf vor Freude – "wir haben sie! –" "O hört nur", fällt Desgrais mit bitterm Lächeln ein, "o hört nur erst, wie sich alles begeben. – Am Louvre steh ich also und passe, die ganze Hölle in der Brust, auf die Teufel, die meiner spotten. Da kommt mit unsicheren Schritt, immer hinter sich schauend, eine Gestalt dicht bei mir vorüber, ohne mich zu sehen. Im Mondesschimmer erkenne ich den Marquis de la Fare. Ich konnt' ihn da erwarten, ich wußte, wo er hinschlich. Kaum ist er zehn – zwölf Schritte bei mir vorüber, da springt wie aus der Erde herauf eine Figur, schmettert ihn nieder und fällt über ihn her. Unbesonnen, überrascht von dem Augenblick, der den Mörder in meine Hand liefern konnte, schrie ich laut auf und will mit einem gewaltigen Sprunge aus meinem Schlupfwinkel heraus auf ihn zusetzen; da verwickle ich mich in den Mantel und falle hin. Ich sehe den Menschen wie auf den Flügeln des Windes forteilen, ich rapple mich auf, ich renne ihm nach – laufend stoße ich in mein Horn – aus der Ferne antworten die Pfeifen der Häscher – es wird lebendig – Waffengeklirr, Pferdegetrappel von allen Seiten. – 'Hierher – hierher – Desgrais – Desgrais!' schreie ich, daß es durch die Straßen hallt. – Immer sehe ich den Menschen vor mir im hellen Mondschein, wie er, mich zu täuschen, da – dort – einbiegt; wir kommen in die Straße Nicaise, da scheinen seine Kräfte zu sinken, ich strenge die meinigen doppelt an – noch funfzehn Schritte höchstens hat er Vorsprung –" "Ihr holt ihn ein – Ihr packt ihn, die Häscher kommen", ruft la Regnie mit blitzenden Augen, indem er Desgrais beim Arm ergreift, als sei der der fliehende Mörder selbst. – "Funfzehn Schritte", fährt Desgrais mit dumpfer Stimme und mühsam atmend fort, "funfzehn Schritte vor mir springt der Mensch auf die Seite in den Schatten und verschwindet durch die Mauer." "Verschwindet? – durch die Mauer! – Seid Ihr rasend?" ruft la Regnie, indem er zwei Schritte zurücktritt und die Hände zusammenschlägt. "Nennt mich", fährt Desgrais fort, sich die Stirne reibend wie einer, den böse Gedanken plagen, "nennt mich, gnädiger Herr, immerhin einen Rasenden, einen törichten Geisterseher, aber es ist nicht anders, als wie ich es Euch erzähle. Erstarrt stehe ich vor der Mauer, als mehrere Häscher atemlos herbeikommen; mit ihnen der Marquis de la Fare, der sich aufgerafft, den bloßen Degen in der Hand. Wir zünden die Fackeln an, wir tappen an der Mauer hin und her; keine Spur einer Türe, eines Fensters, einer Öffnung. Es ist eine starke steinerne Hofmauer, die sich an ein Haus lehnt, in dem Leute wohnen, gegen die auch nicht der leiseste Verdacht aufkommt. Noch heute habe ich alles in genauen Augenschein genommen. – Der Teufel selbst ist es, der uns foppt." Desgrais' Geschichte wurde in Paris bekannt. Die Köpfe waren erfüllt von den Zaubereien, Geisterbeschwörungen, Teufelsbündnissen der Voisin, des Vigoureux, des berüchtigten Priesters le Sage; und wie es denn nun in unserer ewigen Natur liegt, daß der Hang zum Übernatürlichen, zum Wunderbaren alle Vernunft überbietet, so glaubte man bald nichts Geringeres, als daß, wie Desgrais nur im Unmut gesagt, wirklich der Teufel selbst die Verruchten schütze, die ihm ihre Seelen verkauft. Man kann es sich denken, daß Desgrais' Geschichte mancherlei tollen Schmuck erhielt. Die Erzählung davon mit einem Holzschnitt darüber, eine gräßliche Teufelsgestalt vorstellend, die vor dem erschrockenen Desgrais in die Erde versinkt, wurde gedruckt und an allen Ecken verkauft. Genug, das Volk einzuschüchtern und selbst den Häschern allen Mut zu nehmen, die nun zur Nachtzeit mit Zittern und Zagen die Straßen durchirrten, mit Amuletten behängt und eingeweicht in Weihwasser.
Argenson sah die Bemühungen der Chambre ardente scheitern und ging den König an, für das neue Verbrechen einen Gerichtshof zu ernennen, der mit noch ausgedehnterer Macht den Tätern nachspüre und sie strafe. Der König, überzeugt, schon der Chambre ardente zuviel Gewalt gegeben zu haben, erschüttert von dem Greuel unzähliger Hinrichtungen, die der blutgierige la Regnie veranlaßt, wies den Vorschlag gänzlich von der Hand.
Man wählte ein anderes Mittel, den König für die Sache zu beleben.
In den Zimmern der Maintenon, wo sich der König nachmittags aufzuhalten und wohl auch mit seinen Ministern bis in die späte Nacht hinein zu arbeiten pflegte, wurde ihm ein Gedicht überreicht im Namen der gefährdeten Liebhaber, welche klagten, daß, gebiete ihnen die Galanterie, der Geliebten ein reiches Geschenk zu bringen, sie allemal ihr Leben daransetzen müßten. Ehre und Lust sei es, im ritterlichen Kampf sein Blut für die Geliebte zu verspritzen; anders verhalte es sich aber mit dem heimtückischen Anfall des Mörders, wider den man sich nicht wappnen könne. Ludwig, der leuchtende Polarstern aller Liebe und Galanterie, der möge hellaufstrahlend die finstre Nacht zerstreuen und so das schwarze Geheimnis, das darin verborgen, enthüllen. Der göttliche Held, der seine Feinde niedergeschmettert, werde nun auch sein siegreich funkelndes Schwert zücken und, wie Herkules die Lernäische Schlange, wie Theseus den Minotaur, das bedrohliche Ungeheuer bekämpfen, das alle Liebeslust wegzehre und alle Freude verdüstre in tiefes Leid, in trostlose Trauer.
So ernst die Sache auch war, so fehlte es diesem Gedicht doch nicht, vorzüglich in der Schilderung, wie die Liebhaber auf dem heimlichen Schleichwege zur Geliebten sich ängstigen müßten, wie die Angst schon alle Liebeslust, jedes schöne Abenteuer der Galanterie im Aufkeimen töte, an geistreich-witzigen Wendungen. Kam nun noch hinzu, daß beim Schluß alles in einen hochtrabenden Panegyrikus auf Ludwig den XIV. ausging, so konnte es nicht fehlen, daß der König das Gedicht mit sichtlichem Wohlgefallen durchlas. Damit zustande gekommen, drehte er sich, die Augen nicht wegwendend von dem Papier, rasch um zur Maintenon, las das Gedicht noch einmal mit lauter Stimme ab und fragte dann, anmutig lächelnd, was sie von den Wünschen der gefährdeten Liebhaber halte. Die Maintenon, ihrem ernsten Sinne treu und immer in der Farbe einer gewissen Frömmigkeit, erwiderte, daß geheime, verbotene Wege eben keines besondern Schutzes würdig, die entsetzlichen Verbrecher aber wohl besonderer Maßregeln zu ihrer Vertilgung wert wären. Der König, mit dieser schwankenden Antwort unzufrieden, schlug das Papier zusammen und wollte zurück zu dem Staatssekretär, der in dem andern Zimmer arbeitete, als ihm bei einem Blick, den er seitwärts warf, die Scuderi ins Auge fiel, die zugegen war und eben unfern der Maintenon auf einem kleinen Lehnsessel Platz genommen hatte. Auf diese schritt er nun los; das anmutige Lächeln, das erst um Mund und Wangen spielte und das verschwunden, gewann wieder Oberhand, und dicht vor dem Fräulein stehend und das Gedicht wieder auseinanderfaltend, sprach er sanft: "Die Marquise mag nun einmal von den Galanterien unserer verliebten Herren nichts wissen und weicht mir aus auf Wegen, die nichts weniger als verboten sind. Aber Ihr, mein Fräulein, was haltet Ihr von dieser dichterischen Supplik?" – Die Scuderi stand ehrerbietig auf von ihrem Lehnsessel, ein flüchtiges Rot überflog wie Abendpurpur die blassen Wangen der alten würdigen Dame, sie sprach, sich leise verneigend, mit niedergeschlagenen Augen:
"Un amant, qui craint les voleurs,
n'est point digne d'amour."
Der König, ganz erstaunt über den ritterlichen Geist dieser wenigen Worte, die das ganze Gedicht mit seinen ellenlangen Tiraden zu Boden schlugen, rief mit blitzenden Augen: "Beim heiligen Dionys, Ihr habt recht, Fräulein! Keine blinde Maßregel, die den Unschuldigen trifft mit dem Schuldigen, soll die Feigheit schützen; mögen Argenson und la Regnie das Ihrige tun!" –