de-en  Oscar Wilde: Märchen - Der selbstsüchtige Riese
The Selfish Giant

Every afternoon, when they came out of school, the children used to go to the giant's garden and play.

It was a big, lovely garden with soft, green grass. Here and there were beautiful flowers standing like stars over the grass, and there were twelve peach trees that had tender, rosy and pearly flowers in spring and bore abundant fruit in autumn. The birds sat on the branches and sang so sweetly that the children interrupted their games to listen to them. "How happy we are here!" they shouted to each other.

One day the giant came back. He had visited his friend Ogre in Cornwall and had been with him for seven years When the seven years were over, he had said everything he knew, for his conversation ability was limited, and he decided to return to his own castle. When he arrived, he saw the children playing in the garden.

"What are you doing here?" he shouted in a very harsh voice, and the children ran away.

"My own garden is my own garden," said the giant; "everyone can understand that, and I won't allow anyone to play in it but me. Therefore, he built a high wall around it and attached a plaque to it: Entry forbidden under penalty.

He was a very selfish giant.

The poor children now had no place to play. They tried to play in the street, but the street was very dusty and full of hard stones, and they disliked that. They used to walk around the high wall when their lessons were over and talk about the beautiful garden behind it. "How happy we were there," they said to each other.

Then spring came, and all over the countryside there were little flowers and little birds. Only in the garden of the selfish giant was it still winter. The birds would not sing in it, because there were no children there, and the trees forgot to bloom. Once a beautiful flower stuck its head out of the grass, but when it saw the plaque, it felt so sorry for the children that it slipped down again into the ground and went to sleep. The only beings who enjoyed it were snow and frost. "Spring has forgotten this garden," they said, "so we want to stay here all year round." Snow covered the grass with its thick white coat, and frost painted all the trees with silver. Then they invited the north wind to visit, and it came. He was wrapped in fur and roared around the garden all day long and blew down the chimneys on the roof. "This is a delightful place," he said; "we must ask the hail to come here." So the hail came. He rattled the roof of the castle for three hours every day until he had broken almost all the roof tiles, and then he kept running in circles through the garden as fast as he could. He was dressed in grey, and his breath was like ice.

"I don't understand why spring has failed to appear for so long," said the selfish giant as he sat at the window looking out at his cold, white garden; "hopefully there will be a change of weather." But spring didn't come at all, and neither did summer. Autumn brought golden fruit into every garden, only in the giant's garden it gave none. ... "He is too selfish," he said. So it was always winter there, and the north wind and the hail and the frost and the snow danced among the trees.

One morning the giant lay awake in bed, when he heard some lovely music. It sounded so sweet to his ears that he thought it must be the king's musicians passing by. In reality it was only a small linnet singing outside his window, but he hadn't heard any birds singing in his garden for so long that it seemed to him to be the most beautiful music in the world. Then the hail stopped dancing over his head, the north wind stopped roaring, and a delightful scent came to him through the open window sash. "I believe the spring has come at last," said the giant; and he jumped out of bed and looked out.

What did he see?

He saw a most wonderful picture. Through a small hole in the wall children had crawled in and were sitting in the branches of the trees. In every tree that he could see there was a little child. And the trees were so elated to have the children back that they had covered themselves with blossoms and tenderly put their arms around the heads of the children. The birds were flying around and twittering with delight, and the flowers were peeking out of the green grass and laughing. It was a lovely sight, only in one corner it was still winter. It was the furthest corner of the garden, and in it stood a little boy. He was so tiny that he could not reach up to the branches of the tree, and he kept wandering around it weeping bitterly. The poor tree was still quite covered with frost and snow, and the north wind was blowing and roaring over it. "Climb up! little boy," said the tree and bent its branches down as far as it could; but the boy was too tiny.

And the giant's heart melted as he looked out. "How selfish I've been," he said; "now I know why the spring didn't want to come here. I will put the poor little boy on top of the tree, and then I will knock down the wall, and my garden will always be the playground for the children." He was really sorry for what he had done.

He went down, very gently opened the front door and went out into the garden. But when the children saw him, they were so frightened that they all ran away, and it became winter again in the garden. Only the little boy did not run away, for his eyes were so full of tears that he did not see the giant coming. And the giant stole up behind him and took him gently in his hand, and put him up into the tree. And the tree immediately burst into blossom, and the birds lighted upon it and sang, and the little boy stretched out both his arms and wrapped them around the giant's neck and kissed him. And when the other children saw that the giant was no longer evil, they came running back, and with them came the spring. "Now It's your garden, little children," said the giant, and he took a big ax and knocked the wall down. And when the people went to the market at twelve o'clock, they found the giant playing with the children in the most beautiful garden they had ever seen. All day long they played, and in the evening they came to the giant to bid him good-bye.

"But where's your little companion?" he asked, "the boy I put in the tree." The giant loved him the most because he had kissed him.

"We don't know," the children replied, "he's gone away." "You must surely tell him that he is welcome here again tomorrow," said the giant. But the children explained they didn't know where he lived and had never seen him before; and the giant felt very saddened.

Every afternoon, when the school was over, the children came and played with the giant. But the little boy whom the giant loved was never seen again. The giant was very kind-hearted to all the children, but he missed his first little friend and often spoke of him. "How much I'd like to see him!" he used to day.

Years went by, and the giant grew very old and feeble. He couldn't play outside anymore, so he sat in a tall easychair and watched the children at their games and admired his garden. "I have many beautiful flowers", he said,"but the children are the most beautiful flowers of all." One winter morning he looked out of his window, as he was dressing. He didn't hate the winter any longer, for he knew, that the winter was merely asleep, and that the flowers were resting.

Suddenly he rubbed his eyes in wonder and looked out breathlessly. It certainly was a marvelous sight. In the farthest corner of the garden was a tree quite covered with lovely white blossoms. Its branches were entirely golden and its silver fruits hung down from them and beneath stood the little boy, whom he loved.

In great joy the giant ran down the stairs and out into the garden. He hurried over the grass and approached the child. When he was close to him, his face turned red with anger and he asked, "Who has dared to wound you?" For from the palms of the child's hands were two nail marks, and two nail marks were on his little feet.

"Who has dared to wound you?" cried the giant; "tell me so that I may take my great sword and slay him." "No!" the child answered; "for these are wounds of love." "Who are you?" asked the giant, and a strange reverence befell him, and he knelt before the little child.

And the child smiled at the giant and said to him, "Once you let me play in your garden; today you shall come with me into my garden, which is paradise. And when the children ran in that afternoon, they found the giant lying dead under the tree, all covered with white flowers.
unit 1
Der selbstsüchtige Riese.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 3
Es war ein großer, lieblicher Garten mit weichem, grünem Gras.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 6
»Wie glücklich sind wir hier!« riefen sie einander zu.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 7
Eines Tages kam der Riese zurück.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 8
unit 10
Als er ankam, sah er die Kinder in dem Garten spielen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 13
Er war ein sehr selbstsüchtiger Riese.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 14
Die armen Kinder hatten nun keinen Platz, wo sie spielen konnten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 17
»Wie glücklich waren wir dort,« sagten sie zueinander.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 18
Dann kam der Frühling, und überall im Land waren kleine Blumen und kleine Vögel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 19
Nur im Garten des selbstsüchtigen Riesen war es noch Winter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 22
Die einzigen Wesen, die daran ihre Freude hatten, waren Schnee und Frost.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 24
Dann luden sie den Nordwind zum Besuch ein, und er kam.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 28
Er war in Grau gekleidet, und sein Atem war wie Eis.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 31
»Er ist zu selbstsüchtig,« sagte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 33
Eines Morgens lag der Riese wach im Bett, da hörte er eine liebliche Musik.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 34
unit 38
Was sah er?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 39
Er sah das wundervollste Bild.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 41
Auf jedem Baum, den er sehen konnte, war ein kleines Kind.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 44
Es war ein lieblicher Anblick, nur in einer Ecke war noch Winter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 45
Es war die äußerste Ecke des Gartens, und in ihr stand ein kleiner Knabe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 48
»Klett're hinauf!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 50
Und des Riesen Herz schmolz, als er hinausblickte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 53
Er stieg hinab, öffnete ganz sanft die Vordertüre und ging hinaus in den Garten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 66
Aber der kleine Knabe, den der Riese liebte, wurde nie wieder gesehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 68
»Wie gerne möchte ich ihn sehen!« pflegte er zu sagen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 69
Jahre vergingen, und der Riese wurde sehr alt und schwach.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 73
Plötzlich rieb er sich die Augen vor Staunen und schaute atemlos hinaus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 74
Es war wirklich ein wunderbarer Anblick.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 77
In großer Freude rannte der Riese die Treppe hinab und hinaus in den Garten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 78
Er eilte über das Gras und näherte sich dem Kinde.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago

Der selbstsüchtige Riese.

Jeden Nachmittag, wenn sie aus der Schule kamen, pflegten die Kinder in des Riesen Garten zu gehen und dort zu spielen.

Es war ein großer, lieblicher Garten mit weichem, grünem Gras. Hier und da standen über dem Gras schöne Blumen wie Sterne, und es waren dort zwölf Pfirsichbäume, die im Frühling zarte, rosige und perlfarbene Blüten hatten und im Herbst reiche Früchte trugen. Die Vögel saßen auf den Zweigen und sangen so süß, daß die Kinder ihre Spiele unterbrachen, um ihnen zu lauschen. »Wie glücklich sind wir hier!« riefen sie einander zu.

Eines Tages kam der Riese zurück. Er hatte seinen Freund Oger in Cornwall besucht und war sieben Jahre bei ihm gewesen. Als die sieben Jahre vorbei waren, hatte er alles gesagt, was er wußte, denn seine Unterhaltungsgabe war begrenzt, und er beschloß, in seine eigene Burg zurückzukehren. Als er ankam, sah er die Kinder in dem Garten spielen.

»Was macht ihr hier?« schrie er mit sehr barscher Stimme, und die Kinder rannten davon.

»Mein eigener Garten ist mein eigener Garten,« sagte der Riese; »das kann jeder verstehen, und ich erlaube niemand, darin zu spielen als mir selbst.« Deshalb baute er ringsherum eine hohe Mauer und befestigte eine Tafel daran:

Eintritt bei Strafe verboten.

Er war ein sehr selbstsüchtiger Riese.

Die armen Kinder hatten nun keinen Platz, wo sie spielen konnten. Sie versuchten auf der Straße zu spielen, aber die Straße war sehr staubig und voll von harten Steinen, und das liebten sie nicht. Sie pflegten rund um die hohe Mauer zu gehen, wenn ihr Unterricht vorbei war, und von dem schönen Garten dahinter zu reden. »Wie glücklich waren wir dort,« sagten sie zueinander.

Dann kam der Frühling, und überall im Land waren kleine Blumen und kleine Vögel. Nur im Garten des selbstsüchtigen Riesen war es noch Winter. Die Vögel wollten darin nicht singen, weil dort keine Kinder waren, und die Bäume vergaßen zu blühen. Einmal steckte eine schöne Blume ihren Kopf aus dem Gras hervor, aber als sie die Tafel sah, taten ihr die Kinder so leid, daß sie wieder in den Boden hinabglitt und sich schlafen legte. Die einzigen Wesen, die daran ihre Freude hatten, waren Schnee und Frost. »Der Frühling hat diesen Garten vergessen,« sagten sie, »deshalb wollen wir hier das ganze Jahr durch wohnen.« Der Schnee bedeckte das Gras mit seinem dicken, weißen Mantel, und der Frost bemalte alle Bäume mit Silber. Dann luden sie den Nordwind zum Besuch ein, und er kam. Er war in Pelze eingehüllt und brüllte den ganzen Tag im Garten herum und blies die Dachkamine herab. »Dies ist ein entzückender Platz,« sagte er; »wir müssen den Hagel bitten, herzukommen.« So kam der Hagel. Er rasselte jeden Tag drei Stunden lang auf das Dach der Burg, bis er fast alle Dachziegel zerbrochen hatte, und dann rannte er immer im Kreis durch den Garten, so schnell er nur konnte. Er war in Grau gekleidet, und sein Atem war wie Eis.

»Ich verstehe nicht, warum der Frühling solange ausbleibt,« sagte der selbstsüchtige Riese, als er am Fenster saß und auf seinen kalten, weißen Garten hinaussah; »hoffentlich gibt es einen Witterungsumschlag.«

Aber der Frühling kam überhaupt nicht, ebensowenig wie der Sommer. Der Herbst brachte in jeden Garten goldene Frucht, nur in des Riesen Garten brachte er keine. »Er ist zu selbstsüchtig,« sagte er. So war es denn dort immer Winter, und der Nordwind und der Hagel und der Frost und der Schnee tanzten zwischen den Bäumen umher.

Eines Morgens lag der Riese wach im Bett, da hörte er eine liebliche Musik. Sie klang so süß an seine Ohren, daß er glaubte, des Königs Musiker kämen vorbei. Es war in Wirklichkeit nur ein kleiner Hänfling, der draußen vor seinem Fenster sang, aber er hatte so lange Zeit keine Vögel mehr in seinem Garten singen hören, daß es ihm die schönste Musik von der Welt zu sein dünkte. Dann hörte der Hagel auf, über seinem Kopf zu tanzen, der Nordwind brüllte nicht mehr, und ein entzückender Duft kam durch den offenen Fensterflügel zu ihm. »Ich glaube, der Frühling ist endlich gekommen,« sagte der Riese; und er sprang aus dem Bett und schaute hinaus.

Was sah er?

Er sah das wundervollste Bild. Durch ein kleines Loch in der Mauer waren die Kinder hereingekrochen und saßen in den Zweigen der Bäume. Auf jedem Baum, den er sehen konnte, war ein kleines Kind. Und die Bäume waren so froh, die Kinder wiederzuhaben, daß sie sich selbst mit Blüten bedeckt hatten und ihre Arme zärtlich um die Köpfe der Kinder legten. Die Vögel flogen umher und zwitscherten vor Entzücken, und die Blumen blickten aus dem grünen Gras hervor und lachten. Es war ein lieblicher Anblick, nur in einer Ecke war noch Winter. Es war die äußerste Ecke des Gartens, und in ihr stand ein kleiner Knabe. Er war so winzig, daß er nicht bis zu den Zweigen des Baumes hinaufreichen konnte, und er wanderte immer um ihn herum und weinte bitterlich. Der arme Baum war noch ganz mit Eis und Schnee bedeckt, und der Nordwind blies und brüllte über ihn weg. »Klett're hinauf! kleiner Knabe,« sagte der Baum und bog seine Zweige hinab, soweit er konnte; aber der Knabe war zu winzig.

Und des Riesen Herz schmolz, als er hinausblickte. »Wie selbstsüchtig ich gewesen bin!« sagte er; »jetzt weiß ich, warum der Frühling nicht hierherkommen wollte. Ich werde den armen, kleinen Knaben oben auf den Baum setzen, und dann will ich die Mauer umstoßen, und mein Garten soll für alle Zeit der Spielplatz der Kinder sein.« Es war ihm wirklich sehr leid, was er getan hatte.

Er stieg hinab, öffnete ganz sanft die Vordertüre und ging hinaus in den Garten. Aber als ihn die Kinder sahen, waren sie so erschrocken, daß sie alle davonliefen, und es im Garten wieder Winter wurde. Nur der kleine Junge lief nicht fort, denn seine Augen waren so voll von Tränen, daß er den Riesen gar nicht kommen sah. Und der Riese stahl sich hinter ihn, nahm ihn behutsam in die Hand und setzte ihn auf den Baum. Und der Baum brach sofort in Blüten aus, und die Vögel kamen und sangen darauf, und der kleine Junge streckte seine beiden Arme aus, schlang sie rund um des Riesen Nacken und küßte ihn. Und als die anderen Kinder sahen, daß der Riese nicht mehr böse war, kamen sie zurückgerannt, und mit ihnen kam der Frühling. »Es ist jetzt euer Garten, kleine Kinder,« sagte der Riese, und er nahm eine große Axt und schlug die Mauer nieder. Und als die Leute um zwölf Uhr zum Markt gingen, da fanden sie den Riesen spielend mit den Kindern in dem schönsten Garten, den sie je gesehen hatten. Den ganzen Tag lang spielten sie, und des Abends kamen sie zum Riesen, um sich von ihm zu verabschieden.

»Aber wo ist euer kleiner Gefährte?« fragte er, »der Knabe, den ich auf den Baum setzte.« Der Riese liebte ihn am meisten, weil er ihn geküßt hatte.

»Wir wissen es nicht,« antworteten die Kinder; »er ist fortgegangen.«

»Ihr müßt ihm bestimmt sagen, daß er morgen wieder hierherkommt,« sagte der Riese. Aber die Kinder erklärten, sie wüßten nicht, wo er wohne, und hätten ihn nie vorher gesehen; und der Riese fühlte sich sehr betrübt.

Jeden Nachmittag, wenn die Schule vorbei war, kamen die Kinder und spielten mit dem Riesen. Aber der kleine Knabe, den der Riese liebte, wurde nie wieder gesehen. Der Riese war sehr gütig zu allen Kindern, aber er sehnte sich nach seinem ersten kleinen Freund und sprach oft von ihm. »Wie gerne möchte ich ihn sehen!« pflegte er zu sagen.

Jahre vergingen, und der Riese wurde sehr alt und schwach. Er konnte nicht mehr draußen spielen, und so saß er in einem hohen Lehnstuhl und beobachtete die Kinder bei ihren Spielen und bewunderte seinen Garten. »Ich habe viele schöne Blumen,« sagte er, »aber die Kinder sind die schönsten Blumen von allen.«

Eines Wintermorgens blickte er aus seinem Fenster hinaus, als er sich anzog. Er haßte jetzt den Winter nicht mehr, denn er wußte, daß er nur ein schlafender Frühling war, und daß die Blumen sich dann ausruhten.

Plötzlich rieb er sich die Augen vor Staunen und schaute atemlos hinaus. Es war wirklich ein wunderbarer Anblick. Im äußersten Winkel des Gartens war ein Baum ganz bedeckt mit lieblichen, weißen Blumen. Seine Zweige waren ganz golden, und silberne Früchte hingen von ihnen herab, und darunter stand der kleine Knabe, den er geliebt hatte.

In großer Freude rannte der Riese die Treppe hinab und hinaus in den Garten. Er eilte über das Gras und näherte sich dem Kinde. Als er dicht bei ihm war, wurde sein Gesicht rot vor Zorn, und er fragte: »Wer hat es gewagt, dich zu verwunden?« Denn aus den Handflächen des Kindes waren zwei Nägelmale, und zwei Nägelmale waren auf den kleinen Füßen.

»Wer hat es gewagt, dich zu verwunden?« schrie der Riese; »sage es mir, damit ich mein großes Schwert nehme und ihn erschlage.«

»Nein!« antwortete das Kind; »denn dies sind Wunden der Liebe.«

»Wer bist du?« fragte der Riese, und eine seltsame Ehrfurcht befiel ihn, und er kniete vor dem kleinen Kinde.

Und das Kind lächelte den Riesen an und sagte zu ihm: »Du ließest mich einmal in deinem Garten spielen; heute sollst du mit mir in meinen Garten kommen, der das Paradies ist.« Und als die Kinder an diesem Nachmittag hineinliefen, fanden sie den Riesen tot unter dem Baum liegen, ganz bedeckt mit weißen Blüten.