de-en  E.T.A. Hoffmann: Das Fräulein von Scuderi - 3
E.T.A. Hoffmann: Mademoiselle de Scuderi - 3 (http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/das-fraulein-von-scuderi-3084/1).

Baptiste's worries had a good reason. Just at that time, Paris was the scene of the most heinous atrocities, just at that time hell's most diabolic invention offered the easiest means for it.
Glaser, a German pharmacist, the best chemist of his time, was - as people of his science probably do - engaged in alchemical experiments. He had intended to find the philosopher's stone. He was joined by an Italian called Exili. But the art of gold-making served this man only as a pretext. Glaser hoped to find salvation in the toxins and only wanted to learn how to mix, boil, and sublimate them, when he finally succeeded in producing that subtle poison that was without odour and without taste, killing either on the spot or slowly, leaving absolutely no trace in the human body and deceiving all skills all knowledge of the physicians, who, not suspecting murder by poisoning, must ascribe death to a natural cause. Exili, as careful as he was in his work, was suspected of selling poison and was taken to the Bastille. Shortly afterwards Captain Godin de Sainte Croix was locked up in the same room. The latter had for a long time lived in a relationship with the Marquise de Brinvillier which brought dishonour to the whole family, and finally, since the Marquis did not care about the crimes of his wife, made her father, Dreux d'Aubray, Police lieutenant in Paris, obtain a warrant against the Captain separating the scarlet couple. Passionate, without character, dissembling piety and from early youth on prone to every vice, jealous including giving vent to his fury, nothing could be more welcome to the Captain than Exili's fiendish secret, giving the former the means to crush all his enemies. He became Exili's eager pupil and soon became his master's equal so that he, released from the Bastille, was able to carry on his work.
The Brinvillier was a degenerate woman, because of Sante Croix's influence she became a monster. By and by he made her poison first her own father, with whom she lived, caring for him in his old age in wicked hypocrisy, then her two brothers and finally her sister; her father for revenge, the others because of the rich inheritance. The story of several poisoners provides the terrible example that crimes of this kind become an irresistible passion. Without any further purpose, for the sheer pleasure of doing it, just as the chemist experiments for his own pleasure, poisoners have often murdered people, whose life or death is of total indifference to them. The sudden deaths of several poor people in the Hotel Dieu later raised suspicion that the bread loaves which the Brinvillier distributed there every week in order to be considered an example of piety and benefaction were poisoned. It is certain, however, that she poisoned pigeon pies and served them to the guests she had invided. The Chevalier du Guet and several other people fell victim to these fiendish meals. Sainte Croix, his helper la Chaussee, the Brinvillier knew for a long time how to shroud their hideous misdeeds with an impenetrable veil; but whichever wicked deceit of evil men there may be, the eternal power of the heavens has decided to judge the wicked already here on earth! The poisons that Sainte Croix prepared were so fine that if the powder (the Parisians called this "poudre de succession") was exposed during preparation, a single breath of it was sufficient to immediately cause death. That is why Sainte Croix wore a mask of fine glass when he performed his operations. One day this mask fell down just as he was going to pour a finished poison powder into a vial, and inhaling the fine powder of the poison, he immediately sank down dead. Since he had died without heirs, the courts rushed in to take his estate under seal. There, in a sealed box was found the entire infernal arsenal of murderous poisons that were at the disposal of the wicked Sainte Croix; in addition, Brinvillier's letters were discovered that left no doubt about her crimes. She fled to Liege to a monastery. Desgrais, an official of the Marechaussee was sent after her. Disguised as a clergyman he appeared in the monastery, where she had hidden. He succeeded in establishing a love affair with the terrible woman and enticed her to a secret meeting in a secluded garden outside the town. She had barely arrived there when she was surrounded by Desgrais' men. The spiritual lover suddenly changed into an officer of the Marechaussee and compelled her to climb into the wagon which stood by in front of the garden and, surrounded by his men, departed straightaway for Paris. LaChaussee had already been beheaded earlier and Brinvillier suffered the same death. Her body was burnt after her execution and her ashes were scattered into the air.
The Parisians sighed with relief that that monster had disappeared, who had been able to direct the secret murderous weapon against friend and foe without being punished. But soon it became known that La Croix's abominable art had been passed on. Like an invisible, treacherous ghost, murder crept into the innermost circles, as they can only form kinship – love – friendship, and safely and quickly captured the unfortunate victims. He whom one had seen in booming health today, was stumbling around sick and weak tomorrow, and no skill of the doctors could save him from death. Riches - a lucrative office - a pretty, perhaps too youthful wife - was enough for death to be calling. The most cruel mistrust separated the holiest tie. The husband was afraid of the wife- the father of the son- the sister of the brother. The food remained untouched, also the wine at the meal which the friend offered to the friends, and where else pleasure and jesting had waited, wild looks peered for the disguised murderer. You could see fathers buying foodstuff in distant areas and in preparing those themselves there in dirty kitchens because they were afraid of fiendish treachery in their own house. And yet sometimes the vastest, most deliberate precaution was in vain.
unit 1
E.T.A.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 2
Hoffmann: Das Fräulein von Scuderi - 3.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 3
(http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/das-fraulein-von-scuderi-3084/1).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 4
Baptistes Besorgnisse hatten ihren guten Grund.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 7
Er hatte es darauf abgesehen, den Stein der Weisen zu finden.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 8
Ihm gesellte sich ein Italiener zu, namens Exili.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 9
Diesem diente aber die Goldmacherkunst nur zum Vorwande.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 12
In dasselbe Zimmer sperrte man bald darauf den Hauptmann Godin de Sainte Croix ein.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 16
Die Brinvillier war ein entartetes Weib, durch Sainte Croix wurde sie zum Ungeheuer.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 25
Sainte Croix trug deshalb bei seinen Operationen eine Maske von feinem Glase.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 29
Sie floh nach Lüttich in ein Kloster.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 30
Desgrais, ein Beamter der Marechaussee, wurde ihr nachgesendet.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 31
Als Geistlicher verkleidet, erschien er in dem Kloster, wo sie sich verborgen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 40
Das grausamste Mißtrauen trennte die heiligsten Bande.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 44
Und doch war manchmal die größte, bedachteste Vorsicht vergebens.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago

E.T.A. Hoffmann: Das Fräulein von Scuderi - 3. (http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/das-fraulein-von-scuderi-3084/1).

Baptistes Besorgnisse hatten ihren guten Grund. Gerade zu der Zeit war Paris der Schauplatz der verruchtesten Greueltaten, gerade zu der Zeit bot die teuflischste Erfindung der Hölle die leichtesten Mittel dazu dar.
Glaser, ein teutscher Apotheker, der beste Diemiker seiner Zeit, beschäftigte sich, wie es bei Leuten von seiner Wissenschaft wohl zu geschehen pflegt, mit alchimistischen Versuchen. Er hatte es darauf abgesehen, den Stein der Weisen zu finden. Ihm gesellte sich ein Italiener zu, namens Exili. Diesem diente aber die Goldmacherkunst nur zum Vorwande. Nur das Mischen, Kochen, Sublimieren der Giftstoffe, in denen Glaser sein Heil zu finden hoffte, wollt' er erlernen, und es gelang ihm endlich, jenes feine Gift zu bereiten, das ohne Geruch, ohne Geschmack, entweder auf der Stelle oder langsam tötend, durchaus keine Spur im menschlichen Körper zurückläßt und alle Kunst, alle Wissenschaft der Ärzte täuscht, die, den Giftmord nicht ahnend, den Tod einer natürlichen Ursache zuschreiben müssen. So vorsichtig Exili auch zu Werke ging, so kam er doch in den Verdacht des Giftverkaufs und wurde nach der Bastille gebracht. In dasselbe Zimmer sperrte man bald darauf den Hauptmann Godin de Sainte Croix ein. Dieser hatte mit der Marquise de Brinvillier lange Zeit in einem Verhältnisse gelebt, welches Schande über die ganze Familie brachte, und endlich, da der Marquis unempfindlich blieb für die Verbrechen seiner Gemahlin, ihren Vater, Dreux d'Aubray, Zivil-Leutnant zu Paris, nötigte, das verbrecherische Paar durch einen Verhaftsbefehl zu trennen, den er wider den Hauptmann auswirkte. Leidenschaftlich, ohne Charakter, Frömmigkeit heuchelnd und zu Lastern aller Art geneigt von Jugend auf, eifersüchtig, rachsüchtig bis zur Wut, konnte dem Hauptmann nichts willkommner sein als Exilis teuflisches Geheimnis, das ihm die Macht gab, alle seine Feinde zu vernichten. Er wurde Exilis eifriger Schüler und tat es bald seinem Meister gleich, so daß er, aus der Bastille entlassen, allein fortzuarbeiten imstande war.
Die Brinvillier war ein entartetes Weib, durch Sainte Croix wurde sie zum Ungeheuer. Er vermochte sie nach und nach, erst ihren eignen Vater, bei dem sie sich befand, ihn mit verruchter Heuchelei im Alter pflegend, dann ihre beiden Brüder und endlich ihre Schwester zu vergiften; den Vater aus Rache, die andern der reichen Erbschaft wegen. Die Geschichte mehrerer Giftmörder gibt das entsetzliche Beispiel, daß Verbrechen der Art zur unwiderstehlichen Leidenschaft werden. Ohne weitern Zweck, aus reiner Lust daran, wie der Chemiker Experimente macht zu seinem Vergnügen, haben oft Giftmörder Personen gemordet, deren Leben oder Tod ihnen völlig gleich sein konnte. Das plötzliche Hinsterben mehrerer Armen im Hotel Dieu erregte später den Verdacht, daß die Brote, welche die Brinvillier dort wöchentlich auszuteilen pflegte, um als Muster der Frömmigkeit und des Wohltuns zu gelten, vergiftet waren. Gewiß ist es aber, daß sie Taubenpasteten vergiftete und sie den Gästen, die sie geladen, versetzte. Der Chevalier du Guet und mehrere andere Personen fielen als Opfer dieser höllischen Mahlzeiten. Sainte Croix, sein Gehilfe la Chaussee, die Brinvillier wußten lange Zeit hindurch ihre gräßliche Untaten in undurchdringliche Schleier zu hüllen; doch welche verruchte List verworfener Menschen vermag zu bestehen, hat die ewige Macht des Himmels beschlossen, schon hier auf Erden die Frevler zu richten! – Die Gifte, welche Sainte Croix bereitete, waren so fein, daß, lag das Pulver (poudre de succession nannten es die Pariser) bei der Bereitung offen, ein einziger Atemzug hinreichte, sich augenblicklich den Tod zu geben. Sainte Croix trug deshalb bei seinen Operationen eine Maske von feinem Glase. Diese fiel eines Tags, als er eben ein fertiges Giftpulver in eine Phiole schütten wollte, herab, und er sank, den feinen Staub des Giftes einatmend, augenblicklich tot nieder. Da er ohne Erben verstorben, eilten die Gerichte herbei, um den Nachlaß unter Siegel zu nehmen. Da fand sich in einer Kiste verschlossen das ganze höllische Arsenal des Giftmords, das dem verruchten Sainte Croix zu Gebote gestanden, aber auch die Briefe der Brinvillier wurden aufgefunden, die über ihre Untaten keinen Zweifel ließen. Sie floh nach Lüttich in ein Kloster. Desgrais, ein Beamter der Marechaussee, wurde ihr nachgesendet. Als Geistlicher verkleidet, erschien er in dem Kloster, wo sie sich verborgen. Es gelang ihm, mit dem entsetzlichen Weibe einen Liebeshandel anzuknüpfen und sie zu einer heimlichen Zusammenkunft in einem einsamen Garten vor der Stadt zu verlocken. Kaum dort angekommen, wurde sie aber von Desgrais' Häschern umringt, der geistliche Liebhaber verwandelte sich plötzlich in den Beamten der Marechaussee und nötigte sie, in den Wagen zu steigen, der vor dem Garten bereitstand und, von den Häschern umringt, geradeswegs nach Paris abfuhr. La Chaussee war schon früher enthauptet worden, die Brinvillier litt denselben Tod, ihr Körper wurde nach der Hinrichtung verbrannt und die Asche in die Lüfte zerstreut.
Die Pariser atmeten auf, als das Ungeheuer von der Welt war, das die heimliche mörderische Waffe ungestraft richten konnte gegen Feind und Freund. Doch bald tat es sich kund, daß des verruchten La Croix' entsetzliche Kunst sich fortvererbt hatte. Wie ein unsichtbares tückisches Gespenst schlich der Mord sich ein in die engsten Kreise, wie sie Verwandtschaft – Liebe – Freundschaft nur bilden können, und erfaßte sicher und schnell die unglücklichen Opfer. Der, den man heute in blühender Gesundheit gesehen, wankte morgen krank und siech umher, und keine Kunst der Ärzte konnte ihn vor dem Tode retten. Reichtum – ein einträgliches Amt – ein schönes, vielleicht zu jugendliches Weib – das genügte zur Verfolgung auf den Tod. Das grausamste Mißtrauen trennte die heiligsten Bande. Der Gatte zitterte vor der Gattin – der Vater vor dem Sohn – die Schwester vor dem Bruder. – Unberührt blieben die Speisen, blieb der Wein bei dem Mahl, das der Freund den Freunden gab, und wo sonst Lust und Scherz gewartet, spähten verwilderte Blicke nach dem verkappten Mörder. Man sah Familienväter ängstlich in entfernten Gegenden Lebensmittel einkaufen und in dieser, jener schmutzigen Garküche selbst bereiten, in ihrem eigenen Hause teuflischen Verrat fürchtend. Und doch war manchmal die größte, bedachteste Vorsicht vergebens.