de-en  Wunderbare Reise des kleinen Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen von Selma Lagerlöf - Kapitel 9: Karlskrona.
Chapter 9: Karlskrona
Saturday, 2 April.
It was a bright moonlit evening in Karlskrona.
Now the weather was pleasant and warm, during the day however it had rained and stormed and the people must have thought that it was still raining and storming because hardly anyone dared venture out onto street.
While the town lay there so forlorn, the wild goose Akka flew with his flock across Vämmön and Pantarholm towards Karlskrona.
They were still on their way in the late evening, looking for a suitable place to settle for the night out there on the archipelago; they could not remain on the mainland because Smirre the fox would track them down, regardless of where they alighted.
As the boy flew with the geese high up through the air and looked down upon the sea with its archipelago, everything gave the impression of being sinister and ghostly; the sky was no longer blue, but arched over him like a dome made of green glass, the sea was milky-white and as far as the eye could see, small white waves rolled with shimmering, silver crowns
Amid all this white the diversely formed islands towered coal-black out of the sea; whether big or small, covered with meadows or strewn with boulders, everything looked black, yes, even the homes and churches and windmills, that are usually white or red, stood out black against the green of the sky.
The boy almost had the feeling as if the earth below him had been substituted with another, so that he had arrived in a completely different world; he was just thinking how he wanted to be particularly brave this night and not be afraid, when he saw something that gave him an enormous fright.
It was a mountainous island covered with big sharp boulders and between these black rocks were sparkling areas of shimmering gold.
He could not help but think of the Maglestein of the wizard Ljungby which the wizard sometimes places on tall golden pillars, and he would like to have known whether this was something similar.
But the stones there, with the gold, would have been eventually seized, if the sea surrounding the island hadn't been teeming with enormous sea monsters.
They looked like whales and sharks and other huge sea monsters, but the boy was convinced that they were sea spirits that had gathered here and wanted to climb up and fight with the land spirits that lived there.
And those on the land were surely afraid, for the boy saw a huge giant standing right up on top of the island peak, who was stretching his arms up high as if in desperation about all the misfortune that would befall him and his island.
The boy was quite alarmed when he noticed that Akka was about to alight on this very island.
"Oh no, oh no!" he called out, "We are not really going to alight here, are we?"
But the geese descended lower and lower and now the boy was greatly astonished that he could have seen things so wrongly.
The great blocks of stone were nothing but houses.
The whole island was a town; the shining gold points were lanterns and rows of lighted windows; the giant standing atop the island was a church with two towers, and all the sea monsters and magicians that he had believed to see were boats and huge ships that were anchored around the island.
On this side of the island facing the mainland were armored warships, some with enormously thick smokestacks that were inclined backwards, then again longer and more narrowly built ships that could doubtlessly glide through the water like fish.
Which town could that possibly be? Well, the boy could find that out because he saw the many warships down there.
His whole life he'd been afraid of ships, although he'd never had anything to do with any, other than the small sailing boats he'd let float upon the village pond.
He knew full well, that this town, which lay there with so many warships, could only be Karlskrona.
The boy's grandfather had previously been a sailor on a warship, and as long as he lived, he had talked every day about Karlskrona, of the big shipyard and everything else that was there.
The boy felt quite at home here and was pleased that he was now able to see everything that he'd heard so much about.
Only during the flight did he see the tower and the fortifications that protected the harbor entrance as well as the many buildings out there in the shipyard, for Akku was settling down now on one of the flat-roofed church towers.
That was however a safe place for those who wished to give a fox the slip and the boy asked himself if he would dare to crawl underneath the gander's wing tonight; yes, he could indeed do that and it would surely do him good to be able to get some sleep again.
Next morning he then wanted to try to see more of the shipyard and the ships.
It seemed strange to the boy that he could not still and calmly wait till he would be able to see something of the ships.
He had hardly slept longer than five minutes when he slipped out from under the wing and climbed down to the ground via the lightning rod and the gutters.
Soon he stood on a large market place which spread out in front of the church; it was paved with rounded stones which were pointed at the top and walking on them was just as difficult for him as it was for big people to walk on a meadow full of clods of earth.
People who live in an undeveloped area and far out in the countryside always feel anxious when they go into a city where the houses stand stiff and erect and the streets and squares lie open so that anyone who is passing by can look at them – and if big people think that way, one can easily imagine how much more it had to affect the tomte.
As he stood on the Karskrona market place and looked at the German church, the town hall and the cathedral, from which he had just come down, he instinctively wished he was back up there on the church tower with the geese.
Fortunately the marketplace was completely empty.
No human could be seen, if one did not want to count the statue that stood on a high pedestal as a person.
The boy looked at the statue for a long time and would have liked to know who this big man with the tricorn, long tail coat, breeches, and rough shoes could be.
He held a long stick in his hand and looked as if he was also using it for he had terribly stern face with a big hawk nose and a hideous mouth.
"What is this fellow with the big lips doing here?" the boy finally said.
Never had he felt to small and miserable as he did this evening.
He tried to pull himself together by saying something cheeky and then, no longer thinking of the statue, he turned into a wide street that led down to the sea, but he had not walked for long when he heard that someone was coming up behind him.
From the marketplace someone was coming who stomped on the pavement with heavy feet and struck his cane on the ground; it sounded almost as if the big man made of bronze who stood over there in the marketplace was on the move.
The boy listened to the footsteps while he ran down the street and ever more clearly he recognised that it must be the man made of bronze.
The ground shook and the houses trembled, certainly no one else could walk like that and the boy took a fright when he remembered what he had said about him previously; he did not even dare to turn his head to check whether it was really him.
"Perhaps he is just taking a walk for his own pleasure," the boy continued to think, "he cannot possibly be angry with me because of a couple of words that I said about him – they were certainly not said with any evil intent."
Instead of going straight ahead and possibly ending up at the dockyard, the boy turned into a street that led east.
He wanted to avoid the person following him at any price.
But shortly afterwards he heard the bronze statue also turning into this street.
This frightened the boy so much that he simply did not know what to do; and it is very hard to find a hiding place in a town in which all doors are tightly locked! Then on his right he saw an old wooden church which stood in large grounds, set somewhat back from the street.
He did not hesitate for a moment but rushed to the church.
"If I can just get inside, I'll be protected from all evil!" he thought.
While he rushed there he suddenly saw a man on a sandy path who beckoned him.
"This is bound to be someone who wants to help me," the boy thought; he felt a lightness in his heart and hurried towards the man.
His fear had really made his heart beat faster.
But when he arrived at the man, standing on a little stool at the edge of the way, he hesitated extremely.
"He certainly can't have beckoned me," he thought, for now he saw that the whole man was made of wood.
He stopped in front of the man and looked at him.
He was a roughly carved fellow with short legs, with a wide red face, shiny black hair and a black, full beard.
He had a black wooden hat on his head, on his body a brown wooden skirt, around the middle a black wooden sash, on his legs he had wide, grey wooden trousers and stockings and on his feet black wooden shoes.
Besides, he had a coat of fresh paint and varnish so that he glittered and shone; and spring added its bit and gave him a sweet-tempered appearance that made the boy trust him right away.
On the path next to the man stood a wooden board, on which the boy read: "I very humbly ask you, can not speak well, come, give your mite for me, and put it into my hat!" Why of course the man was an alms box! The boy was really perplexed.
He had thought to have something particularly unusual in front of him; and now he remembered that his grandfather had spoken of this wooden man and said that all the children of Karlskrona liked him very much, and that must have been true, for the boy also found it difficult to part from the wooden man.
He had something about him so old-fashioned, one could think he was several hundred years old, and yet at the same time he looked strong and proud and full of life, just as the people in the olden days must have been.
It gave the boy so much pleasure to look at the wooden man that he totally forgot the other one from whom he had fled - but now he heard him again.
Oh dear! He also left the street and came into the churchyard.
He also went here after him! Where should the boy now flee to?
Just at this moment, he saw that the wooden man bowed and stretched out his broad, wooden hand.
One could not possibly imagine he was anything other than good, and with a jump the boy was standing on the wooden man's hand, and the wooden man raised him to his hat and tucked him underneath it.
Scarcely was the boy hidden, the wooden man had only just put his arm back in the right place, when the bronze one already stood in front of him and struck the ground so mightily with his staff that the wooden one was shaking on his stool.
Then the bronze one said in a loud metallic voice: "Who is He?" The wooden one raised his arm so that the old wood was creaking, putting his hand to the brim of his tricorn in salute and answered: "Rosenbohm, begging your pardon, Your Majesty, formerly chief boatswain on the liner Dristigheten, after military service guardian at the Admiral's Church, and finally carved in wood and put into the church yard as alms box."
The tomte got a fright as he heard the wooden man say "Your Majesty", for when he thought about it now, he remembered that the statue on the market place must represent the one who had founded the town.
So it was none other than Charles XI himself whom he had encountered.
"He knows how to give information about himself; so He can also tell me, whether He has seen a small boy who is roaming around the town this evening? He is an impudent scoundrel, and if I get hold of him, I will teach him some lessons."
With that he struck his stick once more on the ground and looked terribly grim.
Begging your pardon, Your Majesty, I have seen him, " said the wooden one; and the boy who sat huddled under the hat and could see the bronzen one through a crack in the wood started trembling violently in fear but he calmed down again when the wooden one continued: "Your Majesty is on the wrong track, the boy most certainly wanted to go to go to the shipyard to hide there."
"Does He really think so, Rosenbom? Well, then do not stand on your stool any longer but come with me and help find the little imp. Two heads are better than one, Rosenbom".
But the wooden fellow answered with a woebegone voice: "I humbly ask to be allowed to remain where I am; I look healthy and shining because I have just been freshly painted, but inside I am old and brittle and cannot tolerate any movement."
The bronze man is obviously one of those who can't take no for an answer.
"What kind of nonsense is this! Come on, you Rosenbom!" And he stretched out his long stick and gave the other one a booming blow on his shoulder.
Now He sees that He is as fit as a fiddle, Rosenbom.“
The two of them set off and wandered, imposing and formidable, through the streets of Karlskrona until they came to a large gateway that led to the dockyards.
In front of it stood a Navy soldier stands sentry duty; but the bronze one walked by him quite naturally and pushed the door open even without the sailor seeming to notice.
As soon as they passed the door, they saw a wide harbour, separated by wooden bridges, in front of them.
There were warships in the various harbour basins; these ones appeared nearby even larger and more terrifying than before, where the boy had seen them from above.
"It really wasn't so wrong that I held them to be sea monsters," he thought.
"Where does He think that we should look first, Rosenbom?" the bronze man asked.
"Such a fellow could most easily hide in the model hall," replied the wooden man.
On a small strip of land which ran along the right side of the harbour, stood very old buildings.
The bronzen man went to a house with low walls, square windows and an impressive roof; he pushed against the door with his stick so that it opened and stomped up a staircase with worn-out steps.
They came into a big hall filled with a lot of masted and rigged ships; without having been told by anyone, the boy knew that he saw here the models of the ships which had been built for the Swedish fleet.
There were many different types of ships: liners whose sides were lined with canons, which had mighty structures in front and behind and whose masts were a great confusion of sails and ropes.
There were also small coastal ships with rowing benches at the starboard and port sides, gun boats without decks, cannon sloops and richly gilded frigates; these were the models of the ships the kings had made use of on their journeys, and finally there were the heavy, wide armoured ships with turrets and cannons on the deck that are used today, as well as slender, shiny-black torpedo boats that looked like long, narrow fish.
While the boy was carried around between all these models he became quite perplexed: "Incredible that such big and proud ships have been built here in Sweden!" he thought.
He had plenty of time to look around, for while the bronze man looked at the models, he forgot everything else.
He examined them one after the other, from the first to the last and had Rosenbom, the chief boatman from Dristigheten explain everything that he knew; who the master builders were, who had captained them, what their fate had been; he told of Chapmann and Puke and Trolle, of Hogland and Svensksund, up to the year 1809, for after that year he had no longer been there.
He and the bronze man liked the old wooden ships best.
They didn't really quite know much about the new armored ships.
"I see that He does not know anything about the new ones, Rosenbom," said the bronze man.
"Now, therefore, let's go and see something else, because that's fun, Rosenbom."
Now he surely no longer thought about searching for the boy, who felt quite safe and comfortable under the wooden hat.
The two men walked through the large workshops, through the canvas sewing room and the anchor blacksmith shop, through the machine and carpenter shops.
They saw the tall cranes and the docks, the great storage houses, the artillery yard, the arsenal, the long area for the ropery and the large, abandoned dock that had been blasted out of the rock.
They walked out along the plankbridges where the warships were moored, went on board the ships and looked at them like two old salts, asked and rejected and approved and got annoyed.
The boy sat safely underneath the wooden hat and listened to them tell of the work and the arguments that had taken place here in order to get the ships fully equipped and ready.
He heard how life and limb had been risked, how the last penny had been given for these ships, how skilled men had done their utmost to improve and perfect these vessels which defended and protected the fatherland.
In spite of himself tears welled up in the boy's eyes several times when he heard talk of all that and he was glad that he got so much detailed information about it.
Finally they came to an open yard where the figureheads of the old liners were on display; the boy had never seen anything more bizarre, for the figures that hung there had unbelievably large and frightening faces.
They looked big, bold and wild, filled with the same proud spirit that once had outfitted the big ships; they were the fruits of another time and of different hands.
It seemed to the boy as if he would completely dwarf before them, but when they had reached them, the bronze man said to the wooden one: "Do take your hat off to those who stand here, Rosenbom! They have all been in battle for their country".
But like the bronze man, Rosenbom had also forgotten why they had started their walk; without reflecting at all he raised his hat and shouted: "I take off my hat to him who chose the harbor, who laid the grounds for the shipyard and created a new fleet, to the king who initiated all this here!"
"Thank you Rosenbom, that was well said. He is a splendid man, Rosenbom. But, what has he got there, Rosenbom?"
For Nils Holgersson stood in the middle of Rosenbom's bare head, but now he wasn't afraid any more but waved his white cap and shouted: "A hurrah for you, big lips!"
The boy shouted so loudly that he woke himself up, and then he realised to his great astonishment that he had dreamt everything and that he was still with the geese on the roof of the church.
unit 1
Kapitel 9: Karlskrona.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 2
Samstag, 2 April.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 3
Es war Abend in Karlskrona und heller Mondschein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 16
„Ach nein, ach nein!“ rief er, „Wir werden uns doch da nicht niederlassen sollen?“.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 18
Die großen Steinblöcke waren nichts andres als Häuser.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 21
Welche Stadt konnte nun das wohl sein?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 35
Zum Glück war der Marktplatz ganz leer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 39
„Was hat denn dieser Lippenfritze hier zu tun?“ sagte der Junge schließlich.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 40
Noch nie hatte er sich so klein und ärmlich gefühlt wie an diesem Abend.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 47
Er wollte dem, der hinter ihm herkam, um jeden Preis ausweichen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 48
Aber gleich darauf hörte er den Bronzenen auch in diese Straße einbiegen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 51
Er bedachte sich nicht einen Augenblick, sondern stürzte auf die Kirche zu.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 52
„Wenn ich nur hineinkomme, werde ich wohl vor allem Übel beschützt sein!“ meinte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 53
Während er dahinstürmte, sah er plötzlich einen Mann auf einem Sandweg stehen, der ihm winkte.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 55
Er hatte wirklich Herzklopfen vor lauter Angst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 58
Er blieb vor dem Mann stehen und betrachtete ihn.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 63
Der Junge war ganz verdutzt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 67
O weh!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 68
auch er verließ die Straße und kam in den Kirchhof herein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 69
Er ging ihm auch hierher nach!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 70
Wohin sollte der Junge nun flüchten?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 76
Es war also niemand Geringeres als Karl XI selbst, mit dem er zusammengetroffen war.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 78
unit 81
„Meint Er das, Rosenbom?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 83
Vier Augen sehen besser als zwei, Rosenbom“.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 85
Der Bronzene gehörte sicherlich zu denen, die keinen Widerspruch vertragen können.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 86
„Was sind das für Flausen!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 88
„Da sieht Er, daß Er hält, Rosenbom“.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 94
„Wo meint Er, daß wir zuerst suchen sollen, Rosenbom?“ fragte der Bronzene.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 104
Ihm und dem Bronzenen gefielen die alten Holzschiffe am besten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 105
Auf die neuen Panzerschiffe schienen sie sich nicht so recht zu verstehen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 106
„Ich sehe, daß Er von den neuen da nichts weiß, Rosenbom,“ sagte der Bronzene.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 107
unit 118
Sie alle sind für das Vaterland im Kampf gewesen“.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 120
„Danke, Rosenbom, das war gut gesagt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 121
Er ist ein prächtiger Mann, Rosenbom.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 122
Aber was hat Er denn da, Rosenbom?“.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented  2 days, 20 hours ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented  1 month ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 120  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 76  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 75  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 62  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 73  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 71  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 64  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 54  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 19  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 52  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 17  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 51  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 124  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 115  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 14  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 13  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 121  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 120  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 122  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 39  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 37  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 4  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 8  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 9  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 7  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 3  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 46  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 43  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 40  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented  1 month, 1 week ago

THE WONDERFUL ADVENTURES of NILS by SELMA LAGERLÖF.
Translated from the Swedish by Velma Swanston Howard.

by Merlin57 2 days, 20 hours ago

Thanks for the upload, Wendy:))

by bf2010 1 month ago

In preparing this text for uploading, I have removed full stops where they cause an unnecessary break in a sentence, or I have added one after ". so that the quotation marks remain with the speech rather than ending up at the start of the next unit, which usually causes confusion.
When translating into English, please feel free to translate according to how the punctuation would be used in English, rather than adhering strictly to the punctuation presented in the text.
Previously it was Bernard who was uploading this story, however as it is no longer available to people in Germany, I have arranged with him that I will upload succeeding chapters of the story. Thanks Bernard :-)
Happy translating.

by Merlin57 1 month, 1 week ago

Kapitel 9: Karlskrona.
Samstag, 2 April.
Es war Abend in Karlskrona und heller Mondschein.
Jetzt herrschte warmes, schönes Wetter, am Tage aber hatte es gestürmt und geregnet, und die Menschen meinten sicher, es regne und stürme noch immer, denn kaum einer von ihnen wagte sich auf die Straße hinaus.
Während die Stadt so verlassen dalag, kam die Wildgans Akka mit ihrer Schar über Vämmön und Pantarholm auf Karlskrona zugeflogen.
Sie waren spät abends noch unterwegs, sich einen sichern Schlafplatz draußen auf den Schären zu suchen; auf dem Lande konnten sie nicht bleiben, weil der Fuchs Smirre sie immer wieder aufstöberte, wo sie sich auch niederlassen mochten.
Als nun der Junge hoch oben durch die Luft ritt und auf das Meer mit seinen Schären hinuntersah, kam ihm alles merkwürdig unheimlich und gespensterhaft vor; der Himmel war nicht mehr blau, sondern wölbte sich über ihm wie eine Kuppel aus grünem Glas, das Meer war milchweiß, und so weit das Auge reichte, rollte es in kleinen, weißen Wogen mit silberschimmernden Schaumkronen daher.
Mitten in all diesem Weiß ragten die vielgestalteten Inseln kohlschwarz heraus; ob sie groß oder klein waren, ob eben wie Wiesen oder mit wilden Felsstücken bedeckt, alle sahen gleich schwarz aus, ja, sogar auch die Wohnhäuser und Kirchen und Windmühlen, die gewöhnlich weiß oder rot sind, zeichneten sich schwarz von dem grünen Himmel ab.
Der Junge hatte beinahe das Gefühl, als sei die Erde unter ihm vertauscht worden, so daß er in eine ganz andre Welt gekommen sei; er dachte eben, in dieser Nacht wolle er recht tapfer sein und sich nicht fürchten, als er etwas erblickte, was ihm einen großen Schrecken einjagte.
Das war eine bergige Insel, die mit großen, scharfen Felsblöcken bedeckt war, und zwischen diesen schwarzen Blöcken glänzten funkelnde Stellen von schimmerndem Golde.
Er mußte unwillkürlich an den Maglestein von dem Zauberer Ljungby denken, den der Zauberer zuweilen auf hohe goldne Säulen stellt, und er hätte gerne gewußt, ob dies etwas Ähnliches sei.
Aber die Steine da mit dem Gold wären schließlich noch angegangen, wenn es nicht rings um die Insel von lauter großen Meeresungetümen gewimmelt hätte.
Sie sahen wie Wal- und Haifische und andre große Meeresungeheuer aus, aber der Junge war dafür, daß es Meergeister seien, die sich hier versammelt hatten und hinaufklettern wollten, um mit den dort wohnenden Landgeistern zu kämpfen.
Und die auf dem Lande fürchteten sich sicher, denn der Junge sah einen großen Riesen ganz oben auf dem Gipfel der Insel stehen, der die Arme in die Höhe reckte wie in Verzweiflung über all das Unglück, das ihm und seiner Insel widerfahren sollte.
Der Junge erschrak nicht wenig, als er merkte, daß Akka sich gerade auf diese Insel niedersinken ließ.
„Ach nein, ach nein!“ rief er, „Wir werden uns doch da nicht niederlassen sollen?“.
Aber die Gänse sanken immer tiefer, und jetzt war der Junge aufs höchste überrascht, daß er so verkehrt hatte sehen können.
Die großen Steinblöcke waren nichts andres als Häuser.
Die ganze Insel war eine Stadt; die glänzenden, goldnen Punkte waren Laternen und erleuchtete Fensterreihen; der Riese, der ganz oben auf der Insel stand, war eine Kirche mit zwei Türmen, und alle die Meeresungeheuer und Zauberer, die er zu sehen geglaubt hatte waren Boote und große Schiffe, die rings um die Insel herum verankert waren.
Auf dieser dem Lande zugelegnen Seite der Insel lagen gepanzerte Kriegsschiffe, einige mit ungeheuer dicken, nach rückwärts geneigten Schornsteinen, dann wieder länger und schmäler gebaute, die sicherlich wie Fische durchs Wasser gleiten konnten.
Welche Stadt konnte nun das wohl sein? Ja, das konnte der Junge schon herausbringen, weil er die vielen Kriegsschiffe da unten sah.
Sein ganzes Leben lang hatte er Angst vor Schiffen gehabt, obgleich er nie mit andern etwas zu tun gehabt hatte als mit den kleinen Segelbooten, die er auf dem Dorfteich hatte schwimmen lassen.
Er wußte wohl, daß diese Stadt, die mit so vielen Kriegsschiffen dort lag, nur Karlskrona sein konnte.
Der Großvater des Jungen war früher Matrose auf einem Kriegsschiff gewesen, und so lange er lebte, hatte er jeden Tag von Karlskrona erzählt, von der großen Werft und allem andern, was es da gab.
Hier fühlte sich der Junge ganz wie zu Hause, und er freute sich, daß er jetzt das alles sehen durfte, von dem er so viel hatte erzählen hören.
Nur im Fluge sah er den Turm und die Festungswerke, die den Hafeneingang abschließen, sowie die vielen Gebäude draußen auf der Werft, denn jetzt ließ sich Akka auf einem von den flachgedeckten Kirchtürmen nieder.
Das war allerdings ein sichrer Platz für solche, die einem Fuchse entwischen wollten, und der Junge fragte sich, ob er es nicht wagen könnte, in dieser Nacht wieder unter die Flügel des Gänserichs zu kriechen; ja, das konnte er bestimmt, und es würde ihm sicher gut tun, wenn er wieder einmal ein bißchen schlafen dürfte.
Am nächsten Morgen wollte er dann versuchen, etwas mehr von der Werft und den Schiffen zu sehen.
Dem Jungen kam es selbst sonderbar vor, daß er sich nicht ruhig verhalten und still warten konnte, bis er etwas von den Schiffen zu sehen bekäme.
Er hatte sicher noch keine fünf Minuten geschlafen, als er unter dem Flügel hervorglitt und am Blitzableiter und an den Dachrinnen auf den Boden hinunterkletterte.
Bald stand er auf einem großen Marktplatz, der sich vor der Kirche ausbreitete; er war mit rundlichen, oben zugespitzten Steinen gepflastert, und das Gehen darauf war ebenso beschwerlich für ihn, wie für große Leute das Gehen auf einer Wiese voll Erdschollen.
Leute, die in einer unbebauten Gegend und weit draußen auf dem Lande wohnen, fühlen sich immer ängstlich, wenn sie in eine Stadt kommen, wo die Häuser steif und aufrecht dastehen und die Straßen und Plätze offen daliegen, so daß sie jeder, der vorübergeht, betrachten kann - und wenn große Leute so denken, kann man sich leicht vorstellen, wieviel mehr es dem Däumling so gehen mußte.
Als er auf dem Markt von Karlskrona stand und die Deutsche Kirche und das Rathaus und den Dom, von dem er gerade heruntergekommen war, sah, wünschte er sich unwillkürlich zu den Gänsen droben auf dem Kirchturm zurück.
Zum Glück war der Marktplatz ganz leer.
Kein Mensch war zu sehen, wenn man nicht etwa ein Standbild, das auf einem hohen Sockel stand, für einen solchen rechnen wollte.
Der Junge betrachtete das Standbild lange und hätte gerne gewußt, wer dieser große Mann in Dreispitz, langem Rock, Kniehosen und groben Schuhen sei.
Er hielt einen langen Stock in der Hand und sah aus, als mache er auch Gebrauch davon, denn er hatte ein furchtbar strenges Gesicht mit einer großen Habichtsnase und einem häßlichen Mund.
„Was hat denn dieser Lippenfritze hier zu tun?“ sagte der Junge schließlich.
Noch nie hatte er sich so klein und ärmlich gefühlt wie an diesem Abend.
Er versuchte sich aufzuraffen, indem er etwas Keckes sagte, dann dachte er nicht mehr an das Standbild, sondern bog in eine breite Straße ein, die zum Meer hinunterführte, aber er war noch nicht lange gegangen, als er hörte, daß jemand hinter ihm herkam.
Vom Markt her kam jemand, der mit schweren Füßen auf das Pflaster stampfte und seinen Stock auf den Boden aufstieß; es klang fast, als hätte der große Mann aus Bronze, der drüben auf dem Markte stand, sich auf den Weg gemacht.
Der Junge horchte auf die Schritte, während er die Straße hinunterlief, und immer deutlicher erkannte er, daß es der Mann aus Bronze sein mußte.
Die Erde bebte und die Häuser zitterten, sicherlich konnte niemand anders so gehen und der Junge erschrak, als ihm einfiel, was er vorhin über ihn gesagt hatte; er wagte nicht einmal den Kopf zu drehen, um nachzusehen, ob er es wirklich sei.
„Er geht vielleicht nur zu seinem eignen Vergnügen spazieren,“ dachte der Junge weiter, „Wegen der paar Worte, die ich über ihn gesagt habe, kann er doch unmöglich böse auf mich sein - es war ja gar nicht schlimm gemeint“.
Anstatt nun geradeaus zu gehen, um womöglich an die Werft zu gelangen, bog der Junge in eine nach Osten führende Straße ein.
Er wollte dem, der hinter ihm herkam, um jeden Preis ausweichen.
Aber gleich darauf hörte er den Bronzenen auch in diese Straße einbiegen.
Da erschrak der Junge so sehr, daß er einfach nicht wußte, was er tun sollte; und wie schwer ist es, einen Schlupfwinkel zu finden in einer Stadt, wo alle Türen fest verschlossen sind! Da sah er zu seiner Rechten eine alte aus Holz gebaute Kirche, die etwas abseits von der Straße in einer großen Anlage stand.
Er bedachte sich nicht einen Augenblick, sondern stürzte auf die Kirche zu.
„Wenn ich nur hineinkomme, werde ich wohl vor allem Übel beschützt sein!“ meinte er.
Während er dahinstürmte, sah er plötzlich einen Mann auf einem Sandweg stehen, der ihm winkte.
„Das ist gewiß jemand, der mir helfen will,“ dachte der Junge; es wurde ihm ganz leicht ums Herz, und er eilte auf den Mann zu.
Er hatte wirklich Herzklopfen vor lauter Angst.
Aber als er bei dem Mann angekommen war, der am Rande des Weges auf einem kleinen Schemel stand, stutzte er sehr.
„Der kann mir doch nicht gewinkt haben,“ dachte er; denn jetzt sah er, daß der ganze Mann aus Holz war.
Er blieb vor dem Mann stehen und betrachtete ihn.
Es war ein grobgeschnittener Kerl mit kurzen Beinen, breitem rotem Gesicht, glänzendem schwarzem Haar und einem schwarzen Vollbart.
Er hatte einen schwarzen hölzernen Hut auf dem Kopf, auf dem Leib einen braunen hölzernen Rock, um die Mitte eine schwarze hölzerne Schärpe, an den Beinen weite, graue hölzerne Hosen und Strümpfe und an den Füßen schwarze Holzschuhe.
Er war überdies frisch gestrichen und gefirnist, so daß er im Mondschein glänzte und gleiste; und der Frühling tat auch noch das Seinige dazu und gab ihm ein so gutmütiges Aussehen, daß der Junge sogleich Vertrauen zu ihm faßte.
Neben dem Mann auf dem Wege stand eine Holztafel, und auf dieser las der Junge:
„Ich bitt euch ganz demütiglich,Kann sprechen zwar nicht gut,Kommt, gebt ein Scherflein her für michUnd legts in meinen Hut!“
Ach freilich, der Mann war eine Armenbüchse! Der Junge war ganz verdutzt.
Er hatte geglaubt, etwas ganz besonders Merkwürdiges vor sich zu haben; und jetzt erinnerte er sich auch, daß der Großvater von diesem hölzernen Manne gesprochen und gesagt hatte, alle Kinder von Karlskrona hätten ihn sehr gern, und das mußte wohl wahr sein, denn auch dem Jungen fiel es schwer, sich von dem hölzernen Mann zu trennen.
Er hatte etwas so Altmodisches, man konnte ihn für viele hundert Jahre alt halten, und zugleich sah er doch stark und stolz und lebenslustig aus, gerade wie die Leute in alten Zeiten gewesen sein mußten.
Es machte dem Jungen so viel Vergnügen, den hölzernen Mann anzusehen, daß er den andern, vor dem er geflohen war, ganz vergaß - aber jetzt hörte er ihn wieder.
O weh! auch er verließ die Straße und kam in den Kirchhof herein.
Er ging ihm auch hierher nach! Wohin sollte der Junge nun flüchten?
Gerade in diesem Augenblick sah er, daß der Hölzerne sich verbeugte und seine breite hölzerne Hand ausstreckte.
Man konnte ihm unmöglich etwas andres als Gutes zutrauen, und mit einem Satz stand ihm der Junge auf der Hand, und der Hölzerne hob ihn zu seinem Hut empor und steckte ihn darunter.
Kaum war der Junge versteckt, kaum hatte der Hölzerne den Arm wieder an seinen richtigen Platz getan, als der Bronzene auch schon vor ihm stand und mit seinem Stock so gewaltig auf den Boden stieß, daß der Hölzerne auf seinem Schemel erzitterte.
Hierauf sagte der Bronzene mit lauter metallener Stimme: „Wer ist Er?“
Der Arm des Hölzernen fuhr hinauf, daß es in dem alten Holzwerk knackte, er legte die Hand an den Hutrand und antwortete: „Rosenbom, mit Verlaub, Eure Majestät, früher Oberbootsmann auf dem Linienschiff Dristigheten, nach beendigtem Kriegsdienst Kirchenwächter bei der Admiralskirche, schließlich in Holz geschnitten und als Armenbüchse auf dem Kirchhof aufgestellt“.
Däumling fuhr zusammen, als er den Hölzernen „Eure Majestät“ sagen hörte, denn wenn er jetzt darüber nachdachte, so fiel ihm allerdings ein, daß das Standbild auf dem Markt den vorstellen mußte, der die Stadt gegründet hatte.
Es war also niemand Geringeres als Karl XI selbst, mit dem er zusammengetroffen war.
„Er versteht es, Auskunft über sich zu geben; kann Er mir nun auch sagen, ob Er nicht einen kleinen Jungen gesehen hat, der heute Nacht in der Stadt herumstrolcht? Es ist eine naseweise Kanaille, und wenn ich ihn fasse, werde ich ihn Mores lehren“.
Damit stieß er seinen Stock noch einmal auf den Boden und sah schrecklich grimmig drein.
„Mit Verlaub, Eure Majestät, ich hab ihn gesehen,“ sagte der Hölzerne; und der Junge, der unter dem Hut zusammengekauert saß und durch eine Ritze im Holz den Bronzenen sehen konnte, begann vor Angst heftig zu zittern, aber er beruhigte sich wieder, als der Hölzerne fortfuhr: „Eure Majestät ist auf falscher Fährte, der Junge wollte gewiß auf die Werft, um sich dort zu verstecken“.
„Meint Er das, Rosenbom? Nun, dann bleib Er nicht länger auf seinem Schemel stehen, sondern komm Er mit mir und helf Er mir, den kleinen Kerl zu suchen. Vier Augen sehen besser als zwei, Rosenbom“.
Aber der Hölzerne antwortete mit jammervoller Stimme: „Ich möchte untertänigst bitten, dableiben zu dürfen, wo ich bin; ich sehe gesund und glänzend aus, weil man mich eben frisch angestrichen hat, aber innerlich bin ich alt und gichtbrüchig und kann keine Motion vertragen“.
Der Bronzene gehörte sicherlich zu denen, die keinen Widerspruch vertragen können.
„Was sind das für Flausen! Komm Er nur, Rosenbom!“ Und er streckte seinen langen Stock aus und versetzte dem andern einen dröhnenden Schlag auf die Schulter.
„Da sieht Er, daß Er hält, Rosenbom“.
Die beiden machten sich also auf den Weg und wanderten stattlich und gewaltig durch die Straßen von Karlskrona, bis sie an ein großes Tor kamen, das zur Werft führte.
Davor stand ein Marinesoldat Schildwache; aber der Bronzene ging wie selbstverständlich an ihm vorbei und stieß die Tür auf, ohne daß es der Matrose zu bemerken schien.
Sobald sie durch das Tor hindurchgeschritten waren, sahen sie einen weiten, durch hölzerne Brücken abgeteilten Hafen vor sich.
In den verschiedenen Hafenbecken lagen Kriegsschiffe; diese erschienen in der Nähe noch größer und schreckenerregender als vorher, wo der Junge sie von oben herab gesehen hatte.
„Es war doch nicht so ganz verkehrt, wenn ich sie für Meeresungeheuer hielt,“ dachte er.
„Wo meint Er, daß wir zuerst suchen sollen, Rosenbom?“ fragte der Bronzene.
„So einer könnte sich am allerleichtesten im Modellsaal verstecken,“ antwortete der Hölzerne.
Auf einem schmalen Streifen Land, der rechts dem ganzen Hafen entlang lief, lagen altertümliche Gebäude.
Der Bronzene ging auf ein Haus mit niedrigen Mauern, viereckigen Fenstern und einem ansehnlichen Dach zu; er stieß mit seinem Stock gegen die Tür, daß sie aufsprang, und stapfte eine Treppe mit ausgetretenen Stufen hinauf.
Sie kamen in einen großen Saal, der mit einer Menge bemasteter und aufgetakelter Schiffe angefüllt war; ohne daß es ihm jemand gesagt hätte, wußte der Junge, daß er hier die Modelle zu den Schiffen sah, die für die schwedische Flotte gebaut worden waren.
Es gab viele verschiedene Arten von Schiffen: alte Linienschiffe, deren Seiten mit Kanonen gespickt waren, die vorne und hinten mächtige Aufbauten hatten und deren Masten einen großen Wirrwarr von Segel und Tauen zeigten.
Ferner kleine Küstenschiffe mit Ruderbänken an den Seiten, unbedeckte Kanonenschaluppen und reich vergoldete Fregatten; das waren die Modelle von den Schiffen, deren sich die Könige auf ihren Reisen bedient hatten, und endlich waren da auch die schweren, breiten Panzerschiffe mit Türmen und Kanonen auf dem Verdeck, die heutigentags gebraucht werden, sowie schlanke, schwarzglänzende Torpedoboote, die wie lange schmale Fische aussahen.
Während der Junge zwischen all diesem herumgetragen wurde, wurde er ganz verdutzt: „Nein, daß so große und stolze Schiffe hier in Schweden gebaut worden sind!“ dachte er.
Er hatte gut Zeit, sich umzusehen, denn als der Bronzene die Modelle sah, vergaß er alles andre.
Er betrachtete sie der Reihe nach, vom ersten bis zum letzten, und ließ sie sich erklären, und Rosenbom, der Oberbootsmann von Dristigheten, erzählte alles, was er wußte, wer die Baumeister gewesen waren, wer sie geführt hatte, und welches Schicksal sie gehabt hatten; von Chapmann und Puke und Trolle, von Hogland und Svensksund erzählte er, bis zum Jahre 1809, denn von da an war er nicht mehr dabei gewesen.
Ihm und dem Bronzenen gefielen die alten Holzschiffe am besten.
Auf die neuen Panzerschiffe schienen sie sich nicht so recht zu verstehen.
„Ich sehe, daß Er von den neuen da nichts weiß, Rosenbom,“ sagte der Bronzene.
„Wir wollen deshalb jetzt gehen und etwas andres ansehen, denn das macht mir Spaß, Rosenbom“.
Jetzt dachte er gewiß nicht mehr daran, den Jungen zu suchen, und dieser fühlte sich unter dem hölzernen Hut ganz sicher und behaglich.
Die beiden Männer gingen durch die großen Werkstätten, durch die Segelnähereien und die Ankerschmieden, durch die Maschinen- und Schreinerwerkstätten.
Sie besahen die hohen Kranen und die Docks, die großen Vorratshäuser, den Artilleriehof, das Zeughaus, die lange Seilerbahn und das große verlassene Dock, das aus den Felsen herausgesprengt worden war.
Sie gingen auf die Bohlenbrücken hinaus, wo die Kriegsschiffe verankert lagen, begaben sich an Bord der Schiffe und betrachteten sie wie zwei alte Seebären, fragten und verwarfen und billigten und ärgerten sich.
Der Junge saß sicher unter dem hölzernen Hut und hörte sie erzählen, wie auf diesem Platz gearbeitet und gestritten worden war, um die hier ausgerüsteten Schiffe fertigzustellen.
Er hörte, wie man Leib und Leben aufs Spiel gesetzt hatte, wie das letzte Scherflein für diese Schiffe geopfert worden war, wie talentvolle Männer ihre ganze Kraft eingesetzt hatten, diese Fahrzeuge, die das Vaterland verteidigten und beschützten, zu verbessern und zu vervollkommnen.
Dem Jungen traten ein paarmal unwillkürlich die Tränen in die Augen, als er von diesem allem erzählen hörte, und er freute sich, daß er so genaue Auskunft darüber erhielt.
Ganz zuletzt kamen sie auf einen offnen Hof, wo die Galionsfiguren von alten Linienschiffen aufgestellt waren, und etwas Merkwürdigeres hatte der Junge noch nie gesehen, denn die Figuren, die da hingen, hatten unglaublich große, schreckenerregende Gesichter.
Groß, kühn und wild sahen sie aus, von demselben stolzen Geist erfüllt, der einst die großen Schiffe ausgerüstet hatte; sie waren von einer andern Zeit und von andern Händen hervorgebracht worden.
Dem Jungen war es, als schrumpfe er vor ihnen ganz zusammen, aber als sie hierhergelangt waren, sagte der bronzene Mann zu dem hölzernen: „Nehm Er vor denen, die hier stehen, den Hut ab, Rosenbom! Sie alle sind für das Vaterland im Kampf gewesen“.
Aber ebenso wie der Bronzene hatte auch Rosenbom vergessen, warum sie die Wanderung begonnen hatten; ohne sich einen Augenblick zu besinnen, lüpfte er seinen Hut und rief: „Ich nehme meinen Hut ab vor dem, der den Hafen auserwählte, der den Grund zur Werft legte und eine neue Flotte schuf, vor dem König, der dies alles hier ins Leben gerufen hat!“.
„Danke, Rosenbom, das war gut gesagt. Er ist ein prächtiger Mann, Rosenbom. Aber was hat Er denn da, Rosenbom?“.
Denn Nils Holgersson stand mitten auf Rosenboms kahlem Schädel, aber er hatte jetzt keine Angst mehr, sondern schwang seine weiße Mütze und rief: „Ein Hurra für dich, Lippenfritze!“.
Er schrie so laut, daß er erwachte, und da merkte er zu seiner großen Verwunderung, daß er alles miteinander geträumt hatte, und daß er noch immer bei den Gänsen auf dem Kirchendach war.