de-en  E.T.A. Hoffmann: Das Fräulein von Scuderi - 2
Mademoiselle de Scuderi -2 - (http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/das-fraulein-von-scuderi-3084/1). Scarcely had she opened the door than a figure wrapped in an overcoat pushed recklessly inside, calling out in a wild voice as he passed the Martiniere in the hallway: 'Take me to your mistress!".
Startled, the Martiniere raised the candlestick higher and the candlelight fell upon a deathly pale, terribly disfigured youthful face. The Martiniere might have fallen to the ground in horror when the man opened his coat and the bare handle of a stiletto projected out of the bib. The man glared at her with sparkling eyes and shouted even more fiercely than before: "I am telling you, take me to your mistress!" The Martiniere now saw that her mistress was in the most desperate danger. All the love for the dear Reign of God, in which she likewise venerated the devout, faithful Mother of God, blazed more strongly within her and brought forth a courage that she probably believed herself incapable of. She quickly slammed her chamber door shut that she had left open, stepped in front of it and spoke strongly and firmly: "In fact, your mad behavior here in the house poorly matches your pathetic words outside there, which, as I now indeed realize, had aroused my sympathy very much at an inappropriate time. You should not and will not speak with my lady now. If you have no evil intentions and needn't eschew the light of day, come back tomorrow and state your business! - now clear off from this house!" The man uttered a dull sigh, stared rigidly at the Martiniere with a horrible look and reached for the stiletto. The Martiniere quietly commended her soul to the Lord but remained firm and boldly confronted the man, while she firmly pushed herself against the chamber door that the man would have to go through in order to reach the mistress. " Let me see your lady, I tell you", the person shouted again. "Do what you will," replied the Martiniere, "I will not move from this spot; just complete the evil deed you've begun, you too will find the ignominious death on Greveplatz, like your comrades in arms." " Ha", the person cried out, "you're right, la Martiniere! I look like and I am armed like a wicked robber and murderer, but my fellows are not judged, they are not judged ones. - And with that, glancing venomously on the mortally scared woman, he pulled out the stiletto. "Jesus!" she shouted waiting for the deathblow; but at that very moment the clang of arms and the horses' footsteps could be heard from the street. "The provost guard - the provost guard. Help, help!" the Martiniere shouted. " Horrible woman, you want my ruin - now everything is over, everything over! - take this! - take this and give it to your mistress this very day - tomorrow, if you want to - " murmuring this softly the man had torn away the candlestick from Martiniere, extinguished the candles and put a small box in her hands. "For the sake of your salvation, pass the box to the lady," cried the man, and jumped out of the house. Martiniere had sunk to the ground, with an effort she got up and groped back to her chamber in darkness where she sunk into into her armchair completely exhausted, unable to make a sound. Now she heard the keys rattling which she had left sticking in the lock of the front door. The house was locked up, and soft halting steps approached her chamber. Banished, unable to move, she expected the horrible; but how did she gape when the door opened and at the light of the night lamp she recognized at first sight the honest Baptiste who looked deathly pale and quite disturbed. "For the sake of all the Saints", he began, "for the sake of all the Saints, tell me Lady Martiniere, what has happened? Oh, the fear! the fear! - I don't know what it was, but it forcefully drove me away from the wedding last night ! - And now I come into the street. Lady Martiniere, I think , is a light sleeper, she will certainly hear when I knock softly and decently at the front door, and let me in. Then a strong patrol approaches me, riders, foot soldiers, armed to the teeth, and stops me and does not want to let me go. But fortunately Desgrais is with them, the military police lieutenant, who knows me quite well; he says, as they hold the lantern under my nose: 'Hey, Baptiste, where do you com from at night? You have to stay in the house and keep it safe. It isn't safe here, we think we will make a good catch this very night." You won't imagine, Lady Martiniere, how these words fell upon my heart. And now I step on the doorstep and then a cloaked fellow rushes out of the house, a naked stiletto in his fist, and knocks me down - the house is open, the keys in the lock - tell me, what does that all mean?" The Martiniere, freed from her fear of death, told, how everything had been going on. Both of them, she and Baptiste, went into the hallway and found the candlestick on the floor where the strange man had thrown it down while fleeing. "It is only too obvious," Baptiste said, "that our mistress was to be robbed and even be murdered. The man knew, as you explain that you were alone with your mistress, nay, that she was still awake with her writing; surely it was one of the accursed scoundrels and villains who force their way into houses, cunningly exploring everything that is useful to them for carrying out their fiendish attacks. And the little box, Lady Martiniere, I think we throw into the Seine, where it is the deepest. Who can guarantee, that not some wicked fiend is going to attempt to our good mistress's life, that when opening the box she will not sink down dead, just like the old Marquis de Tournay, when he opened the letter which he had received from an unknown hand." Counseling for a long time, the faithful at last decided to tell the mistress everything the next morning and to hand over to her the mysterious box which, with due care, could be opened. Both of them, considering carefully every detail of the appearance of the suspicious stranger, thought, there might well be a special secret in it, which they were not allowed to judge over on their own, but would have to leave the revelation to their mistress.
unit 7
Mein Fräulein sollt und werdet Ihr jetzt nicht sprechen.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 9
– jetzt schert Euch aus dem Hause!"
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 12
"Laßt mich zu Euerm Fräulein, sage ich Euch", rief der Mensch nochmals.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 14
"Ha", schrie der Mensch auf, "Ihr habt recht, la Martiniere!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 16
"Jesus!"
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks ago
unit 18
"Die Marechaussee – die Marechaussee.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks ago
unit 19
Hilfe, Hilfe!"
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks ago
unit 20
schrie die Martiniere.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks ago
unit 21
"Entsetzliches Weib, du willst mein Verderben – nun ist alles aus, alles aus!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 22
– nimm!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks ago
unit 27
Das Haus wurde zugeschlossen, und leise unsichere Tritte nahten sich dem Gemach.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 30
Ach die Angst!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 31
die Angst!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 33
– Und nun komme ich in die Straße.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 37
Du mußt fein im Hause bleiben und es hüten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 38
unit 39
Ihr glaubt gar nicht, Frau Martiniere, wie mir diese Worte aufs Herz fielen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 41
Die Martiniere, von ihrer Todesangst befreit, erzählte, wie sich alles begeben.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago

Mademoiselle de Scuderi -2 - (http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/das-fraulein-von-scuderi-3084/1)

Sowie sie die Türe kaum geöffnet, drängte sich ungestüm die im Mantel gehüllte Gestalt hinein und rief, der Martiniere vorbeischreitend in den Flur, mit wilder Stimme: "Führt mich zu Euerm Fräulein!"
Erschrocken hob die Martiniere den Leuchter in die Höhe, und der Kerzenschimmer fiel in ein todbleiches, furchtbar entstelltes Jünglingsantlitz. Vor Schrecken hätte die Martiniere zu Boden sinken mögen, als nun der Mensch den Mantel auseinanderschlug und der blanke Griff eines Stiletts aus dem Brustlatz hervorragte. Es blitzte der Mensch sie an mit funkelnden Augen und rief noch wilder als zuvor: "Führt mich zu Euerm Fräulein, sage ich Euch!" Nun sah die Martiniere ihr Fräulein in der dringendsten Gefahr, alle Liebe zu der teuren Herrschaft, in der sie zugleich die fromme, treue Mutter ehrte, flammte stärker auf im Innern und erzeugte einen Mut, dessen sie wohl selbst sich nicht fähig geglaubt hätte. Sie warf die Türe ihres Gemachs, die sie offen gelassen, schnell zu, trat vor dieselbe und sprach stark und fest: "In der Tat, Euer tolles Betragen hier im Hause paßt schlecht zu Euern kläglichen Worten da draußen, die, wie ich nun wohl merke, mein Mitleiden sehr zu unrechter Zeit erweckt haben. Mein Fräulein sollt und werdet Ihr jetzt nicht sprechen. Habt Ihr nichts Böses im Sinn, dürft Ihr den Tag nicht scheuen, so kommt morgen wieder und bringt Eure Sache an! – jetzt schert Euch aus dem Hause!" Der Mensch stieß einen dumpfen Seufzer aus, blickte die Martiniere starr an mit entsetzlichem Blick und griff nach dem Stilett. Die Martiniere befahl im stillen ihre Seele dem Herrn, doch blieb sie standhaft und sah dem Menschen keck ins Auge, indem sie sich fester an die Türe des Gemachs drückte, durch welches der Mensch gehen mußte, um zu dem Fräulein zu gelangen. "Laßt mich zu Euerm Fräulein, sage ich Euch", rief der Mensch nochmals. "Tut, was Ihr wollt", erwiderte die Martiniere, "ich weiche nicht von diesem Platz, vollendet nur die böse Tat, die Ihr begonnen, auch Ihr werdet den schmachvollen Tod finden auf dem Greveplatz, wie Eure verruchten Spießgesellen." "Ha", schrie der Mensch auf, "Ihr habt recht, la Martiniere! ich sehe aus, ich bin bewaffnet wie ein verruchter Räuber und Mörder, aber meine Spießgesellen sind nicht gerichtet, sind nicht gerichtete – Und damit zog er, giftige Blicke schießend auf die zum Tode geängstete Frau, das Stilett heraus. "Jesus!" rief sie, den Todesstoß erwartend, aber in dem Augenblick ließ sich auf der Straße das Geklirr von Waffen, der Huftritt von Pferden hören. "Die Marechaussee – die Marechaussee. Hilfe, Hilfe!" schrie die Martiniere. "Entsetzliches Weib, du willst mein Verderben – nun ist alles aus, alles aus! – nimm! – nimm; gib das dem Fräulein heute noch – morgen, wenn du willst –" dies leise murmelnd, hatte der Mensch der Martiniere den Leuchter weggerissen, die Kerzen verlöscht und ihr ein Kästchen in die Hände gedrückt. "Um deiner Seligkeit willen, gib das Kästchen dem Fräulein", rief der Mensch und sprang zum Hause hinaus. Die Martiniere war zu Boden gesunken, mit Mühe stand sie auf und tappte sich in der Finsternis zurück in ihr Gemach, wo sie ganz erschöpft, keines Lautes mächtig, in den Lehnstuhl sank. Nun hörte sie die Schlüssel klirren, die sie im Schloß der Haustüre hatte stecken lassen. Das Haus wurde zugeschlossen, und leise unsichere Tritte nahten sich dem Gemach. Festgebannt, ohne Kraft sich zu regen, erwartete sie das Gräßliche; doch wie geschah ihr, als die Türe aufging und sie bei dem Scheine der Nachtlampe auf den ersten Blick den ehrlichen Baptiste erkannte; der sah leichenblaß aus und ganz verstört. "Um aller Heiligen willen", fing er an, "um aller Heiligen willen, sagt mir, Frau Martiniere, was ist geschehen? Ach die Angst! die Angst! – Ich weiß nicht, was es war, aber fortgetrieben hat es mich von der Hochzeit gestern abend mit Gewalt! – Und nun komme ich in die Straße. Frau Martiniere, denk ich, hat einen leisen Schlaf, die wird's wohl hören, wenn ich leise und säuberlich anpoche an die Haustüre, und mich hineinlassen. Da kommt mir eine starke Patrouille entgegen, Reuter, Fußvolk, bis an die Zähne bewaffnet, und hält mich an und will mich nicht fortlassen. Aber zum Glück ist Desgrais dabei, der Marechaussee-Leutnant, der mich recht gut kennt; der spricht, als sie mir die Laterne unter die Nase halten: 'Ei, Baptiste, wo kommst du her des Wegs in der Nacht? Du mußt fein im Hause bleiben und es hüten. Hier ist es nicht geheuer, wir denken noch in dieser Nacht einen guten Fang zu machen.' Ihr glaubt gar nicht, Frau Martiniere, wie mir diese Worte aufs Herz fielen. Und nun trete ich auf die Schwelle, und da stürzt ein verhüllter Mensch aus dem Hause, das blanke Stilett in der Faust, und rennt mich um und um – das Haus ist offen, die Schlüssel stecken im Schlosse – sagt, was hat das alles zu bedeuten?" Die Martiniere, von ihrer Todesangst befreit, erzählte, wie sich alles begeben. Beide, sie und Baptiste, gingen in den Hausflur, sie fanden den Leuchter auf dem Boden, wo der fremde Mensch ihn im Entfliehen hingeworfen. "Es ist nur zu gewiß", sprach Baptiste, "daß unser Fräulein beraubt und wohl gar ermordet werden sollte. Der Mensch wußte, wie Ihr erzählt, daß Ihr allein wart mit dem Fräulein, ja sogar, daß sie noch wachte bei ihren Schriften; gewiß war es einer von den verfluchten Gaunern und Spitzbuben, die bis ins Innere der Häuser dringen, alles listig auskundschaftend, was ihnen zur Ausführung ihrer teuflischen Anschläge dienlich. Und das kleine Kästchen, Frau Martiniere, das, denk ich, werfen wir in die Seine, wo sie am tiefsten ist. Wer steht uns dafür, daß nicht irgendein verruchter Unhold unserm guten Fräulein nach dem Leben trachtet, daß sie, das Kästchen öffnend, nicht tot niedersinkt, wie der alte Marquis von Tournay, als er den Brief aufmachte, den er von unbekannter Hand erhalten! –" Lange ratschlagend, beschlossen die Getreuen endlich, dem Fräulein am andern Morgen alles zu erzählen und ihr auch das geheimnisvolle Kästchen einzuhändigen, das ja mit gehöriger Vorsicht geöffnet werden könne. Beide, erwägten sie genau jeden Umstand der Erscheinung des verdächtigen Fremden, meinten, daß wohl ein besonderes Geheimnis im Spiele sein könne, über das sie eigenmächtig nicht schalten dürften, sondern die Enthüllung ihrer Herrschaft überlassen müßten.