de-en  Der glückliche Prinz von Oscar Wilde
High above the city stood the statue of the happy prince on a slender column. He was gilded over and over again with thin leaves of fine gold, he had two shimmering sapphires for his eyes and a large red ruby glowed at the pommel of his sword.

The whole world admired him very much. "He is as beautiful as a weathercock," said a councillor who sought to gain the reputation of an art connoisseur. "Only not quite so useful," he added, fearing that people might consider him impractical, and he was by no means.

"Why can't you be like the happy prince?" asked a sensible mother of her little boy who was crying for the moon. "It never, ever enters the happy prince's mind to cry about anything." "I'm glad that there is someone in this world who is completely happy," a disappointed man whispered to himself as he looked up at the wonderful statue.

"He looks like the complete embodiment of an angel," said the orphans as they came out of the cathedral in their bright scarlet coats and clean white aprons.

"How do you know?" asked the mathematics teacher. "You've never seen one." "Oh yes! In our dreams, answered the children, and the mathematics teacher frowned and made a very austere face, for he could not stand children dreaming.

One night a little swallow flew over the city, an adolescent swallow. His companions had already migrated to Egypt six weeks ago, but he had stayed behind because he was in love with the prettiest of all the reeds. He had met his beauty in early spring, when he flew along the river behind a plump yellow butterfly and had been so bewitched by her tender waist that he had interrupted his flight to chat with her.

"Shall I love you?" said the adolescent swallow, who liked to get to the point immediately, and the beautiful one made a deep bow to him. So he flew circles around her, touching the water lightly with his wings, and making silver ripples. ... This was his courtship, and it lasted all through the summer.

"That is a ridiculous love affair," the other swallows twittered, "she has no money and far too many relatives," and indeed the river was full of reeds. Then, when autumn came, all the swallows flew away.

Now that they were gone, the little bird felt lonely and began to become weary of his lady. "I can't even talk with her," he said, "and it almost seems to me that she's coquettish, because she flirts with the wind all the time. And really, whenever the wind blew, she greeted it with the most graceful bows. "I admit she's domestic," the bird continued, "but I love to travel, and therefore my wife should love it too." "He finally asked her, "Do you want to come with me? But she just shook her head, she was rooted too firmly in her home. "You played your game with me!" he screamed. "I'm leaving for the pyramids. Farewell!" And he flew away.

He flew all day, and at dusk he arrived in the city. "Where shall I descend?" he said to himself. "Hopefully they have made their preparations here." Then he saw the statue on the tall column.

"I want to descend there," he shouted, "the location is beautiful, and there's plenty of fresh air up there. Thus he alighted just between the feet of the happy prince.

"I have a golden bedroom," said the little bird dreamily to himself as he looked around, getting ready to go to sleep; but as he was about to put his head under his wing, a large drop of water fell on him. "How strange," he shouted, "not a single cloud is in the sky, the stars shine clear and bright, and yet it is raining. The climate in northern Europe is really dreadful. The reed raved about rain, but that was nothing but egoism." Then a second drop fell.

"What use is a statue if it can't even stop the rain?" he said, "I have to look around for a solid chimney top," and he decided to fly on.

But before he had spread out his wings, a third drop fell, and he looked up and saw ... Ah, what did he see?

The eyes of the happy prince were full of tears, and tears were running down his golden cheeks. His face was so beautiful in the moonlight that the little swallow was filled with pity.

"Who are you?" he said.

"I am the happy prince. "Why are you weeping then?" asked the swallow, "I got all wet from it." "When I was alive and had a human heart," answered the statue, "I did not know what tears were, for I lived in the castle without worries, where no sorrow was allowed to enter. In the daytime I played with my playmates in the garden, and in the evening I led the dance in the great hall. Round the garden was a very lofty wall , but I never cared to ask what lay beyond it, everything around me was so beautiful. The courtiers called me the happy prince, and happy indeed I was, if pleasure means happiness. As I lived, so I died. And now that I am dead, they have set me up here so high that I can see all the ugliness and all the misery of my city, and even if I have a leaden heart - how could I not cry?" "What, it's not made of solid gold?" the swallow asked himself in silence. He was too polite to make any personal remarks out loud.

"Far away from here", the statue continued with a soft, melodic voice, "far away from here in a small lane stands a humble house. One of the windows is open, and through this window I can see a woman sitting at a table. Her face is lean and haggard, and she has coarse, red hands completely pricked by the needle, for she is a seamstress. She embroiders passion flowers on a satin gown that she wants to wear to the next court ball to be most charming among the queen's ladies of honor. In a bed in the corner of the chamber her little boy is lying ill. He has a temperature and wants oranges so much. But his mother cannot give him anything but water from the river, and so he weeps. Swallow, swallow, little swallow, won't you take the ruby out of my sword handle? My feet are tied to this pedestal, and I cannot go down". "I am expected in Egypt," said the swallow. "My friends fly up and down the Nile and chat with the magnificent lotus flowers. Soon they will be going sleep in the tomb of the great king. ... The king himself lies down there in his colorfully painted sarcophagus. He is wrapped in a yellow bed linen and embalmed with fragrances. A chain of pale green jade winds around his neck, and his hands are like dried up leaves. "Swallow, swallow, little swallow," said the prince, "won't you stay with me for one night and be my messenger? The boy is languishing, and the mother is so worried." "Actually, I can't stand boys at all," replied the swallow. "On the river where I lived last summer there were two naughty boys, the miller's sons; they kept throwing stones at me. Of course, they never hit me, we swallows fly far too well for that, and moreover I come from a family which is famous for its swiftness; but it was still a sign of disrespect." However, the happy prince looked so sad that the little swallow was lamenting. "It's very cold here," the swallow said, "but I want to stay with you for one night and be your messenger." "Thank you, little swallow," said the prince.

So the swallow pecked out the great ruby from the prince's sword, and flew away with it in his beak over the roofs of the city.

He passed by the cathedral tower where the white marble angels looked down. He passed the castle and heard the noise of the ball. A beautiful girl came out on the balcony with her admirer. "How wonderful the stars are," he said to her, "and how wonderful is the power of love! "Hopefully my dress will be ready in time for the court ball," she replied. "I have ordered that passion flowers be embroidered on it; but the seamstresses are so lazy." The swallow flew over the river and saw the lanterns hanging from the masts of the ships. He flew over the ghetto and saw the old Jews bargaining with each other and weighing out money on copper scales. Finally he came to the humble little house and looked in. The boy was feverishly tossing and turning in bed, and his mother had fallen asleep, she was so tired. Through the window the swallow hopped in and laid the large ruby on the table beside the woman's thimble. Then he flew around the bed with soft flaps of his wings, and his wings fanned the boy's forehead. "How cool I feel," said the boy, "I think I am going to be better." And he sank into a refreshing slumber.

Then the swallow flew back to the happy prince and told him what he had done. "It's strange," the swallow remarked, "but I'm not cold anymore, even though it's so cold. "That happens because you did a good deed," said the prince. And the little swallow began to think about it, and then he fell asleep. Thinking always made him sleepy.

At daybreak he flew down to the river and took a bath. "What a noteworthy phenomenon," said the ornithology professor who just walked across the bridge. "A swallow in winter!" And he wrote a long article about this topic for the local newspaper. Everyone quoted him, he was full of so many words that no one understood.

"Tonight I'm going to Egypt," said the little bird, and he felt very excited at the prospect. He visited all the monuments and important buildings of the town and sat for a long time on the top of the church steeple. Wherever he went, the sparrows everywhere shouted to each other chirping: "What a distinguished stranger!" So the swallow had an excellent conversation.

When the moon rose, it flew back to the happy prince. Is there anything I can do for you in Egypt?" he shouted. "I'm leaving now." "Swallow, swallow, little swallow," said the prince, "won't you stay with me one more night? "I am expected in Egypt," replied the swallow. "Tomorrow my friends will fly up to the second cataract The hippopotamus rests there between the rushes, and the god Memnon sits on a large granite throne sits the god Memmon. All night long he looks up at the stars, and when the morning star rises, he exclaims a single shout of jubilation and then remains silent again. At noon the yellow lions come down to the edge of the shore to drink. They have eyes like green beryls and their roar is more powerful than the roar of the cataract. "Swallow, swallow, little swallow," said the prince, "far away from here, at the end of the city, I see a young man in an attic. He is leaning over a writing desk covered with papers and a bunch of withered violets is standing next to him in a glass of water. His hair is brown and curly, and he has large dreamy eyes, and his lips are red as a pomegranate. He is trying to finish a play for the director of the theatre, but he is too cold to write any more. No fire is burning in his fireplace and hunger has weakened him." "I want to stay that one night with you," said the swallow, who really had a good heart. "ShalI bring him a ruby, too?" "Oh no, I don't have a ruby anymore," said the prince, "my eyes are all that I have left. They are made of rare sapphires which were brought out of India a thousand years ago. Peck one of them out and take it to him. ... He will take the precious stone to the goldsmith to buy food and firewood and finish his piece." "Dear Prince," said the swallow, "I can't do that," and began to cry.

"Swallow, swallow, little swallow," said the prince, "do what I am asking you." So the prince's swallow tore one eye out and flew away to the student's attic. It was easy enough to get in, as there was a hole in the roof. Through this hole he flew and got into the chamber. The young man had his head buried in his hands, so he didn't hear the flutter of the bird's wings, and when he looked up, he found the beautiful sapphire lying on the withered violet.

"They are beginning to appreciate me," he cried, "certainly, this must come from a great admirer. Now I can finish my play," and he looked quite happy.

The next day the swallow flew down to the port. She sat on the mast of a huge ship and watched as the sailors were lifting heavy crates on ropes from the ship's hold. "Heave a-hoy! a-hoy!" they shouted at every box they picked up. "I'm traveling to Egypt" called the swallow; but no one noticed, and when the moon rose, it flew back to the happy prince.

"I'm coming to bid you good-bye," he cried.

"Swallow, swallow, little swallow," said the prince, "won't you stay one more night with me? "It's winter," replied the swallow, "and the icy snow will soon be here. In Egypt the sun is shining warmly on the green palm trees, and the crocodiles lie in the mud and look lazily around them. My companions are building a nest in the temple of Baalbek, and the white and pink doves watch them, and one is cooing affectionately to the other. Dear Prince, I must say goodbye, but I will never forget you, and next spring I will bring you two beautiful gems instead of the ones you've given away.

The ruby shall be redder than a red rose, and the sapphire as blue as the wide sea." "In the square below," said the happy prince, "a little girl is standing and selling matches. She dropped her matchsticks in the gutter, and they're all spoiled.

Her father will beat her if she doesn't bring home any money, and that's why she's crying. She doesn't have stockings nor shoes, and her little head is bare. Tear out my other eye and give it to her, and her father will not beat her." "I want to stay with you this one night," said the swallow, "but I cannot tear out your eye. Then you'd be completely blind." "Swallow, swallow, little swallow," said the prince, "do what I ask of you. Then the swallow tore the prince's other eye out and thrust down to the square with it. He buzzed past the match girl and let the jewel slide into her hand. "What a lovely bit of glass!" cried the little girl; and she ran home, laughing.

Then the swallow came back to the prince. "You're blind now," the swallow said, "thus I will stay with you always." "No, little swallow," said the poor prince, "you must travel to Egypt." "I will always stay with you," said the swallow and fell asleep at the prince's feet.

All the next day he sat on the prince's shoulder and told him strange stories of what he had seen in strange lands. She told him about the red ibises that stand in long rows on the banks of the Nile, and catch goldfish with their beaks; of the sphinx who is as old as the world itself and lives in the desert and knows everything; about the merchants who walk slowly by the side of their camels, and carry rosaries of amber in their hands; from the king of the mountains of the moon who is black as ebony and adores a huge crystal; from the great green snake who sleeps in a palm tree and has twenty priests around to serve her and feed her with honey cakes; and from the pygmies who sail across a great lake on flat broad leaves and are always at war with the butterflies.

"Dear little swallow," said the prince, "you tell me about marvellous things, but more wondrous than anything in the world is the suffering of men. No wonder is as deep as the wounds of misery. Fly over my city, little swallow, and tell me what you see there." So the little swallow flew over the big city and saw how well off the rich in their beautiful houses could be, whereas the beggars were sitting outside at the gates. He flew into dark alleys and saw the white faces of starving children looking unhappy in the gloomy streets. ... Under one of the bridge's arches two little boys were lying, one nestled in the other arms to warm themselves. ... "We're so hungry!" they said. "You mustn't lie here!" shouted the guard, and they went out into the rain.

Then the swallow flew back and told the prince what she had seen.

"I am covered with fine gold," said the prince, "which you are to lift off, leaf by leaf, and give to my poor ones; the living think that gold can make them happy." Leaf after leaf of fine gold the swallow pecked off, until the happy prince looked completely dull and grey. Leaf upon leaf of fine gold the swallow brought to the poor, and the cheeks of the children blossomed, and they laughed and played their games in the streets. "Now we have bread!" they cried.

Then came the snow, and after the snow came the frost. The streets looked as if they were forged of silver, so brightly they glittered; long icicles, like crystal daggers, hung from the roofs of houses, the whole world was walking along in furs, and the little boys wore red wool caps and skated on the ice.

The poor little swallow froze and froze more and more, but she didn't want to leave the prince, she loved him too much. She pecked at crumbs at the baker's door when the baker wasn't looking and tried to warm herself by flapping her wings.

But at last he realized that he had to die. He had just enough strength to swing once more on the prince's shoulder. "Farewell, dear prince," she said quietly, "may I kiss your hand? "I'm glad you're finally going to Egypt, little swallow," said the prince, "you've stayed here far too long; but you must kiss me on the lips, because I love you." "I'm not going to travel to Egypt," said the swallow, "I'm traveling to the house of death. Death is the brother of sleep, isn't it?" And he kissed the happy prince on his lips and fell dead at his feet.

At that moment, a strange crackling sounded from inside the statue, as if something had broken. And truly, the leaden heart in the middle of it had arisen a second time. ... It was a grim cold night.

Early the next morning the mayor walked down the square with the councillors. As they passed the column, he looked up at the statue. "Oh, dear! How miserable the happy prince looks," he said. The councilors, who always agreed with the mayor, shouted, "Certainly, how pathetic!" And they went up to see the damage up close.

"The ruby has fallen out of his sword, his eyes are no longer there, and he is no longer golden," said the mayor. "He virtually looks no better than a beggar." "Hardly better than a beggar," said the councillors. "And here truly lies a dead bird at his feet!" continued the mayor. "We really must issue a decree prohibiting birds from dying here." And the town clerk made a note of it. Therefore, the statue of the happy prince was taken down. "Since it is no longer beautiful, it is no longer useful," said the art professor of the university.

Then they melted the statue down in a furnace, and the mayor held a meeting with the city council to decide what to do with the metal. "We must of course have a new statue," he said, "and that shall be my own statue." "My own," said each of the councillors, and they quarreled and argued. The last time I heard from them, they were still fighting.

"But how strange!" said the foreman at the smelter. "This broken heart will not melt in the furnace. We have to throw it away." So they threw it on a rubbish heap upon which the dead swallow lay. "Bring me the two most precious things of this city," God said to one of his angels; and the angel brought him the leaden heart and the dead bird.

"You have chosen rightly," God said, "for in my paradise garden the little bird shall sing on and on, and in my golden city the happy prince shall glorify me."
unit 1
Hoch über der Stadt stand auf einer schlanken Säule die Statue des glücklichen Prinzen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 3
Alle Welt bewunderte ihn sehr.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 9
»Woher wollt ihr das wissen?« fragte der Rechenlehrer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 10
»Ihr habt ja nie einen gesehen.« »O doch!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 12
Eines Nachts nun flog eine kleine Schwalbe über die Stadt, ein Schwalbenjüngling.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 17
Auf solche Art warb er, und es ging so den ganzen Sommer lang.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 19
Dann, als der Herbst kam, flogen die Schwalben alle davon.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 23
»Du hast dein Spiel mit mir getrieben!« schrie er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 24
»Ich mache mich davon nach den Pyramiden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 25
Leb wohl!« Und er flog von dannen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 26
Den ganzen Tag flog er, und im Abenddämmern kam er in der Stadt an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 27
»Wo soll ich absteigen?« sagte er zu sich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 32
Das Klima im nördlichen Europa ist wirklich schauderhaft.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 37
Sein Antlitz war so schön im Mondlicht, daß Mitleid die kleine Schwalbe erfüllte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 38
»Wer bist du?« fragte sie.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 43
So lebte ich, so starb ich.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 45
Sie war zu höflich, um irgendwelche anzüglichen Bemerkungen laut auszusprechen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 50
In einer Ecke der Kammer liegt ihr kleiner Junge krank im Bett.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 51
Er fiebert und möchte so gerne Orangen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 56
Bald werden sie im Grabmal des großen Königs schlafen gehen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 57
Der König selbst liegt dort unten in seinem buntbemalten Sarge.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 58
Er ist in ein gelbes Leintuch gewickelt und mit Wohlgerüchen einbalsamiert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 65
unit 66
Sie kam am Schloß vorüber und hörte den Lärm des Balles.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 67
Ein schönes Mädchen trat mit seinem Anbeter auf den Altan hinaus.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 71
Endlich kam sie zu dem armen Häuschen und blickte hinein.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 78
Und die kleine Schwalbe begann darüber nachzudenken, und dann schlief sie ein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 79
Denken machte sie immer schläfrig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 80
Als es tagte, flog sie hinab zum Fluß und nahm ein Bad.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 83
Jedermann zitierte ihn, er war voll so vieler Wörter, die niemand verstand.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 87
Als der Mond aufging, flog sie zurück zu dem glücklichen Prinzen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 88
»Soll ich in Ägypten etwas für dich ausrichten?« rief sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 90
»Morgen fliegen meine Freunde hinauf zum zweiten Katarakt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 93
Zu Mittag kommen die gelben Löwen herab zum Ufersaum, um zu trinken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 101
Reiß eines von ihnen aus und trag es zu ihm hin.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 104
Es war leicht genug, hineinzugelangen, denn das Dach hatte ein Loch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 105
Da hindurch schoß sie und kam in die Kammer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 108
Nun kann ich mein Stück vollenden«, und er sah ganz glücklich aus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 109
Am nächsten Tage flog die Schwalbe hinunter zum Hafen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 111
»Hievt, a-hoi!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 112
a-hoi!« schrien sie bei jeder Kiste, die sie aufhievten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 114
»Ich bin gekommen, dir Lebewohl zu sagen«, rief sie.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 120
Sie hat ihre Hölzchen in die Gosse fallen lassen, und sie sind ganz verdorben.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 121
unit 122
Sie hat nicht Strümpfe noch Schuhe, und ihr Köpfchen ist bloß.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 125
unit 126
unit 127
Dann kam die Schwalbe zurück zu dem Prinzen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 132
Kein Wunder ist so tief wie die Wunden des Elends.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 136
»Wir haben solchen Hunger!« sagten sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 138
Da flog die Schwalbe zurück und erzählte dem Prinzen, was sie gesehen hatte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 141
»Nun haben wir Brot!« riefen sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 142
Dann kam der Schnee, und nach dem Schnee kam der Frost.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 146
Endlich aber erkannte sie, daß sie sterben müsse.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 147
unit 151
Und wirklich, das bleierne Herz war mitten entzweigesprungen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 152
Es war ja auch eine grimmig kalte Nacht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 154
Als sie an der Säule vorbeikamen, blickte er hinauf zu dem Standbild.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 155
»Ach, du liebe Zeit!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 156
Wie armselig der glückliche Prinz aussieht!« sagte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 162
Also wurde das Standbild des glücklichen Prinzen herabgeholt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 166
Als ich zuletzt von ihnen hörte, stritten sie sich noch immer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 167
»Ist das aber merkwürdig!« sagte der Werkmeister in der Schmelzhütte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 168
»Dieses zerbrochene Herz will im Ofen nicht schmelzen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 10  1 month, 1 week ago

Hoch über der Stadt stand auf einer schlanken Säule die Statue des glücklichen Prinzen. Er war über und über mit dünnen Blättern feinen Goldes vergoldet, er hatte zwei schimmernde Saphire als Augen, und an seinem Schwertknauf glühte ein großer roter Rubin.

Alle Welt bewunderte ihn sehr. »Er ist so schön wie ein Wetterhahn«, meinte ein Ratsherr, der den Ruf eines Kunstkenners zu erlangen trachtete. »Nur nicht ganz so nützlich«, setzte er hinzu, denn er fürchtete, die Leute könnten ihn für unpraktisch halten, und das war er keineswegs.

»Warum kannst du nicht sein wie der glückliche Prinz?« fragte eine empfindsame Mutter ihren kleinen Jungen, der weinend nach dem Mond verlangte. »Dem glücklichen Prinzen fällt's nun und nimmer ein, nach irgend etwas zu weinen.«

»Ich bin froh, daß es in dieser Welt doch Einen gibt, der vollkommen glücklich ist«, flüsterte ein Enttäuschter vor sich hin, als er zu dem wundervollen Standbild emporschaute.

»Er sieht ganz wie ein Engel aus«, sagten die Waisenkinder, wenn sie in ihren hellen scharlachroten Mänteln und den sauberen weißen Schürzchen aus der Kathedrale kamen.

»Woher wollt ihr das wissen?« fragte der Rechenlehrer. »Ihr habt ja nie einen gesehen.«

»O doch! In unseren Träumen«, antworteten die Kinder; und der Rechenlehrer runzelte die Stirn und machte ein sehr strenges Gesicht, denn er konnte es gar nicht leiden, daß Kinder träumten.

Eines Nachts nun flog eine kleine Schwalbe über die Stadt, ein Schwalbenjüngling. Seine Gefährten waren schon vor sechs Wochen nach Ägypten gezogen, er aber hatte gesäumt, denn er war in das hübscheste aller Schilfrohre verliebt. Er hatte seine Schöne im jungen Frühling kennengelernt, als er hinter einem dicken gelben Falter her den Fluß entlangflog, und war von ihrer zarten Taille so betört gewesen, daß er in seinem Fluge eingehalten hatte, um mit ihr zu plaudern.

»Soll ich dich lieben?« fragte der Schwalbenjüngling, der gern ohne viel Umschweife zur Hauptsache kam, und die Schöne neigte sich tief vor ihm. Da flog und kreiste er um sie her und streifte das Wasser leicht mit seinen Flügeln, daß es sich silbern kräuselte. Auf solche Art warb er, und es ging so den ganzen Sommer lang.

»Das ist eine lächerliche Liebschaft«, zwitscherten die anderen Schwalben, »sie hat kein Geld und viel zuviel Verwandte« – und in der Tat war der Fluß ganz voller Röhricht. Dann, als der Herbst kam, flogen die Schwalben alle davon.

Da sie nun fort waren, fühlte der kleine Vogel sich einsam und fing an, seiner Dame überdrüssig zu werden. »Man kann sich gar nicht mit ihr unterhalten«, sagte er, »und mir scheint fast, sie ist kokett, denn allzeit flirtet sie mit dem Wind.« Und wirklich, wann immer der Wind wehte, grüßte sie ihn mit den anmutvollsten Verneigungen. »Ich gebe zu, sie ist häuslich«, fuhr der Vogel fort, »aber ich liebe das Reisen, und folglich sollte meine Frau es auch lieben.«

»Willst du mit mir kommen?« fragte er sie schließlich; aber sie schüttelte nur den Kopf, sie wurzelte allzu fest in ihrem Heim. »Du hast dein Spiel mit mir getrieben!« schrie er. »Ich mache mich davon nach den Pyramiden. Leb wohl!« Und er flog von dannen.

Den ganzen Tag flog er, und im Abenddämmern kam er in der Stadt an. »Wo soll ich absteigen?« sagte er zu sich. »Hoffentlich haben sie hier ihre Zurüstungen getroffen.«

Dann sah er das Standbild auf der hohen Säule.

»Dort will ich absteigen«, rief er, »die Lage ist schön, und frische Luft gibt‘s da oben genug.« Damit ließ er sich just zwischen den Füßen des glücklichen Prinzen nieder.

»Ich habe ein goldenes Schlafzimmer«, sagte der kleine Vogel träumerisch zu sich selber, als er um sich blickte, und machte sich zum Schlafengehen bereit; aber da er eben den Kopf unter den Flügel stecken wollte, fiel ein großer Tropfen Wasser auf ihn herab. »Wie sonderbar!« rief er, »nicht ein einziges Wölkchen steht am Himmel, die Sterne scheinen klar und hell, und dabei regnet es. Das Klima im nördlichen Europa ist wirklich schauderhaft. Das Schilfrohr schwärmte zwar für Regen, aber das war nichts als Egoismus.«

Da fiel ein zweiter Tropfen.

»Wozu nützt ein Standbild, wenn es nicht einmal den Regen abhalten kann?« sagte er, »ich muß mich nach einem soliden Schornsteinaufsatz umsehen «, und er beschloß weiterzufliegen.

Doch ehe er seine Flügel ausgebreitet hatte, fiel ein dritter Tropfen, und er blickte auf und sah ... Ah, was sah er?

Die Augen des glücklichen Prinzen waren voll Tränen, und Tränen strömten ihm über die goldenen Wangen. Sein Antlitz war so schön im Mondlicht, daß Mitleid die kleine Schwalbe erfüllte.

»Wer bist du?« fragte sie.

»Ich bin der glückliche Prinz.«

»Warum weinst du dann?« fragte die Schwalbe, »ich bin davon ganz naß geworden.«

»Als ich lebte und ein Menschenherz besaß«, erwiderte das Standbild, »wußte ich nicht, was Tränen sind, denn ich lebte im Schloß Sorgenlos, das kein Leid betreten darf. Am Tage spielte ich mit meinen Gespielen im Garten, und des Abends führte ich den Tanz im großen Saale an. Rings um den Garten lief eine sehr hohe Mauer; aber nie kam mir die Frage, was dahinter sein möge, denn alles um mich her war so schön. Die Herren vom Hofe nannten mich den glücklichen Prinzen, glücklich war ich fürwahr, wofern Freude Glück bedeutet. So lebte ich, so starb ich. Und nun, da ich tot bin, haben sie mich in solche Höhe hier heraufgestellt, daß ich alles sehen kann, was häßlich, alles, was jammervoll ist in meiner Stadt, und wenn ich auch ein bleiernes Herz habe – wie sollte ich nicht weinen?«

»Was, er ist nicht aus massivem Gold?« fragte sich die Schwalbe im stillen. Sie war zu höflich, um irgendwelche anzüglichen Bemerkungen laut auszusprechen.

»Weit entfernt von hier«, fuhr das Standbild mit leiser, melodischer Stimme fort, »weit entfernt von hier in einer kleinen Gasse steht ein ärmliches Haus. Eins der Fenster ist offen, und durch dieses Fenster kann ich eine Frau an einem Tische sitzen sehen. Ihr Gesicht ist mager und verhärmt, rauh und rot sind ihre Hände und ganz von der Nadel zerstochen, denn sie ist eine Näherin. Sie stickt Passionsblumen auf ein Atlaskleid, das die reizendste unter den Ehrendamen der Königin beim nächsten Hofball tragen will. In einer Ecke der Kammer liegt ihr kleiner Junge krank im Bett. Er fiebert und möchte so gerne Orangen. Seine Mutter aber hat nichts ihm zu geben als Wasser aus dem Fluß, und deshalb weint er. Schwalbe, Schwalbe, kleine Schwalbe, willst du ihr nicht den Rubin aus meinem Schwertknauf bringen? Meine Füße sind an dies Postament gefesselt, und ich kann nicht hinab.«

»Ich werde in Ägypten erwartet«, sagte die Schwalbe. »Meine Freunde fliegen den Nil auf und nieder und plaudern mit den prangenden Lotosblumen. Bald werden sie im Grabmal des großen Königs schlafen gehen. Der König selbst liegt dort unten in seinem buntbemalten Sarge. Er ist in ein gelbes Leintuch gewickelt und mit Wohlgerüchen einbalsamiert. Um seinen Nacken schlingt sich eine Kette von blaßgrüner Jade, und seine Hände sind wie welkes Laub.«

»Schwalbe, Schwalbe, kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der Prinz, »willst du nicht eine Nacht lang bei mir bleiben und mein Bote sein? Der Knabe verschmachtet, und der Mutter ist so bang.«

»Ich kann Jungen eigentlich gar nicht leiden«, entgegnete die Schwalbe. »An dem Flusse, wo ich vorigen Sommer wohnte, waren zwei ungezogene Jungen, die Müllerssöhne; die warfen immerfort mit Steinen nach mir. Sie haben mich natürlich nie getroffen, wir Schwalben fliegen dafür viel zu gut, und überdies stamme ich aus einer Familie, die wegen ihrer Hurtigkeit berühmt ist; es war aber doch ein Zeichen von Nichtachtung.« Aber der glückliche Prinz sah so traurig aus, daß es die kleine Schwalbe jammerte. »Es ist sehr kalt hier«, sagte sie, »doch ich will eine Nacht lang bei dir bleiben und dein Bote sein.«

»Danke, kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der Prinz.

Also pickte die Schwalbe den großen Rubin aus des Prinzen Schwert, und den Edelstein im Schnabel, flog sie davon, über die Dächer der Stadt.

Sie kam am Turm der Kathedrale vorüber, von dem die weißen Marmorengel niederschauten. Sie kam am Schloß vorüber und hörte den Lärm des Balles. Ein schönes Mädchen trat mit seinem Anbeter auf den Altan hinaus. »Wie wunderreich die Sterne sind«, sagte er zu ihr, »und wie wunderreich ist die Macht der Liebe!«

»Hoffentlich wird mein Kleid rechtzeitig für den Hofball fertig«, antwortete sie. »Ich habe Auftrag gegeben, daß Passionsblumen daraufgestickt werden; aber die Näherinnen sind so faul.«

Die Schwalbe flog über den Fluß und sah die Laternen an den Masten der Schiffe hängen. Sie flog über das Getto und sah die alten Juden miteinander handeln und Geld auf kupfernen Waagschalen wägen. Endlich kam sie zu dem armen Häuschen und blickte hinein. Der Knabe warf sich fieberheiß im Bette hin und her, und die Mutter war eingeschlafen, sie war so müde. Durchs Fenster hinein hüpfte die Schwalbe und legte den großen Rubin auf den Tisch, neben den Fingerhut der Schlafenden. Dann umflog sie mit weichen Flügelschlägen das Bett, und ihre Schwingen fächelten des Knaben Stirn. »Wie kühl mir ist«, sagte der Knabe, »ich glaube, nun werde ich gesund.« Und er sank in einen erquickenden Schlummer.

Darauf flog die Schwalbe zurück zu dem glücklichen Prinzen und erzählte ihm, was sie getan hatte. »Es ist sonderbar«, bemerkte sie, »aber mich friert jetzt gar nicht mehr, obwohl es so kalt ist.«

»Das kommt, weil du eine gute Tat getan hast«, sagte der Prinz. Und die kleine Schwalbe begann darüber nachzudenken, und dann schlief sie ein. Denken machte sie immer schläfrig.

Als es tagte, flog sie hinab zum Fluß und nahm ein Bad. »Welch bemerkenswertes Phänomen!« sagte der Professor der Ornithologie, der eben über die Brücke ging. »Eine Schwalbe im Winter!« Und er schrieb über diesen Gegenstand einen langen Artikel für die Lokalzeitung. Jedermann zitierte ihn, er war voll so vieler Wörter, die niemand verstand.

»Heute abend reise ich nach Ägypten«, sagte der kleine Vogel, und er fühlte sich ganz angeregt von dieser Aussicht. Er besuchte alle Denkmäler und bedeutenden Bauten der Stadt und saß lange auf der Kirchturmspitze. Wo er auch hinkam, überall riefen die Spatzen zwitschernd einander zu: »Was für ein vornehmer Fremder!« So unterhielt sich die Schwalbe ganz ausgezeichnet.

Als der Mond aufging, flog sie zurück zu dem glücklichen Prinzen. »Soll ich in Ägypten etwas für dich ausrichten?« rief sie. »Ich breche jetzt auf.«

»Schwalbe, Schwalbe, kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der Prinz, »willst du nicht diese eine Nacht noch bei mir bleiben?«

»Ich werde in Ägypten erwartet«, antwortete die Schwalbe. »Morgen fliegen meine Freunde hinauf zum zweiten Katarakt. Das Nilpferd ruht dort zwischen den Binsen, und auf einem großen granitenen Throne sitzt der Gott Memnon. Die ganze Nacht hindurch schaut er nach den Sternen, und wenn das Morgengestirn aufgeht, stößt er einen einzigen tönenden Jubelschrei aus und schweigt dann wieder still. Zu Mittag kommen die gelben Löwen herab zum Ufersaum, um zu trinken. Sie haben Augen gleich grünen Beryllen, und ihr Gebrüll ist mächtiger als das Brüllen des Katarakts.«

»Schwalbe, Schwalbe, kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der Prinz, »weit entfernt von hier, am Ende der Stadt, sehe ich einen jungen Mann in einer Dachkammer. Er beugt sich über ein Schreibpult, das mit Papieren bedeckt ist, und ein Bund verdorrter Veilchen steht neben ihm in einem Wasserglas. Sein Haar ist braun und gelockt, und er hat große verträumte Augen, und seine Lippen sind wie ein Granatapfel rot. Er müht sich, ein Stück für den Theaterdirektor zu vollenden, aber er friert so sehr, daß er nicht weiterschreiben kann. Kein Feuer brennt in seinem Kamin, und der Hunger hat ihn entkräftet.«

»Ich will diese eine Nacht noch bei dir bleiben«, sagte die Schwalbe, die wirklich ein gutes Herz hatte. »Soll ich ihm auch einen Rubin bringen?«

»Ach nein, ich habe keinen Rubin mehr«, sagte der Prinz, »meine Augen sind alles, was mir geblieben ist. Sie sind aus köstlichen Saphiren gemacht, die man vor tausend Jahren aus Indien hergebracht hat. Reiß eines von ihnen aus und trag es zu ihm hin. Er wird den Edelstein zum Goldschmied bringen und Nahrung und Feuerholz kaufen und sein Stück vollenden.«

»Lieber Prinz«, sagte die Schwalbe, »das kann ich nicht.« Und sie begann zu weinen.

»Schwalbe, Schwalbe, kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der Prinz, »tu, wie ich dich heiße.«

Also riß die Schwalbe des Prinzen eines Auge aus und flog fort zur Dachkammer des Studenten. Es war leicht genug, hineinzugelangen, denn das Dach hatte ein Loch. Da hindurch schoß sie und kam in die Kammer. Der junge Mann hatte den Kopf in den Händen vergraben; so hörte er das Flattern der Vogelschwingen nicht, und als er aufsah, fand er den schönen Saphir, der auf den verdorrten Veilchen lag.

»Man beginnt mich anzuerkennen«, rief er, »dies hier kommt gewiß von einem großen Bewunderer. Nun kann ich mein Stück vollenden«, und er sah ganz glücklich aus.

Am nächsten Tage flog die Schwalbe hinunter zum Hafen. Sie saß auf dem Mast eines gewaltigen Schiffes und sah zu, wie die Matrosen schwere Kisten an Tauen aus dem Schiffsleib hochwanden. »Hievt, a-hoi! a-hoi!« schrien sie bei jeder Kiste, die sie aufhievten. »Ich reise nach Ägypten!« rief die Schwalbe; aber niemand beachtete sie, und als der Mond aufging, flog sie zurück zu dem glücklichen Prinzen.

»Ich bin gekommen, dir Lebewohl zu sagen«, rief sie.

»Schwalbe, Schwalbe, kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der Prinz, »willst du nicht diese eine Nacht noch bei mir bleiben?«

»Es ist Winter«, antwortete die Schwalbe, »und der eisige Schnee wird bald dasein. In Ägypten scheint die Sonne warm auf die grünen Palmenbäume, und die Krokodile liegen im Schlamm und blicken träge um sich. Meine Gefährten bauen ein Nest im Tempel von Baalbek, und die weiß- und rosenfarbenen Tauben sehen ihnen zu, und eine gurrt der andern Zärtlichkeiten. Lieber Prinz, ich muß Abschied nehmen, aber ich will dich nie vergessen, und im nächsten Frühling bringe ich dir zwei schöne Edelsteine statt derer, die du weggegeben hast.

Der Rubin soll röter sein als eine rote Rose, und der Saphir so blau wie die weite See.«

»Auf dem Platze unten«, sagte der glückliche Prinz, »steht ein kleines Mädchen und verkauft Streichhölzer. Sie hat ihre Hölzchen in die Gosse fallen lassen, und sie sind ganz verdorben.

Ihr Vater wird sie schlagen, wenn sie kein Geld nach Hause bringt, und darum weint sie. Sie hat nicht Strümpfe noch Schuhe, und ihr Köpfchen ist bloß. Reiß mein anderes Auge aus und gib es ihr, und ihr Vater wird sie nicht schlagen.« »Ich will diese eine Nacht noch bei dir bleiben«, sagte die Schwalbe, »aber ich kann dir das Auge nicht ausreißen. Du wärest dann ja ganz blind.«

»Schwalbe, Schwalbe, kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der Prinz, »tu, wie ich dich heiße.«

Da riß sie des Prinzen anderes Auge aus und stieß damit hinab auf den Platz. Sie schwirrte an dem Streichholzmädchen vorbei und ließ das Juwel in ihre Hand gleiten. »Was für ein hübsches Stückchen Glas!« rief die Kleine; und lachend lief sie heim.

Dann kam die Schwalbe zurück zu dem Prinzen. »Du bist nun blind«, sagte sie, »so will ich immerdar bei dir bleiben.«

»Nein, kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der arme Prinz, »du mußt nach Ägypten reisen.«

»Ich will immerdar bei dir bleiben«, sagte die Schwalbe, und zu Füßen des Prinzen schlief sie ein.

Den ganzen folgenden Tag saß sie auf des Prinzen Schulter und erzählte ihm von allerlei Seltsamem, das sie in fremden Landen geschaut hatte. Sie erzählte ihm von den roten Ibissen, die in langen Reihen an den Ufern des Niles stehen und mit ihren Schnäbeln Goldfische fangen; von der Sphinx, die so alt ist wie die Welt und in der Wüste lebt und jedes Ding weiß; von den Kaufleuten, die gemessenen Schrittes zur Seite ihrer Kamele gehen und Rosenkränze aus Bernstein in den Händen tragen; von dem König der Mondberge, der schwarz ist wie Ebenholz und einen riesigen Kristall anbetet; von der großen grünen Schlange, die in einem Palmbaum schläft und zwanzig Priester um sich hat, ihr zu dienen und sie mit Honigkuchen zu füttern; und von den Pygmäen, die über einen großen See auf flachen breiten Blättern segeln und allzeit im Krieg liegen mit den Schmetterlingen.

»Liebe kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der Prinz, »du erzählst mir von wundersamen Dingen, aber wundersamer als alles in der Welt ist das Menschenleid. Kein Wunder ist so tief wie die Wunden des Elends. Flieg über meine Stadt, kleine Schwalbe, und erzähl mir, was du dort siehst.«

So flog die kleine Schwalbe über die große Stadt und sah, wie sich's die Reichen in ihren schönen Häusern wohl sein ließen, indes die Bettler draußen an den Toren saßen. Sie flog in dunkle Gassen und sah die weißen Gesichter hungernder Kinder, die unfroh auf die düsteren Straßen blickten. Unter einem Brückenbogen lagen zwei kleine Jungen, einer in des andern Arm geschmiegt, um sich zu wärmen. »Wir haben solchen Hunger!« sagten sie. »Ihr dürft hier nicht liegen!« brüllte der Wächter, und sie gingen hinaus in den Regen.

Da flog die Schwalbe zurück und erzählte dem Prinzen, was sie gesehen hatte.

»Ich bin mit feinem Golde bedeckt«, sagte der Prinz, »das sollst du abheben, Blatt um Blatt, und meinen Armen geben; die Lebenden meinen, daß Gold sie glücklich machen könne.« Blatt für Blatt des feinen Goldes pickte die Schwalbe ab, bis der glückliche Prinz ganz stumpf und grau aussah. Blatt für Blatt des feinen Goldes brachte sie den Armen, und die Wangen der Kinder erblühten, und sie lachten und spielten ihre Spiele auf den Straßen. »Nun haben wir Brot!« riefen sie.

Dann kam der Schnee, und nach dem Schnee kam der Frost. Die Straßen sahen aus, als wären sie aus Silber geschmiedet, so hell glitzerten sie; lange Eiszapfen, kristallenen Dolchen gleich, hingen von den Dächern der Häuser, alle Welt ging in Pelzen einher, und die kleinen Jungen trugen rote Wollkappen und liefen Schlittschuh auf dem Eise.

Die arme kleine Schwalbe fror und fror immer ärger, aber sie wollte den Prinzen nicht verlassen, dazu hatte sie ihn zu lieb. Sie pickte Krumen vor der Tür des Bäckers auf, wenn der Bäcker nicht hinsah, und suchte sich zu wärmen, indem sie mit den Flügeln schlug.

Endlich aber erkannte sie, daß sie sterben müsse. Sie hatte gerade noch Kraft genug, sich noch einmal auf des Prinzen Schulter zu schwingen. »Leb wohl, lieber Prinz!« sagte sie leise, »darf ich deine Hand küssen?«

»Ich freue mich, daß du endlich nach Ägypten reisest, kleine Schwalbe«, sagte der Prinz, »du bist schon viel zu lange hiergeblieben; aber du mußt mich auf die Lippen küssen, denn ich liebe dich.«

»Nicht nach Ägypten reise ich«, sagte die Schwalbe, »ich reise zum Haus des Todes. Der Tod ist der Bruder des Schlafes, ist's nicht so?«

Und sie küßte den glücklichen Prinzen auf die Lippen und fiel tot zu seinen Füßen nieder.

In diesem Augenblick tönte aus dem Innern des Standbildes ein seltsames Knacken, als ob etwas zerbrochen wäre. Und wirklich, das bleierne Herz war mitten entzweigesprungen. Es war ja auch eine grimmig kalte Nacht.

Früh am nächsten Morgen ging der Bürgermeister mit den Ratsherren unten über den Platz. Als sie an der Säule vorbeikamen, blickte er hinauf zu dem Standbild. »Ach, du liebe Zeit! Wie armselig der glückliche Prinz aussieht!« sagte er. »Gewiß, wie armselig!« riefen die Ratsherren, die stets einer Meinung mit dem Bürgermeister waren; und sie stiegen hinauf, um den Schaden von der Nähe zu besehen.

»Der Rubin ist aus seinem Schwert gefallen, die Augen sind weg, und er ist gar nicht mehr golden«, sagte der Bürgermeister. »Er sieht buchstäblich kaum besser aus als ein Bettler.«

»Kaum besser als ein Bettler«, sagten die Ratsherren. »Und hier liegt wahrhaftig ein toter Vogel vor seinen Füßen!« fuhr der Bürgermeister fort. »Wir müssen tatsächlich eine Verordnung erlassen, daß es Vögeln verboten ist, hier zu sterben.« Und der Stadtschreiber notierte sich diesen Hinweis. Also wurde das Standbild des glücklichen Prinzen herabgeholt. »Da er nicht mehr schön ist, ist er nicht mehr nützlich«, sagte der Kunstprofessor der Universität.

Darauf schmolzen sie das Standbild in einem Schmelzofen, und der Bürgermeister hielt eine Sitzung mit dem Stadtrat ab, um zu entscheiden, was mit dem Metall geschehen solle. »Wir

müssen selbstverständlich ein neues Standbild haben«, sagte er, »und das soll mein eigenes Standbild sein.« »Mein eigenes«, sagte jeder der Ratsherren, und sie zankten sich und stritten. Als ich zuletzt von ihnen hörte, stritten sie sich noch immer.

»Ist das aber merkwürdig!« sagte der Werkmeister in der Schmelzhütte. »Dieses zerbrochene Herz will im Ofen nicht schmelzen. Wir müssen es wegwerfen.« So warfen sie es auf einen Kehrichthaufen, auf dem auch die tote Schwalbe lag. »Bring mir die beiden kostbarsten Dinge dieser Stadt«, sagte Gott zu einem seiner Engel; und der Engel brachte ihm das bleierne Herz und den toten Vogel.

»Du hast recht gewählt«, sagte Gott, »denn in meinem Paradiesgarten soll der kleine Vogel singen für und für, und in meiner goldenen Stadt soll der glückliche Prinz mich lobpreisen.«