de-en  Böll_Stiftung_KI_Teil_1
What is Artificial Intelligence?

Our idea of AI is shaped by science fiction novels and movies from Hollywood.

But what is really possible? What is actually Artificial Intelligence? Who is doing the thinking? Where is AI being used and which problems are there?

"Hello Siri.
Good Morning. Good morning.
What is the weather like today?
Here is the forcast for today.
Will it rain?
Yes, it will probably rain a little.

Siri on our iPhone tells us what the weather will be like, Alexa, Amazon's software, can preheat our oven.

And Samsung's speech assistant can recognise objects that are held in front of the camera and research them on the internet.

Brave smart world: intelligent machines and smart assistants can do more and more things which previously only humans could do: reading, writing, interacting and - more or less - comprehend.

What does this mean for our lives? And how will artificial intelligence change the way we communicate, work and consume? […].

Our perception of artificial intelligence has been shaped by science-fiction novels and Hollywood films: The Terminator, Blade Runner, Her, Odysee 2001 - most of them toy with the idea of a super intelligent machine, a robot out of control, a world in which machines have feelings.

However, what is really possible? In the first episode of this Podcast series, the aim is to clarify the basics. What actually is Artificial Intelligence? Who is doing the thinking? Where is artificial intelligence used and what problems are there.

What is artificial intelligence?

Aljoscha Burchhardt: The idea of AI is, to put it bluntly, that we "wise up" software systems which are either on our smartphone or computer or also on a robot so that they can execute their tasks in such a way as if they had some kind of intelligence.

Aljoscha Burchhardt has been researching at the German Research Centre for Artificial Intelligence in Berlin for 10 years.

In psychology, intelligence is a collective term for a person's cognitive performance.

But what exactly that means is not so easy to say in human terms: Does it mean analytical abilities? Do the emotional ones also belong to it?.

Joachim Fetzer: Artificial Intelligence as it is used in practice and the economy today are technologies in which machines resemble humans so much that we humans get the feeling they are intelligent - which, by the way we sometimes also think of dogs or animals.

Joachim Fetzer is a business ethicist and deals with philosophical and ethical questions related to digitization.

When do we think machines are intelligent and what constitutes their intelligence?

Mirko Knaack: That's probably why my definition is the most accurate: a machine is intelligent when it does something that a person would need intelligence to do.

Mikro Knaack is a computer scientist and heads the Digital Lab at IAV Gmbh, which programs self-propelled cars [...].

Cars are one such example: a machine learns what up to now, only people were believed to be able. ...

And it can even be proven that it is at least just as well, if not better.

Jeanette Hofmann: I'm talking about "machine learning" at present, and I really find this a very interesting development because machines learn to carry out actions independently on the basis of training data, which give them examples, on the basis of clearly defined objectives, which were previously either carried out by people or were not possible at all.

Jeanette Hoffman is Professor of Internet Policy at Freie Universität Berlin.

So you can put it this way: an artificial system learns from examples and can generalize them when the learning phase is over.

This means that the examples are not simply learned by heart, but patterns and laws are "recognized" in the learning data.

The machine generates these findings with the help of an algorithm.

An algorithm specifies a procedure to solve a problem.

This solution plan is then used to convert input data into output data in small steps.

An algorithm is considered artificial intelligence when it learns.

Yvonne Hofstetter, IT entrepreneur and book author: Yvonne Hofstetter: Once we start from information technology, artificial intelligence embodies machines that have a reasoning mechanism, that is, they observe something, they can perceive something.

Those who can learn from it, i.e. are capable of learning.

This brings us to the topic of neural networks and reinforcement learning.

And they are able to make strategic or tactical decisions under uncertainty: That's our definition in IT." We are currently encountering this technology in many areas, a prominent example being Google Translate.

Aljoscha Burchhardt of DFKI explains what "learning" means in this context: "Aljoscha Burchhardt: If you think of a translation system like Google translator or something like that, it is fed with data.

Input record German, output record English and hundreds of thousands of them.

And then this system learns regularities in a mathematical way.

Which word to translate into which word.

And then it can provide the translation service.

But in the end, the system is completely stupid.

It knows nothing of linguistics, it knows nothing of cultures, it doesn't know the meaning of red - but it can simply translate red into 'rouge' and it also knows that a red car must become 'voiture rouge'.

That I have to twist adjectives and nouns, so to speak, but not on a linguistic basis or something, but it can simply do it.

In other words, it is actually a completely interesting one-track specialist, an autistic system.

But why is there such a hype about Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence now?

After all, the conference in 1956 at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire is considered the birth-hour of Artificial Intelligence.

So it is more than 60 years old.

But it was not until the 1980s that the first artificial neural networks as we know them today were developed.

These networks replicate the neuronal network of the human brain and have the promising property of learning their rules by themselves.

Aljoscha Burchhardt: At that time, however, there was still a lack of data and computer power.

And so we have worked first with other methods for the last 20 years and these are the methods that have actually brought the big hype today.

We have data, we have computer power, we can translate, we can drive a car, we can beat people in Go.

Artificial neural networks consist of very simple but extremely many mathematical functions that are networked with each other.

In the course of the training, according to countless examples, they learn what makes a face or what defines a cat.

With each new practice, the net receives feedback and adjusts its parameters accordingly.

With the drastically reduced storage costs of recent years and the exponentially increased performance of computers, the possibilities of artificial neural networks have also developed further.

And above all, we provide all the data AI needs to learn.

We upload pictures to the Internet, write messages on social networks, we use speech recognition of our smartphones.
unit 1
Was ist Künstliche Intelligenz?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 3
Doch was ist wirklich möglich?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 4
Was ist eigentlich Künstliche Intelligenz?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 5
Wer denkt da?
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 6
Wo wird künstliche Intelligenz eingesetzt und welche Probleme gibt es?.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 7
„Hallo Siri.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 8
Moin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 9
Moin.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 10
Wie ist das Wetter heute?.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 11
Hier ist die Vorhersage für heute.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 12
Wird es regnen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 13
Ja, es wird vermutlich etwas regnen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 17
Was bedeutet das für unser Leben?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 19
[…].
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 21
Doch was ist wirklich möglich?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 22
In Folge 1 dieser Podcast-Reihe geht es darum, die Grundlagen zu klären.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 23
Was ist eigentlich Künstliche Intelligenz?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 24
Wer denkt da?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 25
Wo wird Künstliche Intelligenz eingesetzt und welche Probleme gibt es?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 26
Was ist Künstliche Intelligenz?.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 31
Gehören auch die emotionalen dazu?.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 34
Wann denken wir bei Maschinen sie seien intelligent und was macht ihre Intelligenz aus?.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 37
Autos sind so ein Beispiel: eine Maschine lernt, was bisher nur Menschen zu können glaubten.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 38
Und ist darin sogar nachweislich mindestens genauso gut, wenn nicht besser.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 40
Jeanette Hoffman ist Professorin für Internetpolitik an der Freien Universität Berlin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 43
Diese Erkenntnisse generiert die Maschine mit Hilfe eines Algorithmus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 44
Ein Algorithmus gibt eine Vorgehensweise vor, um ein Problem zu lösen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 45
unit 46
Ein Algorithmus gilt dann als Künstliche Intelligenz, wenn er lernt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 48
Die daraus lernen können, also lernfähig sind.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 49
Damit sind wir beim Thema neuronale Netze, Reinforcement-Learning angekommen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 52
Eingabesatz Deutsch, Ausgabesatz Englisch und davon Hunderttausende.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 53
Und dann lernt dieses System auf eine mathematische Art und Weise Regularitäten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 54
Welches Wort man in welches Wort übersetzen muss.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 55
Und dann kann es die Übersetzungsleistung erbringen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 56
Aber letztlich ist das System dabei komplett dumm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 59
Das heißt: Es ist eigentlich ein vollkommen interessanter Fachidiot, ein autistisches System.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 60
Warum aber dieser Hype um Maschinelles Lernen und Künstliche Intelligenz jetzt?.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 62
Sie ist also mehr als 60 Jahre alt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 65
Aljoscha Burchhardt: Damals fehlte es aber noch an Daten und Computpower.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 70
Mit jedem neuen Training erhält das Netz Feedback und justiert daraufhin seine Parameter neu.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 49  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 57  1 month, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 30  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3749  commented on  unit 32  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 57  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 15  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 8  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 16  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 7  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 26  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 25  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 21  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 22  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 17  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 12  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 13  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 18  1 month, 1 week ago

Was ist Künstliche Intelligenz?

Unsere Vorstellung von Künstlicher Intelligenz ist geprägt durch Science-Fiction-Romane und Filme aus Hollywood.

Doch was ist wirklich möglich? Was ist eigentlich Künstliche Intelligenz? Wer denkt da? Wo wird künstliche Intelligenz eingesetzt und welche Probleme gibt es?.

„Hallo Siri.
Moin. Moin.
Wie ist das Wetter heute?.
Hier ist die Vorhersage für heute.
Wird es regnen?
Ja, es wird vermutlich etwas regnen.

Siri in unserem Iphone sagt uns wie das Wetter wird, Alexa, die Software von Amazon, kann unseren Backofen vorwärmen.

Und Samsungs Sprachassistent Bixby kann Gegenstände, die vor die Kamera gehalten werden, erkennen und im Netz recherchieren.

Schöne smarte Welt: intelligente Maschinen und smarte Assistenten können immer mehr Dinge, die bisher nur Menschen konnten: Lesen, schreiben, interagieren und – mehr oder weniger – verstehen.

Was bedeutet das für unser Leben? Und wie wird künstliche Intelligenz die Art und Weise verändern wie wir kommunizieren, arbeiten, lernen und konsumieren? […].

Unsere Vorstellung von Künstlicher Intelligenz ist geprägt durch Science-Fiction-Romane und -filme aus Hollywood: Terminator, Blade Runner, Her, Odysee 2001 – meist spielen sie mit der Idee einer superintelligenten Maschine, eines Roboters außer Kontrolle, einer Welt, in der Maschinen fühlen können.

Doch was ist wirklich möglich? In Folge 1 dieser Podcast-Reihe geht es darum, die Grundlagen zu klären. Was ist eigentlich Künstliche Intelligenz? Wer denkt da? Wo wird Künstliche Intelligenz eingesetzt und welche Probleme gibt es?

Was ist Künstliche Intelligenz?.

Aljoscha Burchhardt: Bei der künstlichen Intelligenz ist die Idee mal ganz platt gesprochen, dass wir Software-Systeme, die entweder auf unserem Smartphone oder Computer oder auch auf einem Roboter sind, ‚aufschlauen’, sodass sie ihre Aufgaben so erledigen, als wären sie ein Stück weit intelligent.

Aljoscha Burchhardt forscht seit 10 Jahren am Deutschen Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz in Berlin.

Intelligenz ist in der Psychologie ein Sammelbegriff für die kognitive Leistungsfähigkeit eines Menschen.

Aber was das genau meint, ist schon beim Menschen nicht so ganz leicht zu sagen: Meint es die analytischen Fähigkeiten? Gehören auch die emotionalen dazu?.

Joachim Fetzer: Künstliche Intelligenz wie sie heute in der Praxis und in der Wirtschaft stattfindet, sind Technologien, bei denen Maschinen irgendwie so ähnlich werden, dass wir Menschen das Gefühl haben, da sei was intelligent - was wir manchmal übrigens auch bei Hunden oder bei Tieren denken.

Joachim Fetzer ist Wirtschaftsethiker und setzt sich mit philosophischen und ethischen Fragen rund um die Digitalisierung auseinander.

Wann denken wir bei Maschinen sie seien intelligent und was macht ihre Intelligenz aus?.

Mirko Knaack: Darum ist meine Definition wahrscheinlich am ehesten: eine Maschine ist genau dann intelligent, wenn sie etwas tut, wozu ein Mensch Intelligenz bräuchte.

Mikro Knaack ist Informatiker und leitet das Digital Lab der IAV Gmbh, die selbstfahrende Autos programmiert […].

Autos sind so ein Beispiel: eine Maschine lernt, was bisher nur Menschen zu können glaubten.

Und ist darin sogar nachweislich mindestens genauso gut, wenn nicht besser.

Jeanette Hofmann: Ich spreche zurzeit von "machine learning" und das finde ich tatsächlich eine sehr interessante Entwicklung, weil hier Maschinen anhand von Trainingsdaten, die ihnen Beispiele vorgeben, auf klar definierte Ziele hin lernen, eigenständig Handlungen auszuführen, die bislang entweder von Menschen ausgeübt wurden oder so gar nicht möglich waren.

Jeanette Hoffman ist Professorin für Internetpolitik an der Freien Universität Berlin.

Man kann es also so sagen: Ein künstliches System lernt aus Beispielen und kann diese verallgemeinern, wenn die Lernphase beendet ist.

Das heißt, es werden nicht einfach die Beispiele auswendig gelernt, sondern es „erkennt“ Muster und Gesetzmäßigkeiten in den Lerndaten.

Diese Erkenntnisse generiert die Maschine mit Hilfe eines Algorithmus.

Ein Algorithmus gibt eine Vorgehensweise vor, um ein Problem zu lösen.

Anhand dieses Lösungsplans werden dann in kleinen Schritten Eingabedaten in Ausgabedaten umgewandelt.

Ein Algorithmus gilt dann als Künstliche Intelligenz, wenn er lernt.

Yvonne Hofstetter, IT-Unternehmerin und Buchautorin:

Yvonne Hofstetter: Wenn wir erst mal von der Informationstechnologie ausgehen, dann sind künstliche Intelligenzen Maschinen, die einen Reasoning-Mechanismus haben, also etwas beobachten, etwas wahrnehmen können.

Die daraus lernen können, also lernfähig sind.

Damit sind wir beim Thema neuronale Netze, Reinforcement-Learning angekommen.

Und die sind in der Lage strategische oder taktische Entscheidungen unter Unsicherheit zu treffen: Das ist unsere Definition in der IT.“

Diese Technologie begegnet uns derzeit in vielen Bereichen, prominentes Beispiel ist etwa Google Translate.

Was „Lernen“ in diesem Zusammenhang bedeutet, erklärt Aljoscha Burchhardt vom DFKI:

Aljoscha Burchhardt: Wenn ihr an ein Übersetzungssystem denkt, so wie Google-Übersetzer oder so, das wird mit Daten gefüttert.

Eingabesatz Deutsch, Ausgabesatz Englisch und davon Hunderttausende.

Und dann lernt dieses System auf eine mathematische Art und Weise Regularitäten.

Welches Wort man in welches Wort übersetzen muss.

Und dann kann es die Übersetzungsleistung erbringen.

Aber letztlich ist das System dabei komplett dumm.

Das weiß nichts von Linguistik, das weiß nichts von Kulturen, das weiß nicht was rot bedeutet - aber es kann rot eben in ‚rouge’ übersetzen und es weiß auch, dass rotes Auto ‚voiture rouge’ werden muss.

Dass ich also sozusagen Adjektive und Nomen verdrehen muss, aber nicht auf linguistischer Basis oder so, sondern es kann es einfach tun.

Das heißt: Es ist eigentlich ein vollkommen interessanter Fachidiot, ein autistisches System.

Warum aber dieser Hype um Maschinelles Lernen und Künstliche Intelligenz jetzt?.

Schließlich gilt eine Konferenz im Jahr 1956 am Dartmouth College in New Hampshire als Geburtsstunde der Künstlichen Intelligenz.

Sie ist also mehr als 60 Jahre alt.

Doch erst in den 1980er Jahren wurden die ersten künstlichen neuronalen Netze entwickelt, wie wir sie heute kennen.

Diese Netze bilden das Neuronennetz des menschliche Gehirns nach und haben die viel versprechende Eigenschaft, ihre Regeln von Grund auf selbst zu lernen.

Aljoscha Burchhardt: Damals fehlte es aber noch an Daten und Computpower.

Und so hat man erst mal mit anderen Verfahren gearbeitet die letzten 20 Jahre und das sind dann eben diese Verfahren, die heute eigentlich den großen Hype gebracht haben.

Wir haben Daten, wir haben Computpower, wir können übersetzen, wir können ein Auto steuern, wir können Menschen im Go schlagen.

Künstliche neuronale Netze bestehen aus sehr einfachen, dafür aber extrem vielen miteinander vernetzten mathematischen Funktionen.

Im Laufe des Trainings, nach Ansicht von unzähligen Beispielen, lernen sie etwa, was ein Gesicht ausmacht oder was eine Katze definiert.

Mit jedem neuen Training erhält das Netz Feedback und justiert daraufhin seine Parameter neu.

Mit den drastisch gefallenen Speicherkosten der vergangenen Jahre und der exponentiell gestiegenen Leistungsfähigkeit der Computer haben sich auch die Möglichkeiten künstlicher neuronalen Netze weiterentwickelt.

Und vor allem liefern wir alle die Daten, die Künstliche Intelligenz zum Lernen braucht.

Wir laden Bilder ins Internet, schreiben Nachrichten in den sozialen Netzwerken, wir benutzen die Spracherkennung unserer Smartphones.