de-en  Die Nachtigall und die Rose von Oscar Wilde
The Nightingale and the Rose "She said that she would dance with me if I brought her red roses," cried the young student; "but in all my garden there is no red rose." In her nest on the oak tree the nightingale heard him, looked out through the leaves and wondered.

"No red rose in all my garden!" he cried, and his beautiful eyes were full of tears. "Oh, on what little things does happiness depend. I have read all that the wise men have written, all the secrets of philosophy are mine, and because of a red rose my life is unhappy and miserable." This at last is a true lover," said the nightingale. "Night after night have I sung of him although I did not know him; night after night have I told his story to the stars and now I see him. His hair is dark like the hyacinth, and his mouth is red like the rose of his longing; but passion has made his face pale as ivory, and sorrow has pressed its seal on his forehead. "The prince is giving a ball tomorrow night," the young student said quietly, "and my beloved will be there. If I bring her a red rose, she'll dance with me till dawn. If I bring her a red rose, she will lean her head against my shoulder, and her hand will rest in mine. But there is no red rose in my garden, so I will sit alone, and she will pass me by. She won't pay attention to me, and she will break my heart." "That indeed is the true lover," said the nightingale. "Of what I sing, he suffers for; what is joy to me is pain to him. Truly, love is something wonderful! It is more precious than emeralds and dearer than fine opals. Pearls and garnets cannot buy it, and nor is it for sale in the markets. It cannot be traded by merchants and cannot be weighed for gold on a scale." "The musicians will sit in their gallery," said the young student, "and play on their stringed instruments, and my beloved will dance to the sound of the harp and the violin. She will dance so lightly that her feet will not touch the floor, and the courtiers in their colorful dresses will throng around her. But she will not dance with me, for I have no red rose for her," and he threw himself into the grass, hiding his face in his hands and cried.

"Why is he crying?" asked a small green lizard which was passing him holding his little tail up inthe air. "Yes, why?" asked a butterfly which was chasing a sunbeam.

"He is crying for a red rose," said the nightingale.

"For a red rose?" they all exclaimed. "How ridiculous!" And the little lizard, who was something of a cynic, laughed loudly. ...

But the nightingale knew about the student's woe and sat silently in the oak tree and refected on the mystery of love. Suddenly she spread her brown wings and flew up. Like a shadow it scurried through the grove, and like a shadow it flew over the garden.

There was a wonderful rosebush in the middle of the lawn and when she saw it she flew towards it and alighted on a twig.

"Give me a red rose," she cried, "and I will sing you my sweetest song for it." But the bush shook its head. "My roses are white," it answered, "as white as the foam of the sea and whiter than the snow on the mountains. But go to my brother who is growing round the old sundial, and perhaps he will give you what you want." So the nightingale flew over to the rose bush by the old sundial.

"Giv me a red rose," she cried," and I will sing you my sweetest song."

"My roses are yellow," it answered, "as yellow as a mermaid's hair who is sitting on a throne of amber, and yellower than the yellow daffodil which flowers on the meadow before the reaper comes with his scythe. But go to my brother who grows beneath the student's window, and perhaps he will give you what you want." So the nightingale flew over the rose bush that was growing beneath the student's window. "Give me a red rose," she cried, " and I will sing you my sweetest song for it." But the rose bush shook its head. "My roses are red," he replied, "as red as the feet of the dove and redder than the fans of coral that wave and wave in the ocean cavern.. But the winter froze my veins, the frost bit my buds in two and the storm broke my twigs and therefore I have no roses this whole year." "Only a single rose do I need," the nighingale exclaimed, "only one red rose! Is there nothing at all that I can do to get a red rose?" "There is a means," replied the shrub, "but it is so terrible that I don't have the courage to tell you." "Tell me," said the nightingale, "I'm not afraid." "If you want to have a red rose," said the bush, "then you must create it out of songs by moonlight and dye it with the blood of your own heart. You must sing for me and press your breast against a thorn. You must sing all night and the thorn must pierce your heart and your lifeblood must flow into my veins and become mine." "Death is a high price for a red rose," the nightingale said, "and life is very precious to all of us. It is amusing to sit in the green forest and see the sun in its golden carriage and the moon in its pearl carriage. Sweet is the smell of the whitethorn, and sweet are the bellflowers in the valley and the heather on the hills. But love is more important than life, and what is a bird's life compaired to a man's life?" So it spread its brown vans and took wings. Like a shadow she floated over the garden, and like a shadow she scampered through the copse.

The young student still lay there in the grass just as it hat left him and the tears of his beautiful eyes had not been stilled yet.

"Be happy," cried the nightingale, "be happy; you shall have your red rose. I will form it from songs sung by the moonlight and dye it with the blood of my own heart. All I want you to do is to be true to your love; for love is wiser than philosophy even though it is also wise, and more powerful than power, even though it is powerful too. Flaming colors are her wings, and flaming colors are her body. Her lips are like honey and her breath is like incense." The student looked up from the grass and listened, but he could not understand what the nightingale was saying for he only understood books.

But the oak tree understood und became sad for he loved the little nightingale a lot which had built its nest in his branches.

"Sing me one last song," he whispered; "I'll feel very lonely when you're gone." And the nightingale sang for the oak tree, and her voice was like water flowing from a silver jug.

When she had ended her song, the student stood up and took a notebook and a pencil out of his pocket.

"She has form," he said to himself as he stepped out of the grove," - she has a talent for form that cannot be denied her; but whether she also has feeling? I'm afraid not. She will probably be like most artists: all style and no real inwardness. She' d hardly sacrifice herself for others. She thinks above all of the music, and you know how egotistical the arts are. However, one must admit, she has some nice tones in her voice. It is a pity that they have no sense at all, express nothing and are without practical value." And he went up to his room and lay down on his narrow cot and began to think of his love; soon he had fallen asleep.

And when the moon appeared in the heavens, the nightingale flew to the rose bush and pressed her breast against the thorn. All night long she sang, her breast pressed against the thorn, and the cold crystalline moon bowed down and listened. The whole night she sang, and the thorn penetrated deeper and deeper into her chest, and her life blood seeped away from her.

First she sang of the beginning of love in the heart of a boy and a girl. And at the top of the rose bush a magnificent rose blossomed, petal after petal lined up like song after song. At first it was as pale as the mist that hangs over the river, as pale as the feet of the morning, and as silver as the wings of dawn. Like the silhouette of a rose in a silver mirror, like the silhouette of a rose in a pond, thus was the rose that bloomed at the top of the rose bush.

But he called out to the nightingale that she should press herself even harder against the thorn. "Press harder, little nightingale," he shouted, "otherwise the day will break before the rose is finished." And so the nightingale pressed harder against the thorn, and her song became louder and louder, for she now sang of the awakening of passion in the soul of man and woman.

And a tender red appeared on the petals of the rose, like the blush on the face of the bridegroom when he kisses the lips of his bride. But the thorn had not yet reached her heart, and so the heart of the rose remained white, for only a nightingale's heart blood can color the heart of a rose. And the bush called to the nightingale, that she should press herself harder against the thorn. "Press harder, little nightingale," he cried, "otherwise it will be the day before the rose is finished." And so the nightingale pressed harder against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a violent pain twitched through her. Bitter, bitter was the pain, and wilder, wilder was the song, for she now sang of the love which death transfigures, of the love which does not even die in the grave. And the wonderful rose turned red like the rose color of the eastern sky. Red was the band of its petals, and red as a ruby was its heart. But the nightingale's voice became weaker and her small wings began to tremble, and a light shroud was on her eyes. Her song became weaker and weaker, and she felt something in her throat.

Then she sobbed up once more in last tones. The white moon heard it, and he forgot to go down and lingered in the sky. The red rose heard it and trembled with delight, opening its leaves to the cool morning wind. The echo carried it into its purple cave in the mountains and woke the sleeping shepherds from their dreams. It floated over the reeds by the river, and it carried the message to the sea. "Look, look", shouted the rose bush, "the rose is finished now;" but the nightingale gave no answer, for she was lying dead in the long grass, with the thorn in her heart.

At noon the student opened his window and looked out. "What a miracle and luck", he shouted, "there's a red rose! In my life I have never seen such a rose. It is so beautiful, I am sure, it has a long Latin name, " and he leaned out and picked it. Then he put on his hat and ran into the professor's house with the rose in his hand.

The professor's daughter was sitting in the entrance, waving blue silk on a spool and her little dog lay at her feet.

" You said, you would dance with me, if I brought you a red rose," the student said. " Here's the reddest rose of the world. Wear it on your heart tonight and when we dance together, it will tell you, how I love you ." But the girl distorted her mouth. "I'm afraid it doesn't match my dress," she said; "and then the chamberlain's nephew sent me real jewels, and everybody knows that jewels are worth more than flowers." "Truly you are very ungrateful," the student exclaimed; and he threw the rose on the street, where it fell into the gutter, and a wagon wheel ran over it. " Ungrateful?" said the girl. "I want to tell you something: You are very ill mannered- and then: who are you actually? A student, nothing more. I don't think, you have even silver buckles on your shoes like the chamberlain's nephew." And she got up and went into the house.

"How stupid is love," said the student as he left; "it is not half as useful as logic, for it does not prove anything and it is always telling of things that will not happen, and making one believe things that are not true. It is really something quite impractical, and since the practical is everything in our time, I'll go back to philosophy and study metaphysics". So he went back to his room and got out a big dusty book and began to read.
unit 2
unit 3
»Ach, an was für kleinen Dingen das Glück hängt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 7
Wenn ich ihr eine rote Rose bringe, wird sie mit mir tanzen bis zum Morgen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 11
»Was ich singe, um das leidet er; was mir Freude ist, das ist ihm Schmerz.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 12
Wahrhaftig, die Liebe ist etwas Wundervolles!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 13
Kostbarer ist sie als Smaragde und teurer als feine Opale.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 14
Perlen und Granaten können sie nicht kaufen, und auf den Märkten wird sie nicht feilgeboten.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 19
»Ja warum?« fragte ein Schmetterling, der einem Sonnenstrahl nachjagte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 20
»Er weint um eine rote Rose«, sagte die Nachtigall.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 21
»Um eine rote Rose?« riefen alle.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 22
»Wie lächerlich!« Und der kleine Eidechs, der so etwas wie ein Zyniker war, lachte überlaut.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 24
Plötzlich breitete sie ihre braunen Flügel aus und flog auf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 25
Wie ein Schatten huschte sie durch das Gehölz, und wie ein Schatten flog sie über den Garten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 37
Du mußt für mich singen und deine Brust an einen Dorn pressen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 42
unit 44
»Freu dich«, rief die Nachtigall, »freu dich; du sollst deine rote Rose haben.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 45
Ich will sie beim Mondlicht bilden aus Liedern und färben mit meinem eignen Herzblut.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 47
Flammfarben sind ihre Flügel, und flammfarben ist ihr Leib.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 53
Ich fürchte, nein.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 54
Sie wird wohl sein wie die meisten Künstler: alles nur Stil und keine echte Innerlichkeit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 55
Sie würde sich kaum für andere opfern.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 56
Sie denkt vor allem an die Musik, und man weiß ja, wie egoistisch die Künste sind.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 57
Aber zugeben muß man, sie hat einige schöne Töne in ihrer Stimme.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 62
Zuerst sang sie von dem Werden der Liebe in dem Herzen eines Knaben und eines Mädchens.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 66
Der aber rief der Nachtigall zu, daß sie sich fester noch gegen den Dorn presse.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 70
Und der Strauch rief der Nachtigall zu, daß sie sich fester noch gegen den Dorn drücke.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 73
Und die wundervolle Rose färbte sich rot wie die Rose des östlichen Himmels.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 74
Rot war der Gürtel ihrer Blätter, und rot wie ein Rubin war ihr Herz.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 76
Schwächer und schwächer wurde ihr Lied, und sie fühlte etwas in der Kehle.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 77
Dann schluchzte sie noch einmal auf in letzten Tönen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 78
Der weiße Mond hörte es, und er vergaß unterzugehen und verweilte am Himmel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 79
unit 81
Es schwebte über das Schilf am Fluß, und der trug die Botschaft dem Meere zu.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 83
Um Mittag öffnete der Student sein Fenster und blickte hinaus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 84
»Was für ein Wunder und Glück«, rief er; »da ist eine rote Rose!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 85
Nie in meinem Leben habe ich eine solche Rose gesehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 87
Dann setzte er seinen Hut auf und lief dem Professor ins Haus, mit der Rose in der Hand.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 89
unit 90
»Hier ist die röteste Rose der Welt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 93
»Undankbar?« sagte das Mädchen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 94
»Ich will Euch was sagen: Ihr seid sehr ungezogen – und dann: wer seid Ihr eigentlich?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 95
Ein Student, nichts weiter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 92  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 63  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 64  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 58  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 49  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 45  1 month, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 62  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 17  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 59  1 month, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 73  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 68  1 month, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 73  1 month, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 39  1 month, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 18  1 month, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 5  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 38  1 month, 1 week ago

Die Nachtigall und die Rose
»Sie sagte, sie würde mit mir tanzen, wenn ich ihr rote Rosen brächte«, rief der junge Student; »aber in meinem ganzen Garten ist keine rote Rose.« In ihrem Nest auf dem Eichbaum hörte ihn die Nachtigall, guckte durch das Laub und wunderte sich.

»Keine rote Rose in meinem ganzen Garten!« rief er, und seine schönen Augen waren voll Tränen. »Ach, an was für kleinen Dingen das Glück hängt. Alles habe ich gelesen, was weise Männer geschrieben haben, alle Geheimnisse der Philosophie sind mein, und wegen einer roten Rose ist mein Leben unglücklich und elend.«

Das ist endlich einmal ein treuer Liebhaber«, sagte die Nachtigall. »Nacht für Nacht habe ich von ihm gesungen, obgleich ich ihn nicht kannte; Nacht für Nacht habe ich seine Geschichte den Sternen erzählt, und nun seh' ich ihn. Sein Haar ist dunkel wie die Hyazinthe, und sein Mund ist rot wie die Rose seiner Sehnsucht; aber Leidenschaft hat sein Gesicht bleich wie Elfenbein gemacht, und der Kummer hat ihm sein Siegel auf die Stirn gedrückt.«

Der Prinz gibt morgen nacht einen Ball«, sprach der junge Student leise, »und meine Geliebte wird dasein. Wenn ich ihr eine rote Rose bringe, wird sie mit mir tanzen bis zum Morgen. Wenn ich ihr eine rote Rose bringe, wird sie ihren Kopf an meine Schulter lehnen, und ihre Hand wird in der meinen liegen. Aber in meinem Garten ist keine rote Rose, so werde ich einsam sitzen, und sie wird an mir vorübergehen. Sie wird meiner nicht achten, und mir wird das Herz brechen.«

»Das ist wirklich der treue Liebhaber«, sagte die Nachtigall. »Was ich singe, um das leidet er; was mir Freude ist, das ist ihm Schmerz. Wahrhaftig, die Liebe ist etwas Wundervolles! Kostbarer ist sie als Smaragde und teurer als feine Opale. Perlen und Granaten können sie nicht kaufen, und auf den Märkten wird sie nicht feilgeboten. Sie kann von den Kaufleuten nicht gehandelt werden und kann nicht für Gold ausgewogen werden auf der Waage.«

»Die Musikanten werden auf ihrer Galerie sitzen«, sagte der junge Student, »und auf ihren Saiteninstrumenten spielen, und meine Geliebte wird zum Klang der Harfe und der Geige tanzen. So leicht wird sie tanzen, daß ihre Füße den Boden kaum berühren, und die Höflinge in ihren bunten Gewändern werden sich um sie scharen. Aber mit mir wird sie nicht tanzen, denn ich habe keine rote Rose für sie«; und er warf sich ins Gras, barg sein Gesicht in den Händen und weinte.

»Weshalb weint er?« fragte ein kleiner grüner Eidechs, während er mit dem Schwänzchen in der Luft an ihm vorbeilief. »Ja warum?« fragte ein Schmetterling, der einem Sonnenstrahl nachjagte.

»Er weint um eine rote Rose«, sagte die Nachtigall.

»Um eine rote Rose?« riefen alle. »Wie lächerlich!« Und der kleine Eidechs, der so etwas wie ein Zyniker war, lachte überlaut.

Aber die Nachtigall wußte um des Studenten Kummer und saß schweigend in dem Eichbaum und sann über das Geheimnis der Liebe. Plötzlich breitete sie ihre braunen Flügel aus und flog auf. Wie ein Schatten huschte sie durch das Gehölz, und wie ein Schatten flog sie über den Garten.

Da stand mitten auf dem Rasen ein wundervoller Rosenstock, und als sie ihn sah, flog sie auf ihn zu und setzte sich auf einen Zweig.

»Gib mir eine rote Rose«, rief sie, »und ich will dir dafür mein süßestes Lied singen.«

Aber der Strauch schüttelte seinen Kopf. »Meine Rosen sind weiß«, antwortete er, »so weiß wie der Schaum des Meeres und weißer als der Schnee auf den Bergen. Aber geh zu meinem Bruder, der sich um die alte Sonnenuhr rankt, der gibt dir vielleicht, was du verlangst.«

So flog die Nachtigall hinüber zu dem Rosenstrauch bei der alten Sonnenuhr.

»Gib mir eine rote Rose«, rief sie, »und ich will dir dafür mein süßestes Lied singen.«

Aber der Strauch schüttelte seinen Kopf.

»Meine Rosen sind gelb«, antwortete er, »so gelb wie das Haar der Meerjungfrau, die auf einem Bernsteinthrone sitzt, und gelber als die gelbe Narzisse, die auf der Wiese blüht, bevor der Mäher mit seiner Sense kommt. Aber geh zu meinem Bruder, der unter des Studenten Fenster blüht, und vielleicht gibt der dir, was du verlangst.«

So flog die Nachtigall zum Rosenstrauch unter des Studenten Fenster. »Gib mir eine rote Rose«, rief sie, »und ich will dir dafür mein süßestes Lied singen.«

Aber der Rosenstrauch schüttelte den Kopf. »Meine Rosen sind rot«, antwortete er, »so rot wie die Füße der Taube und röter als die Korallenfächer, die in der Meergrotte fächeln. Aber der Winter machte meine Adern erstarren, der Frost hat meine Knospen zerbissen und der Sturm meine Zweige gebrochen, und so habe ich keine Rosen dies ganze Jahr.«

»Nur eine einzige rote Rose brauche ich«, rief die Nachtigall, »nur eine rote Rose! Gibt es denn nichts, daß ich eine rote Rose bekomme?«

»Ein Mittel gibt es«, antwortete der Strauch, »aber es ist so schrecklich, daß ich mir es dir nicht zu sagen traue.«

»Sag es mir«, sprach die Nachtigall, »ich fürchte mich nicht.«

»Wenn du eine rote Rose haben willst«, sagte der Strauch, »dann mußt du sie beim Mondlicht aus Liedern machen und sie färben mit deinem eignen Herzblut. Du mußt für mich singen und deine Brust an einen Dorn pressen. Die ganze Nacht mußt du singen, und der Dorn muß dein Herz durchbohren, und dein Lebensblut muß in meine Adern fließen und mein werden.«

»Der Tod ist ein hoher Preis für eine rote Rose«, sagte die Nachtigall, »und das Leben ist allen sehr teuer. Es ist lustig, im grünen Wald zu sitzen und die Sonne in ihrem goldenen Wagen zu sehen und den Mond in seinem Perlenwagen. Süß ist der Duft des Weißdorns, und süß sind die Glockenblumen im Tale und das Heidekraut auf den Hügeln. Aber die Liebe ist besser als das Leben, und was ist ein Vogelherz gegen ein Menschenherz?«

So breitete sie ihre braunen Flügel und flog auf. Wie ein Schatten schwebte sie über den Garten, und wie ein Schatten huschte sie durch das Gehölz.

Da lag noch der junge Student im Grase, wie sie ihn verlassen hatte und die Tränen seiner schönen Augen waren noch nicht getrocknet.

»Freu dich«, rief die Nachtigall, »freu dich; du sollst deine rote Rose haben. Ich will sie beim Mondlicht bilden aus Liedern und färben mit meinem eignen Herzblut. Alles, was ich von dir dafür verlange, ist, daß du deiner Liebe treu bleiben sollst; denn die Liebe ist weiser als die Philosophie, wenn die auch weise ist, und mächtiger als Macht, wenn die auch mächtig ist. Flammfarben sind ihre Flügel, und flammfarben ist ihr Leib. Ihre Lippen sind süß wie Honig, und ihr Atem ist wie Weihrauch.«

Der Student blickte aus dem Grase auf und horchte; aber er konnte nicht verstehen, was die Nachtigall zu ihm sprach, denn er verstand nur die Bücher.

Aber der Eichbaum verstand und ward traurig, denn er liebte die kleine Nachtigall sehr, die ihr Nest in seinen Zweigen gebaut hatte.

»Sing mir noch ein letztes Lied«, flüsterte er; »ich werd' mich sehr einsam fühlen, wenn du fort bist.« Und die Nachtigall sang für den Eichbaum, und ihre Stimme war wie Wasser, das aus einem silbernen Kruge rinnt.

Als sie ihr Lied geendet hatte, stand der Student auf und nahm ein Notizbuch und einen Bleistift aus der Tasche.

»Sie hat Form«, sagte er zu sich, als er aus dem Gehölz schritt, »– sie hat ein Formtalent, das kann ihr nicht abgesprochen werden; aber ob sie auch Gefühl hat? Ich fürchte, nein. Sie wird wohl sein wie die meisten Künstler: alles nur Stil und keine echte Innerlichkeit. Sie würde sich kaum für andere opfern. Sie denkt vor allem an die Musik, und man weiß ja, wie egoistisch die Künste sind. Aber zugeben muß man, sie hat einige schöne Töne in ihrer Stimme. Schade, daß sie gar keinen Sinn haben, nichts ausdrücken und ohne praktischen Wert sind.« Und er ging auf sein Zimmer und legte sich auf sein schmales Feldbett und fing an, an seine Liebe zu denken; bald war er eingeschlafen.

Und als der Mond in den Himmeln schien, flog die Nachtigall zu dem Rosenstrauch und preßte ihre Brust gegen den Dorn. Die ganze Nacht sang sie, die Brust gegen den Dorn gepreßt, und der kalte kristallene Mond neigte sich herab und lauschte. Die ganze Nacht sang sie, und der Dorn drang tiefer und tiefer in ihre Brust, und ihr Lebensblut sickerte weg von ihr.

Zuerst sang sie von dem Werden der Liebe in dem Herzen eines Knaben und eines Mädchens. Und an der Spitze des Rosenstrauchs erblühte eine herrliche Rose, Blatt reihte sich an Blatt wie Lied auf Lied. Erst war sie bleich wie der Nebel, der über dem Fluß hängt, bleich wie die Füße des Morgens und silbern wie die Flügel des Dämmers. Wie das Schattenbild einer Rose in einem Silberspiegel, wie das Schattenbild einer Rose im Teiche, so war die Rose, die aufblühte an der Spitze des Rosenstocks.

Der aber rief der Nachtigall zu, daß sie sich fester noch gegen den Dorn presse. »Drück fester, kleine Nachtigall«, rief er, »sonst bricht der Tag an, bevor die Rose vollendet ist.«

Und so drückte die Nachtigall sich fester gegen den Dorn, und lauter und lauter wurde ihr Lied, denn sie sang nun von dem Erwachen der Leidenschaft in der Seele von Mann und Weib.

Und ein zartes Rot kam auf die Blätter der Rose, wie das Erröten auf das Antlitz des Bräutigams, wenn er die Lippen seiner Braut küßt. Aber der Dorn hatte ihr Herz noch nicht getroffen, und so blieb das Herz der Rose weiß, denn bloß einer Nachtigall Herzblut kann das Herz einer Rose färben. Und der Strauch rief der Nachtigall zu, daß sie sich fester noch gegen den Dorn drücke. »Drück fester, kleine Nachtigall«, rief er, »sonst ist es Tag, bevor die Rose vollendet ist.«

Und so drückte die Nachtigall sich fester gegen den Dorn, und der Dorn berührte ihr Herz, und ein heftiger Schmerz durchzuckte sie. Bitter, bitter war der Schmerz, und wilder, wilder wurde das Lied, denn sie sang nun von der Liebe, die der Tod verklärt, von der Liebe, die auch im Grabe nicht stirbt. Und die wundervolle Rose färbte sich rot wie die Rose des östlichen Himmels. Rot war der Gürtel ihrer Blätter, und rot wie ein Rubin war ihr Herz. Aber die Stimme der Nachtigall wurde schwächer, und ihre kleinen Flügel begannen zu flattern, und ein leichter Schleier kam über ihre Augen. Schwächer und schwächer wurde ihr Lied, und sie fühlte etwas in der Kehle.

Dann schluchzte sie noch einmal auf in letzten Tönen. Der weiße Mond hörte es, und er vergaß unterzugehen und verweilte am Himmel. Die rote Rose hörte es und zitterte ganz vor Wonne und öffnete ihre Blätter dem kühlen Morgenwind. Das Echo trug es in seine Purpurhöhle in den Bergen und weckte die schlafenden Schäfer aus ihren Träumen. Es schwebte über das Schilf am Fluß, und der trug die Botschaft dem Meere zu. »Sieh, sieh«, rief der Rosenstrauch, »nun ist die Rose fertig«; aber die Nachtigall gab keine Antwort, denn sie lag tot im hohen Gras, mit dem Dorn im Herzen.

Um Mittag öffnete der Student sein Fenster und blickte hinaus. »Was für ein Wunder und Glück«, rief er; »da ist eine rote Rose! Nie in meinem Leben habe ich eine solche Rose gesehen. Sie ist so schön, ich bin sicher, sie hat einen langen lateinischen Namen«; und er lehnte sich hinaus und pflückte sie. Dann setzte er seinen Hut auf und lief dem Professor ins Haus, mit der Rose in der Hand.

Des Professors Tochter saß in der Einfahrt und wand blaue Seide auf eine Spule, und ihr Hündchen lag ihr zu Füßen.

»Ihr sagtet, Ihr würdet mit mir tanzen, wenn ich Euch eine rote Rose brächte«, sagte der Student. »Hier ist die röteste Rose der Welt. Tragt sie heut abend an Eurem Herzen, und wenn wir zusammen tanzen, wird sie Euch erzählen, wie ich Euch liebe.«

Aber das Mädchen verzog den Mund. »Ich fürchte, sie paßt nicht zu meinem Kleid«, sprach sie; »und dann hat mir auch der Neffe des Kammerherrn echte Juwelen geschickt, und das weiß doch jeder, daß Juwelen mehr wert sind als Blumen.«

»Wahrhaftig, Ihr seid sehr undankbar«, rief der Student gereizt; und er warf die Rose auf die Straße, wo sie in die Gosse fiel, und ein Wagenrad ging darüber. »Undankbar?« sagte das Mädchen. »Ich will Euch was sagen: Ihr seid sehr ungezogen – und dann: wer seid Ihr eigentlich? Ein Student, nichts weiter. Ich glaube, Ihr habt nicht einmal Silberschnallen an den Schuhen, wie des Kammerherrn Neffe.« Und sie stand auf und ging ins Haus.

»Wie dumm ist doch die Liebe«, sagte sich der Student, als er fortging; »sie ist nicht halb so nützlich wie die Logik, denn sie beweist gar nichts und spricht einem immer von Dingen, die nicht geschehen werden, und läßt einen Dinge glauben, die nicht wahr sind. Sie ist wirklich etwas ganz Unpraktisches, und da in unserer Zeit das Praktische alles ist, so gehe ich wieder zur Philosophie und studiere Metaphysik.« So ging er wieder auf sein Zimmer und holte ein großes staubiges Buch hervor und begann zu lesen.