de-en  bpb_predictive_policing
Predictive Policing: On the Trail of Future Crime.

Hopefully we will be spared having our streets patrolled by Robocops in future.

In the movie by the same name from 1987 the police was completely privatized and corrupt.

On a digital map, the high risk areas, the so-called hot spots, are marked in red: in that way the police knows were criminals will strike next - and will be able to send their patrols to possible scenes of crimes.

This saves time and resources and ideally prevents crime before it happens.

Sounds futuristic?

This kind of fighting crime is called predictive policing, and is meanwhile supporting policemen all over the world in their hunt for criminals.

Algorithms sift through heaps of data, search for patterns and calculate which crimes could happen where.

Depending on the software and settings used, different sources of information are included in the evaluations: such as criminal cases from the past, but also socio-demographic data, creditworthiness, weather forecasts, traffic data, and in some cases also current information from social networks.

Predictive policing software is already widely spread in the US; and other countries like England, South Africa, Brazil, Switzerland or the Netherlands also rely on data-driven investigations.

In Germany the State Offices of Criminal Investigation so far experiment mainly with issue-related software like "Predpol" which is to prevent apartment break-ins and and which tries to predict the future targets of gangs of burglars.

An amplifier of prejudices.

In the US, but also in England police units already use software based on individual-related data.

In case of emergency calls in cities like Fresno in California the software "Beware", for example, calculates whether the security forces have to expect to encounter people with a criminal records or who own fire arms.

Since 2013, the Chicago Police has been keeping a so-called "Strategic Subjects List" (SSL) consisiting at present of about 1,000 people who are particularly at risk of being involved in a shooting - als victims or perpetrators.

The citizens classified at-risk are visited by the police and forewarned in order to prevent the projection to come true.

Social programs also are to cushion people at risk.

But in a recent study the RAND Corporation, a think tank which, among others, advises the US Armed Forces critizes the methodology: "People who are listed on SSL of being especially at risk, are not less frequent or more often victims than those in our control group," the analysts say.

On the other hand, the potential culprits on the list are at a higher risk of being arrested because they are already on the police's watchlist.

Anstatt Zielpersonen wie angekündigt mit Sozialmaßnahmen zu unterstützen, um mögliche Verbrechen mit Prävention zu verhindern, würde die Liste eher nach Schießereien oder anderen Verbrechen zur Suche nach Tätern herangezogen.

Dazu fehle eine Einbettung der Software in eine Gesamtstrategie: Die Polizisten würden kein ausreichendes Training erhalten, das ihnen vermittelt, was die Liste genau bedeutet und wie sie sie für die Polizeiarbeit nutzen sollen.

Chicago Police argues that RAND Corporation only evaluated the 2013 first release of SSL and not its advanced version.

Yet the study brings basic issues of data-based police work to light.

Predictive Policing can amplify existing prejudices and discrimination.

When for example the police patrols certain quarters like deprived areas more frequently it record more crimes there which then again receive a stronger weight in future prognises.

Raids and checks in poorer areas confirm assumptions while arms and drug deales in affluent areas are less frequently caught because raids and street checks happen less frequently there.

Racial Profiling as well, the tendency to check on for example black people or citizens with a migration background more often is reflected in these data.

Nach dem Tod des 25-jährigen Afro-Amerikaners Freddie Gray etwa, der nach seiner Festnahme in Polizeigewahrsam starb, ermittelte das US-Justizministerium gegen die Polizei von Baltimore.

Dem Ermittlungsbericht zufolge ist Diskriminierung durch die Polizei in Baltimore massiv.

Black citizens often are stopped above average, get arrested and sentenced more often.

At the same time the relationship between the police and black citizens was so bad that they did not report many crimes at all.

Police routines and attitudes also influence how the algorithm works - for future crimes are derived from data which are incomplete and can therefore be discriminating.

Human rights organizations liek the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) criticize that crime related data are inherently warped.

Still no proven success.

Police units often see such software as a tool that supports their work and operational planning.

But independent science-based studies about the use and success of Predictive Policing do not exist as yet.

Predictive policing software is often developed by organisations, partly in collaboration with universities.

Present studies come mostly from these companies who are interested in marketing their products.

One idea in order to create more transparency with Predictive Policing is the establishment of independent arbitration panels in which technology experts as well as people of the civil society participate, and which is to allow a better check of the workings and use of police softwar to avoid for example discrimination.

Dazu müsste allerdings auch transparent sein, welche Variablen zu den Berechnungen von Gefahrenzonen und Verdächtigen herangezogen werden und wie genau der Algorithmus funktioniert.

Auch bei der "Strategic Subject List" aus Chicago sind die detaillierten Variablen nicht öffentlich, nach denen die Risiko-Liste zusammengestellt wird.

An additional challenge is data protection.

Which data are incorporated into the calculations?

Who can access the data, where and for how long are they stored?

But police authorities give up to now only dosed insights into the used data and processes - and the manufacturers of Predictive Policing Software regard their algorithms as trade secret.
unit 1
Predictive Policing: Dem Verbrechen der Zukunft auf der Spur.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 2
Dass in Zukunft Robocops unsere Straßen patrouillieren, bleibt uns hoffentlich erspart.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 3
Im gleichnamigen Film aus dem Jahr 1987 ist die Polizei komplett privatisiert und korrupt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 5
So spart man Zeit und Ressourcen und verhindert im Idealfall Verbrechen, bevor sie passieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 6
Klingt futuristisch?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 12
Ein Verstärker von Vorurteilen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 13
In den USA, aber auch in England setzen Polizeieinheiten Software bereits personenbezogen ein.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 17
Auch soziale Programme sollen die gefährdeten Personen auffangen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 23
Dennoch offenbart die Studie Einblick in grundsätzliche Probleme datengestützter Polizeiarbeit.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 24
unit 30
unit 34
Noch kein nachgewiesener Erfolg.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 42
Eine weitere Herausforderung ist der Datenschutz.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 43
Welche Daten fließen in die Berechnungen ein?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 44
Wem stehen die Daten zur Verfügung, wo und wie lange werden sie gespeichert?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 44  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 43  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 42  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 37  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 35  1 month, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 5  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 4  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 7  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 12  1 month, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 16  1 month, 1 week ago

Predictive Policing: Dem Verbrechen der Zukunft auf der Spur.

Dass in Zukunft Robocops unsere Straßen patrouillieren, bleibt uns hoffentlich erspart.

Im gleichnamigen Film aus dem Jahr 1987 ist die Polizei komplett privatisiert und korrupt.

Auf einer digitalen Karte sind die Hochrisikogebiete, die so genannten Hot Spots, rot markiert: So weiß die Polizei, wo Täter/-innen bald zuschlagen werden – und kann ihre Patrouillen gezielt zu möglichen Tatorten schicken.

So spart man Zeit und Ressourcen und verhindert im Idealfall Verbrechen, bevor sie passieren.

Klingt futuristisch?

Predictive Policing, vorausschauende Polizeiarbeit, nennt sich diese Art der Kriminalitätsbekämpfung und unterstützt Polizisten inzwischen weltweit bei der Verbrecherjagd.

Algorithmen durchforsten Datenberge, suchen nach Mustern und berechnen, welche Verbrechen wo auftreten könnten.

Je nach verwendeter Software und Einstellungen fließen in die Bewertungen unterschiedliche Informationsquellen ein: etwa Kriminalfälle aus der Vergangenheit, aber auch soziodemografische Daten, Bonität, Wetterprognosen, Verkehrsdaten, zum Teil auch aktuelle Informationen aus sozialen Netzwerken.

In den USA ist Predictive Policing Software bereits weit verbreitet, auch andere Länder wie England, Südafrika, Brasilien, die Schweiz oder die Niederlande setzen auf datengestützte Ermittlungen.

In Deutschland experimentieren die Landeskriminalämter bisher vor allem mit sachbezogener Software wie „Predpol“, die Wohnungseinbrüche verhindern soll und versucht, die nächsten Ziele von Einbrecherbanden zu prognostizieren.

Ein Verstärker von Vorurteilen.

In den USA, aber auch in England setzen Polizeieinheiten Software bereits personenbezogen ein.

Bei Notrufen in Städten wie Fresno in Kalifornien berechnet die Software „Beware“ etwa, ob die Sicherheitskräfte am Einsatzort mit einem Gegenüber mit Vorstrafenregister oder einer Schusswaffe rechnen müssen.

Die Polizei von Chicago führt seit 2013 eine sogenannte „Strategic Subjects List“ (SSL) mit aktuell etwa 1000 Personen, die besonders gefährdet sind, an einer Schießerei beteiligt zu sein — als Opfer oder Täter.

Die als Risikopersonen eingestuften Bürger werden von der Polizei besucht und vorgewarnt, das soll verhindern, dass die Prognose eintritt.

Auch soziale Programme sollen die gefährdeten Personen auffangen.

Doch in einer neuen Studie kritisiert die RAND Corporation, eine Denkfabrik die unter anderem die US-Streitkräfte berät, die Methodik:

“Personen, die auf der SSL als besonders gefährdet gelistet sind, werden nicht seltener oder häufiger zum Opfer als unsere Kontrollgruppe“, so die Analysten.

Die potentiellen Täter auf der Liste dagegen hätten ein höheres Risiko, festgenommen zu werden, weil sie sich bereits im Visier der Polizei befinden.

Anstatt Zielpersonen wie angekündigt mit Sozialmaßnahmen zu unterstützen, um mögliche Verbrechen mit Prävention zu verhindern, würde die Liste eher nach Schießereien oder anderen Verbrechen zur Suche nach Tätern herangezogen.

Dazu fehle eine Einbettung der Software in eine Gesamtstrategie: Die Polizisten würden kein ausreichendes Training erhalten, das ihnen vermittelt, was die Liste genau bedeutet und wie sie sie für die Polizeiarbeit nutzen sollen.

Die Polizei von Chicago argumentiert, dass die RAND Corporation nur die Anfangsversion der "Strategic Subject List" von 2013 ausgewertet habe und diese weiterentwickelt worden sei.

Dennoch offenbart die Studie Einblick in grundsätzliche Probleme datengestützter Polizeiarbeit.

Predictive Policing kann wie ein Verstärker für bestehende Vorurteile und Diskriminierung wirken.

Wenn die Polizei etwa verstärkt in bestimmten Vierteln wie sozialen Brennpunkten patrouilliert, erfasst sie dort mehr Kriminalitätsmeldungen, die dann wieder stärker gewichtet in Zukunftsprognosen einfließen.

Razzien oder Kontrollen in ärmeren Viertel bestätigen Annahmen, während Waffen- und Drogendealer in wohlhabenden Vierteln seltener auffliegen, weil dort etwa weniger Razzien und Straßenkontrollen stattfinden.

Auch Racial Profiling, die Tendenz, dass etwa schwarze Menschen oder Bürger mit Migrationshintergrund öfter kontrolliert werden, spiegelt sich in den Daten wieder.

Nach dem Tod des 25-jährigen Afro-Amerikaners Freddie Gray etwa, der nach seiner Festnahme in Polizeigewahrsam starb, ermittelte das US-Justizministerium gegen die Polizei von Baltimore.

Dem Ermittlungsbericht zufolge ist Diskriminierung durch die Polizei in Baltimore massiv.

Schwarze Bewohner wurden überdurchschnittlich oft angehalten, häufiger verhaftet und verurteilt.

Auf der anderen Seite war das Verhältnis zwischen Polizei und schwarzen Bürgern so schlecht, dass sie viele Verbrechen gar nicht meldeten.

Polizeiroutinen und Einstellungen beeinflussen so die Berechnungen des Algorithmus – denn zukünftige Verbrechen werden aus Daten abgeleitet, die unvollständig sind und deshalb diskriminierend wirken können.

Menschenrechtsorganisationen wie die American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) kritisieren, dass Kriminalitätsbezogene Daten grundsätzlich verzerrt seien.

Noch kein nachgewiesener Erfolg.

Polizeieinheiten sehen eine solche Software oft als Tool, das ihre Arbeit und die Einsatzplanung unterstützt.

Unabhängige, fundierte wissenschaftliche Studien zum Einsatz und zum Erfolg von Predictive Policing stehen aber noch aus.

Predictive Policing Software wird oft von Unternehmen, die auch zum Teil mit Universitäten zusammenarbeiten, entwickelt.

Die bisherigen Studien stammen meistens von diesen Unternehmen, die ein Interesse daran haben, ihre Produkte zu vermarkten.

Eine Idee für mehr Transparenz beim Predictive Policing ist die Einrichtung unabhängiger Schiedsgerichte, an denen Technologie-Experten/-innen sowie Vertreter/-innen der Zivilgeschafft beteiligt sind, und die die Funktionsweise und den Einsatz der Polizeisoftware besser kontrollieren sollen, um etwa Diskriminierung zu vermeiden.

Dazu müsste allerdings auch transparent sein, welche Variablen zu den Berechnungen von Gefahrenzonen und Verdächtigen herangezogen werden und wie genau der Algorithmus funktioniert.

Auch bei der "Strategic Subject List" aus Chicago sind die detaillierten Variablen nicht öffentlich, nach denen die Risiko-Liste zusammengestellt wird.

Eine weitere Herausforderung ist der Datenschutz.

Welche Daten fließen in die Berechnungen ein?

Wem stehen die Daten zur Verfügung, wo und wie lange werden sie gespeichert?

Doch die Polizeibehörden geben bisher nur dosierte Einblicke in die verwendeten Daten und Abläufe – und die Hersteller von Predictive Policing Software betrachten ihre Algorithmen als Geschäftsgeheimnis.