de-en  Siegfried Bergengruen: Die Puppen des Maharadscha - 14. Kapitel - Im Flugzeug nach Indien
Chapter 14 - On the Aeroplane to India

In the evening, a few days after the events portrayed, Erwin Gerardi was sitting on the terrace of the Bristol Hotel in Nizza with his friend, Engineer, Francois Courton, listening to the tones of the excellent health-resort music, when a waiter came up to him discretely and handed over a telegram that had just arrived. Courton did not pay much attention to this incident, for, considering Gerardi's widespread business operations, receiving a telegram or express letter was a normal occurrence that seldom brought with it anything unusual.

This time however, it did seem to be something special, because Erwin suddenly and unexpectedly dropped the telegram and turned very pale.

"Something unpleasant?" Francois inquired disconcerted.

Erwin only answered "Read!", shoving the paper towards him. Simultaneously he signalled to a waiter that he wished to pay.

The telegram contained the following words: " Come immediately! Madame Ivonne vanished! Suspect crime!

Louis." - "Gosh!" exclaimed Francois involuntarily. Isn't the old coot seeing ghosts in the final stages? Erwin got up:"It's possible and to be hoped! Nevertheless we can't waste time. I'm taking the next plane. Will you accompany me...?" Francois nodded and followed his friend , who was proceeding hurriedly to the car, which brought them in a few minutes to the airport. The next plane to Marseille left in a quarter of an hour. They had just enough time to buy their tickets and to take their seats when the propeller began to whirr.

At midnight they arrived in Marseille. The weather was very nice and thus the streets still rather busy. Passing the Café Glacier they heard loud jazz music. Erwin was overwhelmed by a bitter feeling at the sound of these rhythms. It occurred to him how a year and a half ago he had met Ivonne Martinet at this spot and they had then together withdrawn the five million francs from the Bank de Commerce that became the basis of their happiness. Now perhaps, he would never again see his beautiful wife, whom he truly loved.

The car stopped in front of the Villa Geradi. On the ground floor everything was dark, but on the first floor some windows were still illuminated. Without a word the two friends went up. Even Francois could not help feeling a great uneasiness and was extremely anxious about what they would find out.

Old Louis met them on the stairs. He looked very upset and agitated. His hands were shaking so badly that they had to help him hang up their coats. Then they entered Erwin's study and the servant had to tell them.

It was in the evening when Ivonne had sent him away, having returned home just after midnight. Even at the garden gate, the loud howling and barking of the wolfhound Jim, which had a bed downstairs in the hallway, had gotten his attention. When he opened the front door, the dog rushed toward him whimpering, grabbed him by the coattails and tried to drag him behind itself. When he did not immediately react to this, the dog ran ahead and began to scratch at the door which led to the corridor that ran the entire length of the ground floor. Apparently, it had already been busying itself with this for a lengthy time because the finish showed damaged spots.

Thereupon Louis opened the corridor door and let the dog out. He ran with his nose to the floor right up to the room in which the black trunk was stored and continued his scratching here with increased vehemence. As Louis noticed this, he calmed down again immediately, because he knew that in the meantime the trunk had arrived. He attributed the dog's strange behaviour to having heard the piece of luggage being carried in and sensing the presence of strangers, which had agitated him. With great difficulty and the use of coercion, he took Jim back into the hallway, chained him up and lay himself down to rest.

On the following morning, when the trunk was picked up to be taken to the steamer, he noticed that the animal reacted immediately, howling loudly and making huge efforts to bite through the chain and leap at the carriers. Nothing like this had ever happened before, so that Louis already started to think that perhaps the wild stories which had been circulating about the trunk and its owner were not completely unfounded after all. However at that time it did not occur to him to connect these speculations with his mistress' travel.

This suspicion first arose in him a few days later when he went for a walk along the quay and was quite disconcerted to notice Afru's yacht anchored undisturbed at its mooring. For Ivonne had said that she and Afru would sail with the yacht to Ajaccio and from there call at Nizza, where they would pick up Erwin. That obviously did not correspond to the facts. He immediately went to the hotel where Afru usually resided and enquired as to the whereabouts of the Indian. He was told that several days previously Afru had quite suddenly left for Paris at night, in the company of his Chinese secretary.

"Do you know for sure, that there was no lady with him?" the old man now asked in disbelief.

The clerk who informed him pressed an electric button and had the boy that came running call the porter, who had organised Afru's luggage to be taken to the train. He came and could confirm with certainty that Afru and Jen-Tsu-Tai had entered their compartment alone and had not once come into contact with any lady at the station.

In connection with the dog's behaviour, it suddenly occurred to Louis, who had been vainly pondering over the whole affair, that Ivonne may have fallen victim to a crime. Immediately afterwards he had sent that ominous telegram, which had been delivered to Erwin in the hotel in Bristol.

"Did you inform the police?" was Erwin's first question.

Louis could affirm that. He had been driving directly from the telegraph office to the prefecture, and there he had put on record everything he knew. Two hours later, several detectives had been in the villa, had inspected everything exactly, and had then taken him again to the prefect in person, to whom he had to tell everything down to the last detail. So it was to be hoped that everything humanly possible had already been arranged in order to save Ivonne.

Erwin phoned the prefecture immediately. The prefect had expected the call and came personally to the phone.

"Thank the Lord you're there." he shouted pleased. "My whole hope rested on your speedy coming!" - "Is there any hope that my wife will be found?" - "Of course! 'I am even firmly convinced that she is safe and sound on board the 'Viktor Emmanuele' and steaming her way to India." - "Can a police-search of the ship be ordered by telegraph?" - "I have already done everything imaginable, but unfortunately without any success. The Viktor Emmanuele is currently either in the Suez Canal or already in the Red Sea, that is to say, in every respect still under British influence. However, since the ship belongs to Italy, and England - just for political reasons - strives to avoid any friction with Mussolini, the British Counsel cannot be swayed to set up an intervention by English authorities in Athens or Bombay based on my arguments, which he considers too insecure." - "So what else can be done to disposses the robbers of their quarry before it's too late?" - "It depends on whether you shy away from any financial sacrifice!?" "Not at all! Even if my entire fortune would be destroyed!" - "Very good! - Under these circumstances, I recommend that you immediately contact an aircraft factory to purchase an aircraft and find some courageous and reliable people to accompany you on a trip to India. All passport formalities as well as the issuing of powers of attorney on the part of the French police authority I will naturally take over for immediate completion. I presume that you will be able to fly tomorrow morning and will meanwhile have Afru arrested in Paris." Erwin, after several words of farewell and thanks, hung up the receiver and fell into a club chair, exhausted and dejected.

"What's wrong with you?" asked Francois full of sympathy.

" It's all too slow for me, you know. - Departure not before tomorrow morning. Who will guarantee that we'll arrive to India without an incident? If the steamer arrives in Bombay earlier than I do, Ivonne is as good as lost!" - " It does not have to be that way. - Since the English police do not want to interfere, we will telegraph the French consulate in Bombay and ask for careful observation of the passengers and luggage going ashore!" - "That's a thought! - Now the second question, where do I get a plane so quickly that is powerful enough to undertake the enormous journey, and where do I find companions who are willing to take part in this, after all, a quite adventurous and not at all harmless undertaking?" - "Nothing is simpler than that! Regarding the plane, I'm notifying a collegue in Paris. There is now a whole range of aircraft there, which are load-tested and ready to take off for the now current flights to and from America. It won't be very hard to buy one of them. As for companions, I have already quietly made a choice which hopefully is to your liking. They are Dr. Renee, Juffo and me!" - "I don't know how I shall thank you for not leaving me alone in this situation. I'll never, ever forget you for that!" Erwin got up and reached out to his friend, who took it and shook it vigorously.

"Don't mention it! You know that I've always had such a penchant for the extraordinary, here is an opportunity for once to use its surplus powers to good effect. - So, to finish up. I'll go to my office and wire Paris. Meanwhile you inform the Doctor and Juffo." *The flight is scheduled for seven o'clock tomorrow morning. Already at six o'clock the machine should arrive from Paris. It had been agreed to meet in the prefecture, receive the passports and police authorizations and then drive out to the airport together.

The night passed for all participants of the flight - Renee and Juffo had agreed without hesitation - with feverish preparations. It was not only simply the crossing to Bombay, but possibly a longer stay in India, since it had to be reckoned that Ivonne was abducted into the interior of the country and could only be rescued by overcoming big obstacles. On the advice of the prefect, it had been decided to officially pretend to be a hunting party traveling around the world, and the papers had also been issued in this sense. Thus, the local Indian authorities wouldn't get suspicious.

The plane arrived at five to six from Paris and immediately received its final inspection and motor check by a group of technicans and engineers. Meanwhile, Juffo, who was temporarily alone, carried all the luggage: suitcases, tents and rifles inside the spacious cabin, which was outfitted for four passengers.

At a quarter to seven, the car of the prefect, who had not allowed himself personally to be taken to accompany the gentlemen, drove up and stopped next to the body of the giant bird, which trembled and swayed as the mechanics climbed up and down.

At the last minute, a terrible message had arrived at the Prefecture from Paris. Afru had escaped! At first, the police officers had rung the bell and pounded on the door of his villa in Versailles for some time in vain, and finally opened it forcibly to find nothing inside the house other than the somewhat chaotically scattered remains of a hurried departure, which pointed to an escape. It appeared that this time the Indians had disappeared for good because even the servants' luggage, the cars and all the petrol supplies had been taken with them.

"You must expect the worst," said the prefect very seriously to Erwin, after he had read to him the telegram from Paris. "I assume that Afru is already on his way to India and that his earlier or simultaneous arrival might not only cause a failure of your plans, but possibly - which only heaven may prevent - even the death of your wife in its wake! They got acquainted with the pilot, a former Russian fighter pilot, Lieutenant Sergei Gorbunov, instructed him about the situation and then boarded the plane. A last handshake, last wishes and farewell words, then the engine began to roar. The propellers were pivoted and began their rolling music. The whole plane shook and trembled as if in furious excitement. Then it set itself in motion with a short jerk, hurried over the smooth terrain at lightning speed and rose into the air without effort in a sloping, increasingly ascending line. After only two minutes it had vanished in a south easternly direction.

Italy and the Adriatic Sea passed by underneath them. At noon they were floating over the kingdom of South Slavia. The rugged, snow and glacier-covered peaks of the Balkan and Rhodope mountains raised their heads in threatening proximity underneath them. Eventually they passed into a green, fertile plain, crossed by two wide rivers that seemed to meet in the distance. Then more hills. On the right an immense body of water. After half an hour, the same scene on the left, then there was suddenly a confusion of yellowish cube-shaped buildings and mosques adorned with minarets. Straight through this, a glittering blue street connecting the bodies of water on the right and left. Constantinople! The Bosporus, carrying the Black Sea floods into the Marmara.

The propeller droned on without interrupting its monotonous song. It slowly got dark. The ball of the sun hung like a glowing purple teardrop in the brown-violet haze of the western sky, which was bordered by the jagged peaks of a rocky mountain range. Francois Courton replaced Lieutenant Gorbunow at the controls, who immediately stretched out in the engineer's comfortable leather armchair and fell asleep without saying a word. Below, bathed in a strange, pale twilight, the stark mountains of Asia minor slid past. Then suddenly and without warning, darkness descended. Now Renee and Juffo also were sleeping. As the only person awake, Erwin could not stand remaining in the cabin. He went to the cockpit and sat down next to Francois. Although he knew that here too, due to the roar of the propeller, a conversation was almost impossible, he felt more comfortable in this environment than in the passenger compartment in semi-darkness and filled with the haze of the sleeping men.

Around midnight they crossed Armenia and at the break of dawn they landed on the airfield of the German Äro-Lloyd at the Persian capital of Tehran to fill the petrol tanks and check the engines.

After a two-hour break, in which the five men tried in vain to get some agility back into their stiffened limbs, sighing, they boarded their plane again to entrust themselves anew to the realm of the air. This time, however, they did not fly south as in the beginning, but headed directly south over the Persian Sea to the coast of the Sultanate of Oman. This change of course was caused by a radio dispatch for Erwin that arrived in Tehran from France, in which the Prefect of Marseilles told him that the Viktor Emmanuele was in the Red Sea off of Aden.

While the weather during the flight had been really marvellous so far, yet towering masses of clouds in the west showed that Asia's nature was unwilling to let the five strange men into its interior without a battle. The higher the sun rose the more threateningly the sky clouded. Occasionally, harsh lightning streaked and was accompanied by deafening thunderclaps. Gorbunow pulled back on the stick to let the plane increase its altitude. Soon they were shrouded in gloomy clouds, the mountain chains of Farsistan vanished, and finally the blue sky blazed again. However, nothing could been seen of the earth as far as the eye could see, a thundering cloud chaos billowed in the depths, its bulky, grotesquely shaped waves rushing wildly against each other. Additionally to that a considerable storm was dominating this height, which could easily divert it from its course, since the orientation on earth failed.

When it was about five o'clock in the afternoon, Gorbunow explained according to his calculation they should have been above the Sultanate of Oman or the Arabian Desert for a long time now, and he would therefore go down through the clouds to a minor altitude for orientation reasons. Moreover, the thunderstorm seemed to have subsided, the violet bronze color of the clouds had been lost and had given way to a uniform, impenetrable gray.

Gorbunov cut off the engine, the sound of the propellers stopped, and in a slow gliding flight they began to sink deeper and deeper while the passing air whistling along the walls of the cockpit and roared along the cabin. Torrents of rain suddenly began and drumming, washed over the metal hull of the cabin. Then finally, as if through a thick veil, the outlines of a forested mountain range gradually became more and more visible.

They got maps out and tried to orientate themselves. According to these, in the eastern part of Arabia there was only a medium-sized mountain range on the coast of Osman, but everywhere else there was a vast sandy desert. They descended even further and then flew sharply to the west to reach the edge of the mountains. But in vain. At times they saw elongated valleys with small villages, where people gathered in droves in front of their crooked huts to stare up at the buzzing giant bird. But nowhere did they detect even the slightest indication of a desert-like landscape.

"We aren't in Arabia at all!" Courton finally decided, when they had already followed the same direction for one hour, without coming to any other result.

"The storm has carried off us to the east and we are nearby the Central Asian mountains. These villages didn't look like Arab settlements to me from the very beginning." He wanted to continue speaking, but stopped and pointed to two small holes that had suddenly formed with a grinding noise at the bottom of the floor and at the top of the hull, through which meddlesome raindrops immediately began to seep in.

Erwin was the first to realize what it was.

"We're being fired at!" he cried excitedly.

As if to confirm his words, a window pane burst loudly and shattered, showering the occupants of the cabin with a hail of glass splinters.

Gorbunov now also seemed to have noticed something, because the thunder of the engine suddenly intensified, became deep and booming, and the earth began to fall away. Through their binoculars they saw a crowd of men on horseback along a road in an insane hurry blasting and firing their long rifles into the air. They were probably soldiers of some Asian small state who sensed an act of espionage in the remarkably low altitude flight of the plane.

They flew and flew. It was getting dark. Gorbunow and Courton changed their places as in the evening before. Erwin sat motionless in his armchair, although he was tortured by a desperate restlessness. What if they didn't even intercept the Viktor Emmanuele! But at least they had to arrive earlier in Bombay than the steamship.

Suddenly everyone was startled. Even the weary Gorbunov, who had fallen into a death-like sleep . The engine had failed. Once, twice it snored up asthmatically, then there was a bad rattling sound lasting a long time and then it became completely quiet. Only the singing of the air!

Gorbunov jumped up and hurried into the cockpit. The other men pushed in after him. Everyone knew that something bad must have happened.

"We're out of gas ... !" Francois Courton explained, shrugging his shoulders and pointed to a gauge with the pointer at zero.

"That's impossible!" screamed Gorbunov. I filled all the tanks in Tehran! This quantity should last until tomorrow evening!" - "Oh, yes, it should ... if we had not been shot. I am convinced that a bullet pierced the fuel line and in this way the contents of the tanks leaked slowly, but with a cruel certainty!" A silence lasting several minutes occurred. Everyone felt that the engineer had to be right, because there was absolutely no other explanation.

Courton had taken his place at the controls again and stared down at the earth approaching with great speed. Fortunately, the clouds had separated after dark, and the light of the moon dominated the terrain, even if quite uncertainly.

"Setting down!" Courton suddenly shouted, warning the others, and made a desperate effort to maintain control of the plane. Close under the wheels the peaks of extensive fir forests became visible.

Just keep the plane in the air until a clearing came, just so long! Then everything was saved! - But the clearing didn't come. All of a sudden there was a terrible impact, so terrible that all the occupants were thrown out of their chairs against the leather-cushioned cabin walls. Then a crackling, rattling and splintering could be heard, and the machine stood still. To the right and left of the windows, however, the crowns of the trees in which the plane had gotten stuck lay down like countless fingers of green ghostly hands.

Erwin and Gorbunov wanted out immediately. But Renee and Courton vigorously advised against it.

"There's no point in you wandering the woods at night now and exposing yourself to all sorts of contingencies," Courton said. "We stay in the cabin for the time being, make ourselves as comfortable as possible and sleep until sunrise. Then we want to look further." As bad as the whole incident was, it turned out the next morning that it could have turned out even more unpleasant. Because the machine had miraculously remained intact except for a few cracks in the wings. Nowhere a defect. Even the propellers had pushed themselves so favorably into the branches that they could hope to get the airplane on the ground completely intact.

They split into two divisions Erwin and Gorbunov went in search of a human settlement to seek help while the remaining men were to guard the stuck aircraft.

The two scouts wandered around for hours. Further and further they moved away from the landing place, higher and higher the glowing sun rose. Finally at noon they noticed a few mud huts, in whose surroundings shaggy horses grazed. Big dogs rushed loudly barking at the arrivals. Then several untrustworthy looking men in long brown coats appeared and strolled towards them, calling the dogs off.

"Passport ... Passport" was the first thing they demanded with lively hand movements. Apparently, it had to do with a border guard or gendarme station. When they had received the desired papers, they withdrew for a long consultation, whispered mysteriously with each other, and finally explained through gestures that couldn't be misunderstood that the gentlemen had to stay until the passports were viewed by some "Pan Inspector". Gorbunov tried to make them understand in Russian that this would not work under any circumstances since they couldn't lose any time, but on the contrary, would need help getting their plane back on the ground. But people didn't let their decision dissuade them. The plane should indeed be taken down and transported to a comfortable take-off place, but until the Pan Inspector came, the gentlemen would have to be patient.

When was the arrival of the officer to be expected then?

Well, in a week or two, at most!

Erwin was on the verge of despair. - A week or two. Then it could be too late. Until then Afru was safe there and made sure that Ivonne disappeared secretly. Neither petitions nor threats alone helped. He and Gorbunov were locked up in a hut and in the evening the three other gentlemen who were taken into custody in the meantime were added.

Endlessly the days went by. No inspector was seen. When one asked, there was only the laconic answer: "He will come soon. There is still time!" When the second week was running out and there was still no prospect of liberation, Erwin decided to bribe one of the Afghan border guards and fly away secretly with his help. Gorbunov, who was able to communicate with the natives in case of need thanks to his Russian language skills, conducted the negotiations. At first the man refused, but then, when he saw the cash money, he became more amenable and promised he would arrange on the following night to bring gasoline and a technician from the nearby town of Khash.

That night was very dark, which was very beneficial to the escape. Without the sleeping guards noticing anything, the men lifted a window with the help of some tools that the Afghan had given them, and hurried to the launch site. The technician had already arrived with the gasoline. In great haste with the light of a few dazzling lanterns, they set about soldering the perforated pipe and filling the tanks. After midnight everything was finally ready. Gorbunov climbed into the cockpit and started the engine. The electric interior lighting gleamed, the cabin was boarded and the doors slammed shut. Immediately afterwards the plane began to roll and rose into the air after a few seconds. It went on in incredible speed to the south.

In the afternoon Gorbunow landed at the Bombay airport. Erwin rented a car and drove straight to the French consulate. There he was informed that the Viktor Emmanuele had arrived in Bombay the day before and that a black trunk, as described by Erwin, had actually been brought ashore. As far as had been observed, he had been transported away in a luxury car of the Maharajah of Sukentala in the evening by the northern route.

Erwin thanked him and drove back to the airfield. There he shared with his friends everything that he had experienced. It was decided, without stopping in Bombay, immediately to continue the flight to the border of Nepal, where the Raja palace of Sukentala was situated on the bank of the river Gandak, and not to rest until the whereabouts and fate of Ivonne had been investigated.

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-puppen-des-maharadscha-9072/15
unit 1
Kapitel 14 - Im Flugzeug nach Indien.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 5
»Etwas Unangenehmes?« erkundigte sich Francois befremdet.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 6
»Lies!« antwortete Erwin nur und schob ihm das Blatt zu.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 7
Gleichzeitig winkte er einem Ober, um zu zahlen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 8
Die Depesche enthielt folgende Worte: »Sofort kommen!
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 9
Frau Ivonne verschwunden!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 10
Vermute Verbrechen!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 11
Louis.« - »Donnerwetter!« entfuhr es Francois unwillkürlich.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 12
»Sieht der alte Kauz am Ende nicht Gespenster?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 13
!« Erwin erhob sich: »Es ist möglich und zu hoffen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 14
Trotzdem dürfen wir keine Zeit verlieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 15
Ich benutze das nächste Flugzeug.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 17
Das nächste Flugzeug nach Marseille ging in einer Viertelstunde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 19
Um Mitternacht trafen sie in Marseille ein.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 20
Es war sehr schönes Wetter und die Straßen daher noch ziemlich belebt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 21
Als sie am Café Glacier vorüberfuhren, hörten sie laute Jazzmusik.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 22
Ein bitteres Gefühl überkam Erwin beim Klang dieser Rhythmen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 24
Nun würde er seine schöne Frau, die er aufrichtig liebte, vielleicht niemals wiedersehen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 25
Der Wagen hielt vor der Gerardischen Villa.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 26
Im Erdgeschoß war alles dunkel, aber im ersten Stock leuchteten noch einige Fenster.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 27
Wortlos gingen die beiden Freunde hinauf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 29
Auf der Treppe kam ihnen der alte Louis entgegen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 30
Er sah sehr mitgenommen und erregt aus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 31
Seine Hände zitterten so stark, daß sie ihm beim Aufhängen der Mäntel helfen mußten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 32
Dann betraten sie Erwins Studierzimmer und der Diener mußte erzählen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 33
Er war an dem Abend, als Ivonne ihn fortgeschickt hatte, erst nach Mitternacht heimgekehrt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 38
Darauf öffnete Louis die Korridortür und ließ den Hund hinaus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 48
Das entsprach nun jedenfalls nicht den Tatsachen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 51
»Wissen Sie genau, daß keine Dame mit ihm war?« fragte nun der alte Mann fassungslos.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 56
»Haben Sie die Polizei benachrichtigt?« war Erwins erste Frage.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 57
Louis konnte bejahen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 61
Erwin läutete die Präfektur sofort an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 62
Der Präfekt hatte den Anruf erwartet und kam selbst an den Apparat.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 63
»Gott sei Dank, daß Sie da sind!« rief er erfreut.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 68
?« - »Vor keinem!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 69
Und ginge dabei mein ganzes Vermögen in die Brüche!« - »Sehr gut!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 73
»Was ist dir?« erkundigte sich Francois voller Teilnahme.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 74
»Es geht mir alles zu langsam, weißt du.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 75
– Morgen früh erst Abfahrt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 76
Wer bürgt mir dafür, daß wir ohne Zwischenfall nach Indien gelangen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 80
Wegen des Flugzeuges verständige ich einen Kollegen in Paris.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 82
Es wird nicht übermäßig schwerhalten, eine davon zu erwerben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 86
»Keine Ursache!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 88
– Also, um zum Schluß zu kommen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 89
Ich gehe in mein Bureau und telegraphiere nach Paris.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 91
Bereits um sechs sollte die Maschine aus Paris eintreffen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 96
So konnten die örtlichen indischen Behörden kein Mißtrauen fassen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 100
In letzter Minute war auf der Präfektur noch eine schlimme Botschaft aus Paris eingelaufen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 101
Afru war entkommen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 106
Noch letztes Händeschütteln, letzte Wünsche und Abschiedsworte, dann begann der Motor zu bellen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 107
Die Propeller wurden eingeschwenkt und eröffneten ihre rollende Musik.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 108
Das ganze Flugzeug schüttelte und bebte wie in wütender Erregung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 110
Bereits nach zwei Minuten war es in südöstlicher Richtung verschwunden.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 111
* Italien und das Adriatische Meer zogen unter den Fliegern vorüber.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 112
Um Mittag schwebten sie über dem Königreich Südslawien.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 115
Dann neue Hügel.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 116
Rechts eine gewaltige Wasserfläche.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 118
Querdurch eine blaufunkelnde Straße, das rechte und linke Wasser verbindend.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 119
Konstantinopel!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 120
Der Bosporus, die Fluten des Schwarzen Meeres in die Marmara hinüberleitend.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 121
Weiter dröhnte der Propeller, ohne sein eintöniges Lied zu unterbrechen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 122
Es begann langsam zu dunkeln.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 125
Unten glitten Kleinasiens nackte Berge, in ein eigenartig fahles Zwielicht getaucht, vorüber.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 126
Dann plötzlich und unvermittelt brach die Dunkelheit herein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 127
Renee und Juffo schliefen nun ebenfalls.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 128
Erwin hielt es als einziger Wacher nicht mehr allein in der Kabine aus.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 129
Er ging nach vorne und setzte sich neben Francois.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 136
Je höher die Sonne stieg, um so drohender bewölkte sich der Himmel.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 137
Gelegentlich zuckten grelle Blitze und wurden von ohrenbetäubenden Donnerschlägen begleitet.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 138
Gorbunow setzte das Höhensteuer in Bewegung und ließ die Maschine steigen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 145
Regenfluten setzten plötzlich ein und überspülten trommelnd die Metallhaube der Kabine.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 147
Man holte Karten hervor und versuchte sich zu orientieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 149
unit 150
Aber vergeblich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 152
Aber nirgends bemerkten sie auch nur das geringste Anzeichen einer wüstenähnlichen Landschaft.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 156
Erwin erfaßte als erster, worum es sich handelte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 157
»Wir werden beschossen!« rief er erregt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 162
Sie flogen und flogen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 163
Es wurde dunkel.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 164
Gorbunow und Courton wechselten wie am Abend vorher ihre Plätze.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 165
Erwin saß regungslos in seinem Sessel, obgleich er von einer verzweifelten Unruhe gefoltert wurde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 166
Wenn sie auch den Viktor Emmanuele nicht abfingen!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 167
Aber wenigstens in Bombay mußten sie früher sein als der Dampfer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 168
Plötzlich fuhren alle auf.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 169
Selbst der ermüdete Gorbunow, der in einen todähnlichen Schlaf verfallen war.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 170
Der Motor hatte ausgesetzt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 172
Nur das Singen der Luft!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 173
Gorbunow sprang auf und eilte in den Führerstand.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 174
Ihm nach drängten die anderen Männer.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 175
Alle wußten, daß sich etwas Schlimmes ereignet haben mußte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 177
»Das ist unmöglich!« schrie Gorbunow.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 178
»Ich habe in Teheran sämtliche Tanks gefüllt!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 181
unit 185
Dicht unter den Rädern wurden die Gipfel ausgedehnter Tannenwälder sichtbar.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 186
Nur so lange das Flugzeug in der Luft halten, bis eine Lichtung kam, nur so lange!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 187
Dann war alles gerettet!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 188
– Aber die Lichtung kam nicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 190
Dann ließ sich ein Krachen, Prasseln und Splittern vernehmen, und die Maschine stand still.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 192
Erwin und Gorbunow wollten sofort hinaus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 193
Aber Renee und Courton rieten energisch ab.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 197
Denn die Maschine war bis auf ein paar Risse in den Tragflächen wunderbarerweise heil geblieben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 198
Nirgends ein Defekt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 200
Man schied sich in zwei Abteilungen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 202
Stundenlang wandelten die beiden Kundschafter umher.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 204
unit 205
Große Hunde stürzten laut bellend auf die Ankömmlinge los.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 207
»Paß ... Paß!« war das erste, was sie mit lebhaften Handbewegungen verlangten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 208
Allem Anschein nach hatte man es mit einer Grenzwache oder Gendarmeriestation zu tun.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 211
Aber die Leute ließen sich von ihrem Entschluß nicht abbringen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 213
Wann denn die Ankunft des Beamten zu erwarten sei?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 214
Nun in ein, zwei Wochen höchstens!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 215
Erwin war der Verzweifelung nahe.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 216
– Ein bis zwei Wochen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 217
Dann konnte es längst zu spät sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 218
Bis dahin war Afru sicher dort und sorgte dafür, daß Ivonne heimlich verschwand.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 219
Allein weder Bitten noch Drohungen halfen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 221
Endlos krochen die Tage dahin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 222
Kein Inspektor ließ sich sehen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 223
Wenn man fragte, gab es nur die lakonische Antwort: »Er wird schon kommen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 227
Diese Nacht war sehr dunkel, was der Flucht sehr zustatten kam.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 229
Der Techniker war mit dem Benzin bereits eingetroffen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 231
Nach Mitternacht war endlich alles fertig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 232
Gorbunow kletterte in den Führerstand und ließ den Motor anspringen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 233
unit 234
Gleich darauf begann das Flugzeug zu rollen und erhob sich nach wenigen Sekunden in die Luft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 235
Fort ging es in rasender Fahrt nach Süden!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 236
Am Nachmittag landete Gorbunow auf dem Flugplatz von Bombay.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 237
Erwin mietete ein Auto und fuhr direkt zum französischen Konsulat.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 240
Erwin bedankte sich und fuhr auf den Flugplatz zurück.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 241
Dort teilte er seinen Freunden alles mit, was er erfahren hatte.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 243
http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-puppen-des-maharadscha-9072/15
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 210  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 189  1 month, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 171  1 month, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 121  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 169  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 122  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 130  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 124  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 123  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 122  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 118  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 99  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 114  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 169  1 month, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 169  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 114  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 112  1 month, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 118  1 month, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 117  1 month, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 112  1 month, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 102  1 month, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 105  1 month, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 154  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 224  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 103  1 month, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 224  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 36  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 202  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 181  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 47  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 46  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 45  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 44  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 43  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 48  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 41  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 40  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 39  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 24  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 18  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 12  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 11  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 7  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 6  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 3  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 2  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 1  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 80  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 • 1781  commented on  unit 116  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 66  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 • 1781  commented on  unit 128  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 126  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 4  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 238  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 138  1 month, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 196  1 month, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 177  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 136  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 135  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 101  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 • 1781  commented on  unit 8  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 39  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 49  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 47  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 47  1 month, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 50  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 26  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 16  1 month, 3 weeks ago

Kapitel 14 - Im Flugzeug nach Indien.

Einige Tage nach den geschilderten Ereignissen saß Erwin Gerardi mit seinem Freunde, Ingenieur Francois Courton, abends auf der Terrasse des Hotels Bristol in Nizza und lauschte den Klängen der hervorragenden Kurmusik, als ein Ober diskret an ihn herantrat und ihm ein eben gebrachtes Telegramm überreichte. Courton widmete diesem Vorgang keine besondere Aufmerksamkeit, denn bei den ausgedehnten Geschäften Gerardis war es an der Tagesordnung, daß er Telegramme oder Eilbriefe erhielt, die in der Regel nichts Außergewöhnliches brachten.

Diesmal schien es aber doch etwas Besonderes zu sein, denn Erwin ließ plötzlich und unvermittelt das Telegramm fallen und wurde sehr blaß.

»Etwas Unangenehmes?« erkundigte sich Francois befremdet.

»Lies!« antwortete Erwin nur und schob ihm das Blatt zu. Gleichzeitig winkte er einem Ober, um zu zahlen.

Die Depesche enthielt folgende Worte:

»Sofort kommen! Frau Ivonne verschwunden! Vermute Verbrechen!

Louis.« -

»Donnerwetter!« entfuhr es Francois unwillkürlich. »Sieht der alte Kauz am Ende nicht Gespenster?!«

Erwin erhob sich:

»Es ist möglich und zu hoffen. Trotzdem dürfen wir keine Zeit verlieren. Ich benutze das nächste Flugzeug. Willst du mich begleiten ...?«

Francois nickte nur und folgte seinem hastig voranschreitenden Freunde zum Auto, das sie in wenigen Minuten zum Flugplatz brachte. Das nächste Flugzeug nach Marseille ging in einer Viertelstunde. Sie hatten gerade Zeit, die Fahrkarten zu lösen und ihre Plätze einzunehmen, da begann schon der Propeller zu surren.

Um Mitternacht trafen sie in Marseille ein. Es war sehr schönes Wetter und die Straßen daher noch ziemlich belebt. Als sie am Café Glacier vorüberfuhren, hörten sie laute Jazzmusik. Ein bitteres Gefühl überkam Erwin beim Klang dieser Rhythmen. Es fiel ihm ein, wie er vor eineinhalb Jahren an dieser Stelle mit Ivonne Martinet zusammengetroffen war und sie dann gemeinsam die fünf Millionen Franken auf der Bank de Commerce abgehoben hatten, die zur materiellen Grundlage ihres Glückes wurden. Nun würde er seine schöne Frau, die er aufrichtig liebte, vielleicht niemals wiedersehen.

Der Wagen hielt vor der Gerardischen Villa. Im Erdgeschoß war alles dunkel, aber im ersten Stock leuchteten noch einige Fenster. Wortlos gingen die beiden Freunde hinauf. Auch Francois konnte sich einer großen Unruhe nicht erwehren und war aufs äußerste gespannt, was sie in Erfahrung bringen würden.

Auf der Treppe kam ihnen der alte Louis entgegen. Er sah sehr mitgenommen und erregt aus. Seine Hände zitterten so stark, daß sie ihm beim Aufhängen der Mäntel helfen mußten. Dann betraten sie Erwins Studierzimmer und der Diener mußte erzählen.

Er war an dem Abend, als Ivonne ihn fortgeschickt hatte, erst nach Mitternacht heimgekehrt. Bereits an der Gartenpforte war ihm das laute Heulen und Bellen des Wolfshundes Jim aufgefallen, der unten in der Diele seine Lagerstatt hatte. Als er die Haustür öffnete, stürzte ihm der Hund winselnd entgegen, packte ihn an den Rockschößen und versuchte ihn hinter sich her zu ziehen. Als er nicht gleich darauf einging, lief der Hund voraus und begann an der Tür, die zu dem das ganze Erdgeschoß durchlaufenden Korridor führte, zu kratzen. Scheinbar hatte er sich bereits längere Zeit damit beschäftigt, denn die Politur wies schadhafte Stellen auf.

Darauf öffnete Louis die Korridortür und ließ den Hund hinaus. Er lief mit der Nase am Fußboden bis an das Zimmer, in dem der schwarze Koffer untergebracht war und setzte hier sein Kratzen mit gesteigerter Heftigkeit fort. Als Louis dies bemerkte, beruhigte er sich sofort wieder, da er wußte, daß der Koffer mittlerweile angekommen war. Er schob das merkwürdige Wesen des Hundes dem Umstande zu, daß er jedenfalls das Hineintragen des Gepäckstückes gehört, die Anwesenheit fremder Leute gewittert und dadurch gereizt worden war. Mit großer Mühe und unter Anwendung von Gewalt brachte er Jim wieder in die Diele, kettete ihn an und legte sich selbst zur Ruhe.

Am nächsten Morgen fiel es ihm auf, daß sich das Tier, als der Koffer zum Dampfer abgeholt wurde, wieder wie rasend gebärdete, laut heulte und große Anstrengungen machte, die Kette durchzubeißen und sich auf die Träger zu stürzen. Dergleichen war nie vorher geschehen, so daß Louis sich bereits Gedanken zu machen begann, die bösen Gerüchte, die über den Koffer und seinen Besitzer umgingen, seien womöglich nicht ganz aus der Luft gegriffen. Diese Mutmaßungen aber mit der Reise seiner Herrin in Zusammenhang zu bringen, fiel ihm vorderhand nicht ein.

Dieser Argwohn stieg in ihm erst auf, als er nach einigen Tagen einen Spaziergang am Kai entlang unternahm und zu seinem Befremden die Motorjacht Afrus unberührt an ihrer Anlegestelle verankert bemerkte. Ivonne hatte nämlich erzählt, Afru und sie würden auf der Jacht eine Reise nach Ajaccio unternehmen und von dort aus Nizza anlaufen, um Erwin abzuholen. Das entsprach nun jedenfalls nicht den Tatsachen. Ohne sich zu besinnen, begab er sich nach dem Hotel, in dem Afru abzusteigen pflegte und erkundigte sich nach dem Verbleib des Inders. Ihm wurde mitgeteilt, daß Afru bereits vor mehreren Tagen ziemlich plötzlich in der Nacht in Begleitung seines chinesischen Sekretärs nach Paris abgereist sei.

»Wissen Sie genau, daß keine Dame mit ihm war?« fragte nun der alte Mann fassungslos.

Der ihm auskunftgebende Angestellte drückte auf einen elektrischen Knopf und ließ durch einen herbeieilenden Boy den Unterportier rufen, der das Gepäck Afrus zur Bahn besorgt hatte. Jener kam und konnte mit Sicherheit bestätigen, daß Afru und Jen-Tsu-Tai allein in ihr Abteil gestiegen und nicht einmal auf dem Bahnhof mit irgendeiner Dame in Berührung gekommen seien.

In dem vergeblich grübelnden Louis stieg nun plötzlich in Verbindung mit dem seltsamen Gebaren des Hundes der Gedanke auf, Ivonne sei einem Verbrechen zum Opfer gefallen. Gleich darauf hatte er jenes unheilverkündende Telegramm aufgegeben, das Erwin im Hotel Bristol zugestellt worden war.

»Haben Sie die Polizei benachrichtigt?« war Erwins erste Frage.

Louis konnte bejahen. Direkt vom Telegraphenamt war er zur Präfektur gefahren und hatte dort alles, was er wußte, zu Protokoll gegeben. Zwei Stunden später waren dann mehrere Kriminalbeamte in der Villa gewesen, hatten alles genau besichtigt und ihn dann noch einmal zum Präfekten persönlich mitgenommen, dem er alles haarklein erzählen mußte. Es war also zu hoffen, daß bereits alles Menschenmögliche zur Rettung Ivonnes in die Wege geleitet wurde.

Erwin läutete die Präfektur sofort an. Der Präfekt hatte den Anruf erwartet und kam selbst an den Apparat.

»Gott sei Dank, daß Sie da sind!« rief er erfreut. »Meine ganze Hoffnung ruhte auf Ihrem schnellen Kommen!« -

»Besteht denn irgendwelche Aussicht, daß meine Frau gefunden wird?« -

»Natürlich. – Ich bin sogar fest davon überzeugt, daß sie sich wohlbehalten an Bord des Viktor Emmanuele befindet und nach Indien dampft.« -

»Kann eine polizeiliche Durchsuchung des Schiffes telegraphisch angeordnet werden?« -

»Ich habe bereits alles Erdenkliche unternommen, aber leider gar keine Erfolge erzielt. Der Viktor Emmanuele befindet sich augenblicklich entweder im Suez-Kanal oder bereits im Roten Meer, also durchweg in britischer Einflußsphäre. Da das Schiff aber nach Italien gehört und England eben aus politischen Gründen daran gelegen ist, jede Reiberei mit Mussolini zu vermeiden, ist der britische Konsul nicht zu überreden, auf Grund meiner Argumente, die er als zu unsicher bezeichnet, einen Eingriff durch die englischen Behörden in Athen oder Bombay zu veranlassen.« -

»Was kann also sonst unternommen werden, um den Räubern ihre Beute abzujagen, ehe es zu spät ist?« -

»Es kommt darauf an, ob Sie vor keinem finanziellen Opfer zurückschrecken!?« -

»Vor keinem! Und ginge dabei mein ganzes Vermögen in die Brüche!« -

»Sehr gut! – Ich empfehle Ihnen unter diesen Umständen, sich sofort mit einer Flugzeugfabrik zwecks käuflicher Überlassung eines Flugzeuges in Verbindung zu setzen und sich einige beherzte und zuverlässige Leute zu suchen, die Sie auf einer Reise nach Indien begleiten könnten. Alle Paßformalitäten sowie die Ausstellung von Vollmachten seitens der französischen Polizeibehörde übernehme ich natürlich zu sofortiger Erledigung. Ich nehme an, daß Sie bereits morgen früh fliegen können und werde unterdessen die Verhaftung Afrus in Paris veranlassen.«

Erwin hängte nach etlichen Abschieds- und Dankesworten den Hörer an und ließ sich ermattet und niedergeschlagen in einen Klubsessel fallen.

»Was ist dir?« erkundigte sich Francois voller Teilnahme.

»Es geht mir alles zu langsam, weißt du. – Morgen früh erst Abfahrt. Wer bürgt mir dafür, daß wir ohne Zwischenfall nach Indien gelangen. Kommt der Dampfer früher als ich in Bombay an, so ist Ivonne so gut wie verloren!« -

»Das ist doch nicht gesagt. – Wir werden, da die englische Polizei sich nicht einmischen will, das französische Konsulat in Bombay telegraphisch benachrichtigen und um aufmerksame Beobachtung der an Land gehenden Passagiere und des Gepäcks bitten!« -

»Das ist ein Gedanke! – Nun die zweite Frage, wo nehme ich so schnell ein Flugzeug her, das stark genug ist, die gewaltige Reise zu unternehmen und wo finde ich Begleiter, die sich bereit erklären, dieses immerhin recht abenteuerliche und gar nicht ungefährliche Unternehmen mitzumachen?« -

»Nichts einfacher als das! Wegen des Flugzeuges verständige ich einen Kollegen in Paris. Dort gibt es jetzt eine ganze Reihe von Maschinen, die für die jetzt aktuellen Amerikaflüge belastungserprobt und startbereit sind. Es wird nicht übermäßig schwerhalten, eine davon zu erwerben. Was aber die Begleiter anbetrifft, so habe ich bereits im stillen eine Auswahl getroffen, die hoffentlich auch deinen Wünschen zusagen wird. Es sind Dr. Renee, Juffo und ich!« -

»Ich weiß nicht, wie ich dir danken soll, daß du mich in dieser Situation nicht allein läßt. Das werde ich dir nie, nie vergessen!«

Erwin erhob sich und streckte dem Freunde die Hand hin, die jener nahm und kräftig schüttelte.

»Keine Ursache! Du weißt, daß ich immer so einen Hang zum Außergewöhnlichen gehabt habe, hier ist einmal eine Gelegenheit, seine überschüssigen Kräfte nutzbringend zu betätigen. – Also, um zum Schluß zu kommen. Ich gehe in mein Bureau und telegraphiere nach Paris. Du verständigst unterdessen den Doktor und Juffo.«

*

Der Flug wurde auf sieben Uhr morgens festgelegt. Bereits um sechs sollte die Maschine aus Paris eintreffen. Es war verabredet worden, sich in der Präfektur zu treffen, die Pässe und Polizeivollmachten in Empfang zu nehmen und dann gemeinsam nach dem Flugplatz hinauszufahren.

Die Nacht verging für alle Flugzeugteilnehmer – Renee und Juffo hatten ohne Zögern zugesagt – unter fieberhaften Vorbereitungen. Galt es doch nicht bloß die Überfahrt nach Bombay, sondern womöglich einen längeren Aufenthalt in Indien, da damit gerechnet werden mußte, daß Ivonne in das Innere des Landes verschleppt wurde und nur unter großen Hindernissen gerettet werden konnte. Man hatte auf Anraten des Präfekten beschlossen, sich offiziell als eine weltenbummelnde Jagdgesellschaft auszugeben und hatte auch die Papiere in diesem Sinne ausgestellt. So konnten die örtlichen indischen Behörden kein Mißtrauen fassen.

Fünf Minuten vor sechs traf das Flugzeug aus Paris ein und wurde sofort von einer Gruppe von Technikern und Ingenieuren noch einer letzten Besichtigung und Motorprüfung unterworfen. Unterdessen verfrachtete der vorläufig allein anwesende Juffo das gesamte Gepäck: Koffer, Zelte und Gewehre im Innern der recht geräumigen, für vier Passagiere berechneten Kabine.

Um dreiviertel sieben ratterte das Auto des Präfekten, der es sich nicht hatte nehmen lassen, die Herren persönlich zu begleiten, heran und hielt neben dem Leib des Riesenvogels, der unter dem Auf- und Abklettern der Mechaniker bebte und schwankte.

In letzter Minute war auf der Präfektur noch eine schlimme Botschaft aus Paris eingelaufen. Afru war entkommen! Die Polizeibeamten hatten erst lange vergeblich am Tor seiner Villa in Versailles gepocht und geklingelt, es schließlich gewaltsam geöffnet und im Innern des Hauses nichts als die etwas chaotisch verstreuten Überreste einer auf Flucht deutenden, überhasteten Abreise vorgefunden. Allem Anschein nach waren die Inder diesesmal endgültig verschwunden, denn auch das Gepäck der Dienerschaft, die Autos und sämtliche Benzinvorräte waren mitgenommen worden.

»Sie müssen mit dem Schlimmsten rechnen,« sagte der Präfekt sehr ernst zu Erwin, nachdem er ihm das Pariser Telegramm vorgelesen hatte. »Ich nehme an, daß sich Afru bereits ebenfalls auf dem Wege nach Indien befindet und sein früheres oder gleichzeitiges Eintreffen dürfte nicht nur ein Mißlingen Ihrer Pläne; sondern womöglich – was der Himmel verhüten möge – sogar den Tod Ihrer Frau im Gefolge haben!«

Man machte sich mit dem Piloten, einem früheren russischen Kampfflieger, Oberleutnant Sergej Gorbunow, bekannt, instruierte ihn über die Sachlage und bestieg dann das Flugzeug. Noch letztes Händeschütteln, letzte Wünsche und Abschiedsworte, dann begann der Motor zu bellen. Die Propeller wurden eingeschwenkt und eröffneten ihre rollende Musik. Das ganze Flugzeug schüttelte und bebte wie in wütender Erregung. Dann setzte es sich mit einem kurzen Ruck in Bewegung, eilte blitzschnell über das glatte Gelände und erhob sich ohne Anstrengung in schräger, immer mehr ansteigender Linie in die Luft. Bereits nach zwei Minuten war es in südöstlicher Richtung verschwunden.

*

Italien und das Adriatische Meer zogen unter den Fliegern vorüber. Um Mittag schwebten sie über dem Königreich Südslawien. Die wildzerklüfteten, schnee- und gletscherbedeckten Gipfel des Balkan- und Rhodopegebirges reckten ihre Häupter in bedrohlicher Nähe unter ihnen auf. Schließlich gingen sie in eine grüne, fruchtbare Ebene über, die von zwei breiten, in der Ferne scheinbar zusammenfindenden Flußläufen durchströmt wurde. Dann neue Hügel. Rechts eine gewaltige Wasserfläche. Nach einer halben Stunde links dasselbe Bild, plötzlich ein Gewirr von gelblichen würfelförmigen Gebäuden und minarettgeschmückten Moscheen. Querdurch eine blaufunkelnde Straße, das rechte und linke Wasser verbindend. Konstantinopel! Der Bosporus, die Fluten des Schwarzen Meeres in die Marmara hinüberleitend.

Weiter dröhnte der Propeller, ohne sein eintöniges Lied zu unterbrechen. Es begann langsam zu dunkeln. Der Sonnenball hing wie eine glühende, purpurne Träne im braunvioletten Dunst des westlichen Himmels, der von den Zacken eines felsigen Gebirges begrenzt wurde. Francois Courton löste den Oberleutnant Gorbunow am Steuer ab, der sich auch sogleich im bequemen Ledersessel des Ingenieurs ausstreckte und ohne etwas zu sagen einschlief. Unten glitten Kleinasiens nackte Berge, in ein eigenartig fahles Zwielicht getaucht, vorüber. Dann plötzlich und unvermittelt brach die Dunkelheit herein. Renee und Juffo schliefen nun ebenfalls. Erwin hielt es als einziger Wacher nicht mehr allein in der Kabine aus. Er ging nach vorne und setzte sich neben Francois. Obgleich er wußte, daß auch hier ein Gespräch infolge des Propellergetöses so gut wie ausgeschlossen sei, fühlte er sich in dieser Umgebung doch wohler als in dem Halbdunkeln, vom Dunst der schlafenden Männer erfüllten Passagierraum.

Um Mitternacht überquerten sie Armenien und im Morgengrauen gingen sie auf dem bei der persischen Residenz Teheran gelegenen Flugplatz des deutschen Äro-Lloyds nieder, um die Benzintanks zu füllen und die Motoren nachzusehen.

Nach zweistündiger Pause, in der die fünf Männer vergeblich versuchten, etwas Gelenkigkeit in ihre steifgewordenen Gliedmaßen zu bringen, bestiegen sie seufzend wieder ihr Flugzeug, um sich von neuem dem Reich der Lüfte anzuvertrauen. Diesesmal flogen sie jedoch nicht wie anfangs in südlicher Richtung, sondern steuerten direkt nach Süden über das persische Meer auf die Küste des Sultanats Oman zu. Diese Kursänderung war durch eine aus Frankreich für Erwin in Teheran eingelaufene Funkdepesche bewirkt worden, in der der Marseiller Präfekt ihm mitteilte, der Viktor Emmanuele befinde sich im Roten Meer vor Aden.

War der Flug bisher bei schönstem Wetter von statten gegangen, so zeigten nun doch im Westen sich auftürmende Wolkenmassen, daß Asiens Natur nicht gewillt sei, die fünf fremden Männer ohne Kampf in sein Inneres zu lassen. Je höher die Sonne stieg, um so drohender bewölkte sich der Himmel. Gelegentlich zuckten grelle Blitze und wurden von ohrenbetäubenden Donnerschlägen begleitet. Gorbunow setzte das Höhensteuer in Bewegung und ließ die Maschine steigen. Bald waren sie von düsteren Wolkenschleiern eingehüllt, die Bergketten Farsistans verschwanden, und endlich leuchtete wieder blauer Himmel. Allerdings von der Erde war nichts zu sehen, so weit das Auge reichte, brodelte in der Tiefe ein wild durcheinanderwogendes, donnerndes Wolkenchaos, dessen klobige, grotesk geformte Wogen wild gegeneinander stürmten. Dazu herrschte in dieser Höhe ein beträchtlicher Sturm, der sie, da die Erdorientierung versagte, leicht aus der eingeschlagenen Richtung bringen konnte.

Als etwa fünf Uhr nachmittags war, erklärte Gorbunow, sie müßten sich seiner Berechnung nach nunmehr längst über dem Sultanat Oman oder der arabischen Wüste befinden, und er werde daher zur Orientierung durch die Wolken hindurch bis auf eine geringe Flughöhe hinabgehen. Überdies schien das Gewitter nachgelassen zu haben, die violette Bronzefarbe der Wolken hatte sich verloren und war einem einförmigen, undurchdringlichen Grau gewichen.

Gorbunow drosselte den Motor ab, das Geräusch der Propeller verstummte, und sie begannen zu sinken, in langsamem Gleitflug, tiefer und tiefer, während die vorüberströmende Luft pfeifend an den Wänden des Führerstandes und der Kabine entlangbrauste. Regenfluten setzten plötzlich ein und überspülten trommelnd die Metallhaube der Kabine. Dann wurden schließlich wie durch einen dichten Schleier, allmählich aber immer deutlicher und deutlicher, die Umrisse eines bewaldeten Gebirges sichtbar.

Man holte Karten hervor und versuchte sich zu orientieren. Laut diesen war im östlichen Teil Arabiens nur an der Küste Osmans ein mittelgroßes Gebirge vorhanden, sonst aber dehnte sich überall unübersehbare Sandwüste. Sie gingen noch etwas tiefer und flogen dann scharf nach Westen, um an den Rand des Gebirges zu gelangen. Aber vergeblich. Sie sahen zuweilen langgestreckte Täler, in denen sich kleine Dörfer befanden, vor deren windschiefen Hütten sich die Menschen scharenweise versammelten, um nach dem schnarrenden Riesenvogel emporzustarren. Aber nirgends bemerkten sie auch nur das geringste Anzeichen einer wüstenähnlichen Landschaft.

»Wir sind überhaupt nicht in Arabien!« entschied schließlich Courton, als sie bereits eine Stunde dieselbe Richtung eingehalten hatten, ohne zu irgendeinem Ergebnis zu kommen.

»Der Sturm hat uns nach Osten abgetrieben und wir befinden uns in der Nähe des mittelasiatischen Gebirges. Diese Dörfer haben mir von Anfang an nicht nach arabischen Niederlassungen ausgesehen.«

Er wollte weitersprechen, hielt aber inne und wies auf zwei kleine Löcher, die sich plötzlich unter einem knirschenden Geräusch unten im Fußboden und oben in der Dachhaube gebildet hatten und durch die sogleich die vorwitzigen Regentropfen hereinzusickern begannen.

Erwin erfaßte als erster, worum es sich handelte.

»Wir werden beschossen!« rief er erregt.

Wie zur Bestätigung seiner Worte zerplatzte laut knallend eine Fensterscheibe und überschüttete die Insassen der Kabine mit einem Hagel von Glassplittern.

Gorbunow schien nun auch etwas gemerkt zu haben, denn das Donnern des Motors verstärkte sich plötzlich, wurde tief und dröhnend, und die Erde begann zu fallen. Durch ihre Krimstecher sahen sie noch eine Schar von berittenen Männern, die in wahnsinniger Eile eine Straße entlang sprengten und ihre langen Büchsen in die Luft abfeuerten. Es handelte sich wahrscheinlich um Soldaten irgendeines asiatischen Kleinstaates, die in dem auffallend niedrigen Flug des Äroplans einen Spionageakt witterten.

Sie flogen und flogen. Es wurde dunkel. Gorbunow und Courton wechselten wie am Abend vorher ihre Plätze. Erwin saß regungslos in seinem Sessel, obgleich er von einer verzweifelten Unruhe gefoltert wurde. Wenn sie auch den Viktor Emmanuele nicht abfingen! Aber wenigstens in Bombay mußten sie früher sein als der Dampfer.

Plötzlich fuhren alle auf. Selbst der ermüdete Gorbunow, der in einen todähnlichen Schlaf verfallen war. Der Motor hatte ausgesetzt. Einmal, zweimal schnarchte er noch asthmatisch auf, dann gab es ein lang anhaltendes böses Rasseln und dann wurde es ganz still. Nur das Singen der Luft!

Gorbunow sprang auf und eilte in den Führerstand. Ihm nach drängten die anderen Männer. Alle wußten, daß sich etwas Schlimmes ereignet haben mußte.

»Das Benzin ist alle ...!« erklärte Francois Courton achselzuckend und wies auf eine Meßuhr, deren Zeiger auf Null stand.

»Das ist unmöglich!« schrie Gorbunow. »Ich habe in Teheran sämtliche Tanks gefüllt! Mit dem Quantum müßten wir bis morgen abend reichen!«

»O ja, wir müßten ..., wenn wir nicht beschossen worden wären. Ich bin davon überzeugt, daß eine Kugel das Zufuhrrohr durchbohrt hat und daß der Inhalt der Tanks auf diese Weise zwar langsam, aber doch mit grausamer Sicherheit ausgelaufen ist!«

Ein minutenlanges Schweigen trat ein. Alle fühlten, daß der Ingenieur recht haben mußte, denn es gab schlechthin keine andere Erklärung.

Courton hatte wieder am Steuer Platz genommen und starrte auf die sich mit großer Schnelligkeit nähernde Erde hinab. Glücklicherweise hatten sich die Wolken nach Anbruch der Dunkelheit geteilt und das Licht des Mondes beherrschte, wenn auch ziemlich unsicher, das Gelände.

»Hinsetzen!« schrie Courton plötzlich warnend den anderen zu und machte eine verzweifelte Anstrengung, die Maschine zu fangen. Dicht unter den Rädern wurden die Gipfel ausgedehnter Tannenwälder sichtbar.

Nur so lange das Flugzeug in der Luft halten, bis eine Lichtung kam, nur so lange! Dann war alles gerettet! – Aber die Lichtung kam nicht. Es gab urplötzlich einen furchtbaren Stoß, so furchtbar, daß sämtliche Insassen aus ihren Sesseln gegen die ledergepolsterten Kabinenwände geschleudert wurden. Dann ließ sich ein Krachen, Prasseln und Splittern vernehmen, und die Maschine stand still. Rechts und links an die Fenster aber legten sich wie zahllose Finger grüne geisterhafte Hände die Kronen der Bäume, in denen das Flugzeug steckengeblieben war.

Erwin und Gorbunow wollten sofort hinaus. Aber Renee und Courton rieten energisch ab.

»Es hat keinen Zweck, daß ihr jetzt in der Nacht in den Wäldern umherirrt und euch allen möglichen Eventualitäten aussetzt,« sagte Courton. »Wir bleiben vorläufig in der Kabine, machen es uns so bequem wie möglich und schlafen bis Sonnenaufgang. Dann wollen wir weiter sehen.«

So schlimm der ganze Zwischenfall war, so erwies es sich am nächsten Morgen doch, daß er noch unangenehmer hätte ausgehen können. Denn die Maschine war bis auf ein paar Risse in den Tragflächen wunderbarerweise heil geblieben. Nirgends ein Defekt. Sogar die Propeller hatten sich so günstig in die Äste geschoben, daß man hoffen konnte, das Flugzeug gänzlich unversehrt auf den Boden zu bekommen.

Man schied sich in zwei Abteilungen. Erwin und Gorbunow begaben sich auf die Suche nach einer menschlichen Niederlassung, um Hilfe herbeizuholen, während die übrigen Männer das festgefahrene Flugzeug bewachen sollten.

Stundenlang wandelten die beiden Kundschafter umher. Immer weiter und weiter entfernten sie sich vom Landungsplatz, immer höher und höher stieg die glühende Sonne. Endlich um Mittagszeit bemerkten sie ein paar Lehmhütten, in deren Umgebung struppige Pferde weideten. Große Hunde stürzten laut bellend auf die Ankömmlinge los. Dann erschienen mehrere wenig Vertrauen erweckend aussehende Männer in langen, braunen Mänteln, und schlenderten ihnen, die Hunde zurückrufend, entgegen.

»Paß ... Paß!« war das erste, was sie mit lebhaften Handbewegungen verlangten. Allem Anschein nach hatte man es mit einer Grenzwache oder Gendarmeriestation zu tun. Als sie die gewünschten Papiere erhalten hatten, zogen sie sich zu einer langen Beratung zurück, flüsterten geheimnisvoll miteinander und erklärten schließlich durch nicht mißzuverstehende Gesten, die Herren müßten dableiben, bis die Pässe von irgendeinem »Pan Inspektor« visiert seien. Gorbunow suchte ihnen auf russisch begreiflich zu machen, daß das unter keinen Umständen ginge, da sie keine Zeit verlieren dürften, sondern im Gegenteil Hilfe brauchten, um ihr Flugzeug wieder flott zu bekommen. Aber die Leute ließen sich von ihrem Entschluß nicht abbringen. Das Flugzeug sollte zwar heruntergeholt und auf einen bequemen Startplatz transportiert werden, aber bis der Pan Inspektor käme, müßten die Herren sich schon gedulden.

Wann denn die Ankunft des Beamten zu erwarten sei?

Nun in ein, zwei Wochen höchstens!

Erwin war der Verzweifelung nahe. – Ein bis zwei Wochen. Dann konnte es längst zu spät sein. Bis dahin war Afru sicher dort und sorgte dafür, daß Ivonne heimlich verschwand. Allein weder Bitten noch Drohungen halfen. Er und Gorbunow wurden in einer Hütte eingeschlossen und am Abend kamen die drei anderen Herren, die man unterdessen auch dingfest gemacht hatte, noch hinzu.

Endlos krochen die Tage dahin. Kein Inspektor ließ sich sehen. Wenn man fragte, gab es nur die lakonische Antwort:

»Er wird schon kommen. Es hat ja noch Zeit!«

Als die zweite Woche zur Neige ging und sich noch immer keine Aussicht auf Befreiung zeigte, beschloß Erwin, einen der afghanischen Grenzwächter zu bestechen und mit dessen Hilfe heimlich davonzufliegen. Gorbunow, der sich dank seiner russischen Sprachkenntnisse zur Not mit den Eingeborenen verständigen konnte, führte die Unterhandlungen. Erst weigerte sich der Mann, aber dann, als er bares Geld sah, wurde er zugänglicher und versprach in der folgenden Nacht aus dem nahen Städtchen Chasch Benzin und einen Techniker herbeizuschaffen.

Diese Nacht war sehr dunkel, was der Flucht sehr zustatten kam. Ohne daß die schlafenden Wächter etwas merkten, hoben die Männer mit Hilfe einiger Werkzeuge, die ihnen der Afghane zugesteckt hatte, ein Fenster aus und eilten zum Startplatz. Der Techniker war mit dem Benzin bereits eingetroffen. In großer Hast machte man sich daran, beim Schein einiger Blendlaternen das durchlöcherte Rohr zu verlöten und die Tanks zu füllen. Nach Mitternacht war endlich alles fertig. Gorbunow kletterte in den Führerstand und ließ den Motor anspringen. Die elektrische Innenbeleuchtung erstrahlte, die Kabine wurde bestiegen und die Türen klappten dumpf zu. Gleich darauf begann das Flugzeug zu rollen und erhob sich nach wenigen Sekunden in die Luft. Fort ging es in rasender Fahrt nach Süden!

Am Nachmittag landete Gorbunow auf dem Flugplatz von Bombay. Erwin mietete ein Auto und fuhr direkt zum französischen Konsulat. Dort wurde ihm mitgeteilt, daß der Viktor Emmanuele am Vortage in Bombay eingelaufen und tatsächlich ein schwarzer Koffer, wie der von Erwin beschriebene, an Land gebracht worden sei. Soviel sich hatte beobachten lassen, war er in einem Luxuswagen des Maharadscha von Sukentala am Abend mit der Nordbahn abtransportiert worden.

Erwin bedankte sich und fuhr auf den Flugplatz zurück. Dort teilte er seinen Freunden alles mit, was er erfahren hatte. Es wurde beschlossen, ohne in Bombay Aufenthalt zu nehmen, sofort den Flug an die Grenze von Nepal, wo der Rajapalast von Sukentala am Ufer der Flusses Gandak gelegen war, fortzusetzen und nicht eher zu ruhen, als bis der Aufenthaltsort und das Schicksal Ivonnes erkundet war.

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-puppen-des-maharadscha-9072/15