de-en  Siegfried Bergengruen: Die Puppen des Maharadscha - 8. Kapitel - Eine nächtliche Begegnung
Chapter 8 - A nocturnal encounter.

At the same time as Erwin took Juffo and Jeanette into his service, Dr. Renee, the well known Marseille Psychiatrist, sat at the great oak desk in his study and stared steadfastly at a large, oil portrait that hung on the silk covered wall opposite him. The portrait depicted a young woman, whose narrow face stood out pale and translucent from the dark background and whose eyes seemed to hide such an unfathomable depth, that often even strangers would remain standing for minutes at a time and try to come to grips with the extraordinary allure of this incomparable feminine beauty.

A single standing lamp with a blue shade glowed in a remote corner of the large room, enveloping all objects with a soft, moonlit shimmer.

The doctor sat thus for a ling time. Nothing moved in the sleeping house, and only occasionally did the whirring sound of passing cars penetrate up to this floor.

"Where are you, where are you...?? !" whispered the lips of the solitary man, whilst his hands clenched the leather on the arms of the chair.

"Where are you? - if only I knew that they had killed you - but there are things that are more terrible than death. . . . There are things . . .!" He broke off mid sentence and lowered his high, white forehead down onto the cold table top. A desperate moan escaped from his mouth, as nervous fits of shivering racked his body.

"Only a short message...only a short word, that I know, where I'm at! -But this uncertainty tortures me to death!" An electric bell shrilled in the hallway. The doctor started, smoothed back his hair, turned on the candelabra and went to open the door. It was Henri Lessot, the detective he had hired.

"What have you found out?" asked the doctor anxiously, whilst he led his guest into the study and offered him a Virginia.

The detective looked around as if he was afraid of being overheard, then went right up to Renee and said quietly: "Erwin Gerardi is not involved in the matter!" The doctor flinched and became even paler.

"How did you find that out?" "Very simply - I asked his wife." "You are one hell of a fellow. I always thought you didn't know the lady!" "Up until an hour and a half ago, you were right in assuming so. Then however, I succeeded in meeting her." "How did you do that?" "I met her by chance in Madame Boubet's studio. You know it's never easier to stalk a lady than when she's worrying about her future wardrobe. Within a few minutes, through my obvious understanding of women's dress, I had won her complete trust. As her husband, for some reason, did not come to collect her, she accepted my escort. On the way we drank a Mocca and two Chartreuse in Café Glacier. As you well know, alcohol loosens the tongue, I steered the conversation inconspicuously to the mysterious vehicle and learned that Mrs. Ivonne and her husband have not yet discovered the contents of the trunk." "Yes, the devil, why do they hide that thing at their place?" "Why? - I also fathomed that more or less. Gerardi has signed some bad check some time in the past and this document unfortunately is in the hands of the Indian who uses it to make Gerardi subservient to him." The two men were silent for a while and thoughtfully blew the smoke of their cigars into the air. The matter was complicated and was even made harder by the fact that both the police of Marseille and of Paris refused to take action against Sanjo Afru in any way. Elise Renee was in Paris, where she traveled alone a few months ago, and was indeed seen accompanied by the Indian. He by no means denied knowing a lady by that name, but it could not be determined that he knew of her disappearance or was even involved in it.

"Wouldn't it be best if I had a word with Gerardi and asked him to help us. The trunk was in his custody for a whole night, and that would probably be enough time to open and, if necessary, close the lock in a clever manner, no matter how complicated the construction may be." But Henri Lessot was dissuasive.

"Not yet," he said. "Gerardi isn't interested in coming into conflict with Afru, and mere assumptions will certainly not persuade him to forcibly open the trunk entrusted to him. - It would be a very different story, of course, if we had some proof that your wife was with the Indian last night. This immediately changes the situation and deals us all the trump cards in a single blow. But until then, as hard as it gets, we have to wait..." Dr. Renee rose and nervously walked up and down on the carpet. He felt bound, wherever he could and wanted to do something, he came up against the walls of conventional bureaucracy that European society had gradually piled up around itself.

" What news have you got from Paris?" he finally asked, standing still.

Regretfully the detective shrugged his shoulders.

"My people do what they can. But just when it is most necessary, our power stops. Although we can observe Sanjo Afru leaving his house and can partly accompany him on his way into the city, but what happens in his apartment remains impenetrable, and likewise the frosted glass windows of his car prevent any view to the inside. Moreover, he has several cars that look exactly alike and are parked in different garages in Paris, so if he feels that he's being followed, he simply leaves his car on one side of the building where he has something to do, leaves through back doors, and in the same way goes to a second car waiting for him on another street." "Have you tried to bribe the servants or, better still, smuggle one of your colleagues onto Afrus' property as a domestic servant?" "Everything has been done and everything has failed! - The Indian doorkeeper, whom we of course approached first, listened to everything with stoic calm, even had a handsome sum given to him, as if he were agreeing to everything, and then threw all the money at the feet of a few passing beggars without an air of expression." "So my plan to steal the suitcase from Gerardis villa was the only way left!" It was the first time that Renee had informed Lessot of this intention, and the effect was correspondingly great.

"Do you really mean that ...! - I am tired of groping in the dark and have already taken preparatory steps ...!" - "Mr. Renee! ... Are you also aware that if the trunk does not contain what you assume, your action will be condemned by the court as burglary?" - "I have also deliberated about that! ... But I am so down with my nerves that I prefer to sit in prison instead of being martyred by this appalling uncertainty!" -- "I cannot do more than warn you!" said Lessot, and stood up. ... " In the end, everyone lead their own lives! And you will probably not misunderstand it that I personally won't participate in your plan ...!" Renee smiled. ...

"I didn't expect it either," he replied authoritatively," and I have only one request to make of you, even if I were to be arrested, or if anything else should happen to me, I want you to continue your investigation. The necessary sums have been deposited with a lawyer." It was elven o'clock by now and Lessot took his leave. Renee accompanied him down to the street, then signaled for a taxi and drove to the Café Oriental where he hoped to learn somethng new from Juffo.

But the Italian wasn't there any longer. Instead he met Erwin Gerardi who was saying goodbye to a slim, redhead girl at the door of the joint. For a moment the two men measured each other with almost hostile glances. Just one moment! - Then came Erwin - following as it were the commandment of a sudden inspiration - up to the doctor and said: "Doctor Renee! I believe it is fortunate that we have met! Anyway, the striking interest you have recently shown in me gives me the right to ask you for clarification!" The doctor was so taken aback that he couldn't answer immediately.

"I don't understand what you mean ...!" finally came out of him.

Erwin gave Jeannette a sign to leave, came close to Renee and whispered: "You intend to break into my house ...! ?" - And since the doctor didn't answer: "Perhaps you would have the goodness to explain to me what you suspect is in Sanjo Afrus' trunk! Dr. Renee suddenly realized that this man was not speaking to him with hostile intent, but was himself trying to unravel a dark secret. At the same time it became clear to him that Juffo had to be prepared and had confessed everything. So there was no choice but to reach an agreement with Gerardi or to be prepared for the worst.

"Let's sit down first," he finally said, to save time. ...

They settled in the same niche where Erwin had negotiated with Jeannette. Pierre brought a new bottle and then retired discreetly. He, too, suspected that serious matters were to be discussed here.

After a while, Dr. Renee leaned so far forward that his face came very close to Erwin and said, "have you ever had the suspicion that the Indian's trunk contained some gruesome secret...?" - "No!" - "No! Erwin lied deliberately, so as not to give the impression that he had wanted to favor any criminal act.

"But did you think that the trunk only contained dolls? !" - "Up till now, I've had no reason worth mentioning to assume otherwise. And even if I did, it was none of my business, since it was not my trunk ..." - "Didn't you think, for instance, that this trunk was meant to ... to transport corpses! ?" Erwin was overcome by horror. Was this man trying to buffalo him or had his mind been clouded by the mysterious disappearance of the Elise woman?

"Surely you jest," he said with forced indifference. "And I can assure you, however, that such fantastic ideas have never occurred to me!" - "The idea isn't as fantastic as it sounds at first. - I assume you've read about my wife's mysterious disappearance...?" - "Of course. And I do not need to assure you that this misfortune has affected me deeply. But what has this...?" - "One moment, please. - My wife was often seen in the company of her friend Afru in the last days before her disappearance!" - "Hmm!" - In the evening after her disappearance, the mysterious car arrived here and brought the trunk to your place, and from there it was transported to the Indian steamer the next morning. - Can you deny that under these circumstances a certain suspicion ... Erwin considered and had to admit that the physician's associations of ideas were not entirely made up out of thin air. - But on the other hand, what would Afru gain from killing a woman, packing her in a trunk and sending her to India? There were no cannibals there, and if there had been a suspicion of murder, the police would have insisted on opening the trunk long ago, anyway - at most, such things were read about only in novels, while room for these things no longer exists in reality!

When he expressed these considerations, however, the doctor disarmed him with a new idea.

"You don't have to take the word "corpse" literally," he said. "There are living corpses! - have you never heard of white slave trader stunning their victims to make them easier to transport? - How, if the dolls of the legendary Maharajah of Sukentala, who, by the way, as I have determined, actually exists and is connected to Afru, how - if they are really European women?" The doctor looked at Erwin with excitement and, to his satisfaction, was able to see that his words had made an impression for the first time. ...

"What do you think...?" he whispered excitedly and hoped that he had finally won his opponent over for his intentions. ...

But Erwin didn't give up so easily. Before he set about stirring up such a delicate matter, he wanted solid evidence and not fantastic guesses at his disposal. But only Jeannette could give him this proof.

"For the time being nothing," he answered, therefore, coolly. "However, I can reassure you that I have already taken steps to receive clarification about the Indian's life in Paris and that I am ready, in case my representatives establish something positive, to have the police open the trunk" "And you would not under any circumstances open it yourself?" asked Renee disappointed. "I can get you a locksmith who is a real artist in his field and whose secrecy you can rely on under all circumstance." Erwin shook his head.

"I would only consider such a thing if the police refuse to carry out my request to open it. And I cannot imagine that this will be the case." The gentlemen stood up. Pierre rushed over, helped them into the rain-wet coats and received some gold pieces under never-ending, submissive bowings.

Before they stepped into their cars, Erwin said in front of the door: "You don't have to consider me your opponent, dear Doctor. On the contrary, you can rely on that I will do anything in my own interest, to enforce the solution of this odd riddle." They shook hands and drove away in different directions. Though Dr. Renee was not satisfied, but had the comforting feeling, to know the matter in the hands of a personality who, although not overly fast, but safely and calmly will penetrate to the aim.

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-puppen-des-maharadscha-9072/9
unit 1
Kapitel 8 - Eine nächtliche Begegnung.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 5
Lange saß der Doktor so.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 7
»Wo bist du wo bist du ...??
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 9
»Wo bist du?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 13
»Nur eine Nachricht ... nur ein kurzes Wort, damit ich weiß, woran ich bin!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 16
Es war Henri Lessot, der von ihm beauftragte Detektiv.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 25
Unterwegs tranken wir im Café Glacier eine Tasse Mokka und zwei Charteusen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 27
– Auch das habe ich halbwegs ergründet.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 33
»Noch nicht,« sagte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 39
»Was haben Sie für Nachrichten aus Paris?« fragte er schließlich stehenbleibend.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 40
Der Detektiv zuckte bedauernd die Achseln.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 41
»Meine Leute tun was sie können.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 42
Aber gerade, wo es am notwendigsten wäre, hört unsere Macht auf.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 46
»Ist das Ihr Ernst ...!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 50
»Schließlich muß jeder selbst wissen, was er tut!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 55
Aber er traf den Italiener nicht mehr an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 57
Einen Augenblick maßen sich die beiden Männer mit beinahe feindlichen Blicken.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 58
Einen Augenblick nur!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 60
Ich glaube, es ist gut, daß wir uns getroffen haben!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 62
»Ich verstehe nicht, was Sie meinen ...!« stieß er schließlich hervor.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 65
unit 67
»Wollen wir uns erst setzen ...,« sagte er schließlich, um Zeit zu gewinnen.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 68
unit 69
Pierre brachte eine neue Flasche und zog sich dann diskret zurück.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 70
Auch er ahnte, daß hier schwerwiegende Dinge besprochen werden sollten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 72
»Haben Sie aber geglaubt, daß der Koffer ausgerechnet nur Puppen enthalte ...?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 73
!« - »Ich hatte bisher keinen nennenswerten Grund, etwas anderes anzunehmen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 75
?« Erwin überlief ein Grauen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 77
»Sie belieben zu scherzen,« sagte er daher mit erzwungener Gleichgültigkeit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 81
Aber was hat das ...?« - »Einen Augenblick, bitte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 87
»Sie brauchen das Wort »Leiche« nicht buchstäblich zu nehmen,« sagte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 88
»Es gibt lebendige Leichname!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 92
Aber Erwin gab sich nicht so leicht aus der Hand.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 94
Jene aber konnte ihm erst Jeannette liefern.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 95
»Vorläufig nichts,« antwortete er daher kühl.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 99
unit 104
http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-puppen-des-maharadscha-9072/9
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago

Kapitel 8 - Eine nächtliche Begegnung.

Dr. Renee, der bekannte Marseiller Psychiater, saß um dieselbe Zeit, da Erwin Juffo und Jeannette für sich verpflichtete, an dem gewaltigen, dunkelgebeizten Eichenschreibtisch seines Herrenzimmers und starrte unverwandt auf ein großes, ölgemaltes Porträt, das ihm gegenüber an der seidenbespannten Wand hing. Das Porträt stellte eine junge Frau dar, deren schmales Gesicht sich blaß und durchsichtig von dem dunklen Hintergrunde abhob und deren Augen eine so unergründliche Tiefe zu bergen schienen, daß oft selbst fremde Menschen minutenlang stehenblieben und sich mit dem seltsamen Zauber dieser unvergleichlichen Frauenschönheit auseinandersetzen mußten.

Eine einzige blaubeschirmte Stehlampe glühte in einer entlegenen Ecke des großen Raumes und umhüllte alle Gegenstände mit einem sanften, mondscheinhaften Schimmer.

Lange saß der Doktor so. Nichts rührte sich in dem schlafenden Hause, und nur zuweilen fauchte das Geräusch vorüberhastender Automobile von der Rue Bergere bis in dieses Stockwerk herauf.

»Wo bist du wo bist du ...??!« flüsterten die Lippen des einsamen Mannes, während sich seine Hände um das Leder der Seitenlehnen des Stuhles krumpften.

»Wo bist du? – wenn ich wenigstens wüßte, daß sie dich getötet haben – Aber es gibt Dinge, die schlimmer sind als der Tod! ... Es gibt Dinge ...!«

Er brach mitten ab und senkte die hohe, weiße Stirn bis auf die kalte Platte des Tisches. Ein verzweifeltes Stöhnen entrang sich seinem Munde, während nervöse Fieberschauer den Körper schüttelten.

»Nur eine Nachricht ... nur ein kurzes Wort, damit ich weiß, woran ich bin! – Aber diese Ungewißheit quält mich zu Tode!«

Eine elektrische Glocke schrillte auf dem Flur. Der Doktor fuhr auf, strich sich das Haar zurück, drehte den Kronleuchter an und ging, um zu öffnen. Es war Henri Lessot, der von ihm beauftragte Detektiv.

»Was haben Sie Neues?« fragte der Arzt gespannt, während er seinen Gast in das Schreibzimmer geleitete und ihm eine Virginia anbot.

Der Detektiv sah sich um, als fürchte er, belauscht zu werden, trat dann dicht an Renee heran und sagte leise: »Erwin Gerardi ist an der Sache unbeteiligt!«

Der Doktor zuckte zusammen und wurde noch blässer.

»Wie haben Sie das herausbekommen?« -

»Sehr einfach – Ich habe seine Frau gefragt.« -

»Sie sind ein Mordskerl. – Ich dachte immer, Sie kennen die Dame nicht!« -

»Bis vor anderthalb Stunden hatten Sie in dieser Annahme recht. Dann aber gelang es mir, sie kennenzulernen.« -

»Auf welche Weise?« -

»Ich begegnete ihr zufällig im Atelier der Madame Boubet. Sie wissen, daß es nie leichter ist, sich an eine Dame heranzupirschen, als wenn sie dabei ist, sich über ihre künftige Garderobe Sorge zu machen. Binnen einiger Minuten hatte ich durch mein offensichtliches Verständnis für weibliche Toiletten ihr volles Vertrauen erworben. Da ihr Gemahl sie aus irgendwelchen Gründen nicht abholen kam, nahm sie meine Begleitung an. Unterwegs tranken wir im Café Glacier eine Tasse Mokka und zwei Charteusen. Alkohol löst bekanntlich die Zungen, ich lenkte das Gespräch unmerklich auf das geheimnisvolle Auto und erfuhr auch, daß Frau Ivonne und ihr Gemahl den Inhalt des Koffers noch nicht ergründet haben.«

»Ja, zum Teufel, warum verstecken sie dann das Ding bei sich?« -

»Warum? – Auch das habe ich halbwegs ergründet. Gerardi hat mal früher irgendeinen Scheck unterschrieben, der nicht gedeckt war, und dieses Papier befindet sich leider Gottes in den Händen des Inders, der es dazu ausnützt, sich Gerardi dienstbar zu machen.«

Eine Weile schwiegen die beiden Männer und pafften nachdenklich den Rauch ihrer Zigarren in die Luft. Die Sache war verwickelt und wurde dadurch noch erschwert, daß sowohl die Marseiller als auch die Pariser Polizei jegliches Einschreiten gegen Sanjo Afru abgelehnt hatten. Elise Renee war zwar in Paris, wohin sie vor einigen Monaten allein gereist war, in der Gesellschaft des Inders gesehen worden, und dieser leugnete auch in keiner Weise, eine Dame dieses Namens zu kennen, aber es ließ sich eben nicht feststellen, daß er auch irgendwie um ihr Verschwinden wußte oder gar daran beteiligt war.

»Wäre es nicht das Beste, wenn ich mit Gerardi spräche und ihn bitten würde, er möge uns helfen. Eine ganze Nacht ist der Koffer in seinem Gewahrsam, und eine solche Zeit dürfte wohl dazu genügen, um das Schloß, und sei es auch noch so komplizierter Konstruktion, kunstgerecht zu öffnen und gegebenenfalls wieder zu schließen.«

Aber Henri Lessot riet ab.

»Noch nicht,« sagte er. »Gerardi liegt nichts daran, mit Afru in Konflikt zu geraten, und bloße Annahmen werden ihn gewiß nicht dazu bewegen, den ihm anvertrauten Koffer gewaltsam zu öffnen. – Anders wäre es natürlich, wenn wir beweisen könnten, Ihre Frau sei am letzten Abend mit dem Inder zusammen gewesen. Das ändert sofort die Situation und spielt uns mit einem Schlage alle Trümpfe in die Hand. Aber bis dahin müssen wir eben, so schwer es auch wird, warten ...«

Dr. Renee erhob sich und ging nervös auf dem Teppich auf und nieder. Er fühlte sich wie gefesselt, überall, wo man etwas tun wollte und konnte, stieß man gegen die Mauern des konventionellen Formenkrams, die die europäische Gesellschaft nach und nach um sich her aufgetürmt hatte.

»Was haben Sie für Nachrichten aus Paris?« fragte er schließlich stehenbleibend.

Der Detektiv zuckte bedauernd die Achseln.

»Meine Leute tun was sie können. Aber gerade, wo es am notwendigsten wäre, hört unsere Macht auf. Wir können zwar beobachten, wie Sanjo Afru sein Haus verläßt und ihn auch zum Teil auf seinen Wegen in der Stadt begleiten, was aber in seiner Wohnung geschieht, bleibt unerforschlich, ebenso wie die Milchglasfenster des Autos jeden Einblick verhindern. Überdies besitzt er mehrere ganz gleich aussehende Wagen, die in verschiedenen Garagen von Paris untergestellt sind, hat er also das Gefühl, verfolgt zu sein, so läßt er einfach sein Auto auf der einen Seite des Gebäudes stehen, in dem er zu tun hat, verläßt es durch Hintertüren und gelangt auf derlei Umwegen zu einem zweiten Wagen, der ihn in einer anderen Straße erwartet.«

»Haben Sie versucht, die Dienerschaft zu bestechen, oder, was noch besser wäre, einen Ihrer Kollegen als Hausangestellten in das Besitztum Afrus einzuschmuggeln?«

»Alles ist geschehen und alles fehlgeschlagen! – Der indische Türhüter, an den wir uns natürlich zuerst heranmachten, hörte alles mit stoischer Ruhe an, ließ sich sogar eine ansehnliche Summe geben, als sei er mit allem einverstanden, und warf dann das ganze Geld, ohne eine Miene zu verziehen, ein paar vorüberlungernden Bettlern vor die Füße.«

»Bleibt also als einziger Ausweg nur mein Plan, den Koffer aus Gerardis Villa zu rauben!«

Es war das erstemal, daß Renee diese Absicht Lessot mitteilte, und die Wirkung war eine dementsprechend große.

»Ist das Ihr Ernst ...! – Ich habe es satt, im Dunkeln zu tappen und bereits vorbereitende Schritte unternommen ...!« -

»Herr Renee! Sind Sie sich auch darüber klar, daß, wenn der Koffer nicht das enthält, was Sie voraussetzen – Ihre Handlung vom Gericht als Einbruchsdiebstahl bewertet wird!« -

»Auch das habe ich überlegt! – Aber ich bin mit meinen Nerven so herunter, daß ich es vorziehe, im Gefängnis zu sitzen, statt von dieser entsetzlichen Ungewißheit gemartert zu werden!« -

»Ich kann nicht mehr tun als Sie warnen!« sagte Lessot und erhob sich. »Schließlich muß jeder selbst wissen, was er tut! Und Sie werden es wohl auch nicht mißverstehen, daß ich mich persönlich an Ihrem Vorhaben nicht beteilige ...!«

Renee lächelte.

»Ich habe es auch nicht erwartet,« antwortete er verbindlich, »und habe nur die eine Bitte an Sie, auch für den Fall, daß ich verhaftet werden sollte, oder daß mir sonst etwas zustößt, Ihre Nachforschungen weiter fortsetzen zu wollen. Die nötigen Summen sind bei einem Rechtsanwalt deponiert.«

Es war mittlerweile elf Uhr geworden und Lessot empfahl sich. Renee begleitete ihn bis auf die Straße, winkte dann eine Autotaxe heran und fuhr zum Café Oriental, wo er von Juffo Neuigkeiten zu erfahren hoffte.

Aber er traf den Italiener nicht mehr an. Statt dessen begegnete ihm an der Tür der Kaschemme Erwin Gerardi, der sich von einem schlanken, rothaarigen Mädchen verabschiedete. Einen Augenblick maßen sich die beiden Männer mit beinahe feindlichen Blicken. Einen Augenblick nur! – Dann trat Erwin – gleichsam dem Gebot einer plötzlichen Eingebung folgend, auf den Arzt zu und sagte:

»Herr Dr. Renee! Ich glaube, es ist gut, daß wir uns getroffen haben! Jedenfalls gibt das auffallende Interesse, das Sie neuerdings meiner Person entgegenbringen, mir die Berechtigung, Sie um eine Aufklärung zu bitten!«

Der Arzt war so verblüfft, daß er nicht sofort antworten konnte.

»Ich verstehe nicht, was Sie meinen ...!« stieß er schließlich hervor.

Erwin machte Jeannette ein Zeichen, sich zu entfernen, trat dicht an Renee heran und flüsterte:

»Sie haben die Absicht, bei mir einzubrechen ...!?« – Und da der Arzt nicht antwortete: »Vielleicht würden Sie die Güte haben, mir zu erklären, was Sie in dem Koffer Sanjo Afrus vermuten!«

Dr. Renee begriff plötzlich, daß dieser Mann nicht etwa in feindlicher Absicht zu ihm sprach, sondern selbst danach trachtete, ein düsteres Geheimnis zu entwirren. Gleichzeitig wurde ihm klar, daß Juffo abgefaßt sein mußte und alles gestanden hatte. Es blieb ihm also nichts anderes übrig, als sich entweder mit Gerardi zu einigen oder aufs Schlimmste gefaßt zu sein.

»Wollen wir uns erst setzen ...,« sagte er schließlich, um Zeit zu gewinnen.

Sie ließen sich in derselben Nische nieder, in der Erwin mit Jeannette verhandelt hatte. Pierre brachte eine neue Flasche und zog sich dann diskret zurück. Auch er ahnte, daß hier schwerwiegende Dinge besprochen werden sollten.

Nach einer Weile beugte sich Dr. Renee so weit vor, daß sein Gesicht Erwin sehr nahe kam und sagte:

»Haben Sie nie den Argwohn gehabt, in dem Koffer des Inders befinde sich irgendein grausiges Geheimnis ...?« -

»Nein!«

Erwin log absichtlich, um nicht den Anschein zu erwecken, er habe irgendeine strafbare Handlung begünstigen wollen.

»Haben Sie aber geglaubt, daß der Koffer ausgerechnet nur Puppen enthalte ...?!« -

»Ich hatte bisher keinen nennenswerten Grund, etwas anderes anzunehmen. Und wenn ich es doch tat, so ging es mich schließlich nichts an, da es ja nicht mein Gepäckstück war ...« -

»Haben Sie beispielsweise nicht daran gedacht, daß dieser Koffer dazu da ist, um ... Leichen ... zu befördern!?«

Erwin überlief ein Grauen. Wollte ihn dieser Mensch ins Bockshorn jagen oder war sein Verstand durch das rätselhafte Verschwinden von Frau Elise getrübt worden?

»Sie belieben zu scherzen,« sagte er daher mit erzwungener Gleichgültigkeit. »Und ich kann Sie allerdings versichern, daß mir derartig phantastische Ideen nie gekommen sind!« -

»Die Idee ist nicht so phantastisch, wie es sich im ersten Augenblick anhört. – Ich nehme an, daß Sie von dem rätselhaften verschwinden meiner Frau gelesen haben ...?« -

»Natürlich. Und ich brauche Ihnen nicht zu versichern, daß mir dieser Unglücksfall sehr nahegegangen ist. Aber was hat das ...?« -

»Einen Augenblick, bitte. – Meine Frau ist in den letzten Tagen vor ihrem Verschwinden häufig in der Begleitung Ihres Freundes Afru gesehen worden!« -

»Hm!« -

»Am Abend nach ihrem Verschwinden traf das mysteriöse Auto hier ein und brachte den Koffer in Ihre Wohnung, von wo er am nächsten Morgen zum Indiendampfer transportiert wurde. – Können Sie abstreiten, daß unter diesen Umständen ein gewisser Verdacht ... na, sagen wir, sehr naheliegend ist ...?«

Erwin überlegte und mußte zugeben, daß die Gedankenverbindungen des Arztes nicht völlig aus der Luft gegriffen waren. – Anderseits aber: was sollte Afru davon haben, ein Weib zu töten, in den Koffer zu packen und nach Indien zu schicken. Menschenfresser gab es dort nicht und wenn dennoch der Verdacht eines Mordes gewesen wäre, hätte die Polizei längst auf einer Öffnung des Gepäckes bestanden, überhaupt – dergleichen las man höchstens in Romanen, während die Wirklichkeit keinen Raum mehr dafür hatte!

Als er diesen Erwägungen Ausdruck gab, entwaffnete ihn jedoch der Doktor durch einen neuen Einfall.

»Sie brauchen das Wort »Leiche« nicht buchstäblich zu nehmen,« sagte er. »Es gibt lebendige Leichname! – haben Sie nie von Mädchenhändlern gehört, die ihre Opfer betäuben, um sie auf diese Weise leichter transportieren zu können? – Wie, wenn die Puppen jenes sagenhaften Maharadscha von Sukentala, der übrigens, wie ich festgestellt habe, tatsächlich existiert und mit Afru in Verbindung steht, wie – wenn das in Wirklichkeit europäische Frauen sind?«

Der Doktor sah Erwin gespannt an, und konnte zu seiner Genugtuung feststellen, daß seine Worte zum erstenmal ihre Wirkung nicht verfehlt hatten.

»Was meinen Sie dazu ...?« flüsterte er daher erregt und hoffte, sein Gegenüber endlich für seine Absichten gewonnen zu haben.

Aber Erwin gab sich nicht so leicht aus der Hand. Bevor er sich daran machte, eine so heikle Angelegenheit aufzurühren, wollte er stichhaltige Beweise und nicht phantastische Vermutungen zur Verfügung haben. Jene aber konnte ihm erst Jeannette liefern.

»Vorläufig nichts,« antwortete er daher kühl. »Immerhin kann ich Ihnen zu Ihrer Beruhigung mitteilen, daß ich bereits Schritte eingeleitet habe, um selbst Klarheit über das Pariser Leben des Inders zu erhalten und daß ich gerne bereit bin, falls meine Beauftragten irgend etwas Positives ermitteln, die Öffnung des Koffers durch die Polizei zu veranlassen!« -

»Und Sie selbst würden diese Öffnung unter keinen Umständen vornehmen?« fragte Renee enttäuscht. »Ich kann Ihnen einen Schlosser verschaffen, der ein wahrer Künstler in seinem Fach ist und auf dessen Verschwiegenheit Sie sich unter allen Umständen verlassen können.«

Erwin schüttelte den Kopf.

»Derartiges kommt für mich nur in Betracht, wenn sich die Polizei weigert, die Öffnung auf meine Bitte vorzunehmen. Und ich kann mir nicht denken, daß das der Fall sein wird.«

Die Herren erhoben sich. Pierre stürzte herbei, half ihnen in die regenfeuchten Mäntel und nahm unter nicht endenwollenden Bücklingen noch einige Goldstücke in Empfang.

Vor der Tür sagte Erwin, bevor sie ihre Automobile bestiegen: »Sie brauchen mich nicht als Ihren Gegner zu betrachten, lieber Doktor. Sie können sich vielmehr darauf verlassen, daß ich im eigenen Interesse alles unternehmen werde, um die Lösung dieses seltsamen Rätsels zu erzwingen.«

Sie schüttelten sich die Hände und fuhren in verschiedener Richtung davon. Dr. Renee war zwar nicht befriedigt, hatte aber doch das beruhigende Gefühl, nunmehr die Angelegenheit in den Händen einer Persönlichkeit zu wissen, die, wenn auch nicht übermäßig schnell, so doch sicher und besonnen bis zum Ziel vordringen werde.

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-puppen-des-maharadscha-9072/9