de-en  Siegfried Bergengruen: Die Puppen des Maharadscha - 7. Kapitel - Ein merkwürdiger Zwischenfall
Chapter 7 - A peculiar incident.

Several months after that memorable visit of Sanjo Afru's, on a rainy autumn evening Erwin went from Place Castellane and down the Prado and arriving at his villa. It was almost dark, a cold, damp fog drifted through the streets and individual fallen leaves performed their dances on the gleaming wet asphalt.

A chill ran down the man's spine. He turned up the collar of his Ulster and strode faster. Suddenly he had the uncomfortable feeling of being followed by someone. Instinctively he turned around and noticed somebody in the distance who was apparently trying not to lose sight of him A peculiar feeling, somewhere between curiosity and apprehension, stirred in his chest

Who was that man?

He felt in his pocket for the gun, which he had routinely carried with him as a precaution since his financial successes, and then decided to walk on calmly for the time being. Having arrived in front of his villa, he assured himself that the stranger was still there, quickly unlocked the garden door and hid himself in a niche of the yard. After a few moments his follower also appeared, paced hesitantly back and forth in front of the lattice several times, and then also entered through the still open door. Again, he cautiously looked around for a while, then jumped over some borders to the wall and there, with the help of a flashlight, looked at the window of the room in which the black trunk was usually housed. However, his investigations didn't seem to be crowned by success, because he morosely shook his head, murmured something to himself and then returned to the street the same way.

As Erwin had watched the stranger hurrying towards the window, he immediately realized, that he had to be in some way connected to the matter of the trunk. For the time being it could not be gauged whether friendly or hostile, even though the latter was more likely. In any case, he decided not to arrest the untrustworthy fellow there and then, but to observe him unobtrusively on his part for now in the hope of uncovering any important connections.

So when the stranger had reached the sidewalk, he hurried after him, crossed the Prado and accompanied him unnoticed on the other side of the boulevard.

It was a long, uncomfortable hike to which he had subjected himself. The rain no longer sprayed in fine shrouds from the sky, but flooded down in streams and began to soften his shoes. The storm howled dully, shook trees and shutters and made the sea thunder from the harbour quarter. But that's exactly where the fellow was directing his steps. The alleys he used became narrower and narrower and more and more angular, he crept along the walls of the weathered houses, which became more and more crooked. ... Finally he ducked into the black yawning abysm of an archway and disappeared. ...

It was good that Erwin knew every nook and cranny in this area from his adventurous past, he had also made trips here during which he learned to gamble and to love the danger, and there were cellar pubs and dives all around where he had been a daily and much-anticipated guest at the time.

He knew very well what lay behind the darkness of the abysmal gate which had swallowed the man he had followed. Several fathoms below the ground there was the most infamous premises of Marseille's gangster and grisette world, the Café Oriental!

For a moment he was undecided whether he should also use this unofficial entrance or rather the "parade door", which was situated on another street, but decided on the former and haphazardly groped his way into the darkness.

At first he had a damp, musty smelling wall on the right as a base, but then it retreated, which convinced him that he was in the courtyard, from which several steps had to lead to a hidden cellar corridor. But before he could go on a search for this cellar, two figures suddenly jumped at him and grabbed him by the arms, while a hoarse voice hissed into his ear: "What are you looking for here?" - "The Café Oriental and certainly not you!" - "Baloney! You wanted to snoop around!“ - „Me? I could say the same thing about you, gentlemen!" Before the astonished blokes could answer, he thrust a fist into the center of one man's chest and kicked the other man so hard that he groaned and staggered backwards.

He was free for the moment.

In a flash, he whipped out his flashlight, which he had previously avoided using so as not to attract attention, turned it on, looked at the cellar shaft in the harsh reflected light and jumped in, slamming and locking the swollen door behind him.

Right! Phew! That's done! - But he absolutely had to resume his boxing training, which he had neglected since wealth and marriage had befallen him. His limbs no longer had the same suppleness as before.

With just a few steps he passed the underground passage, crossed a basement room, whose floor was lined with bricks, and knocked on a dripping, rusty iron door, in which a key was stuck from the other side

Knock, knock, knock... boomed his blows. Knock, knock, knock ...! Three times short and then twice long: ... bangggg, bangggg ...! That was the old secret knock.

In fact, someone sneaked on slippers and silently turned the key. The door opened.

"Well I never!" growled the man who had opened him threateningly. "Who the devil are you? - I've never seen this one!" But Erwin knew him and that was the main thing.

"You don't know me!?" he called out reproachfully. "You don't know me!? - Well, that beats it all!! You don't know me, and I took at least twelve francs in cash from those fellows at the last poker game!" The man stared at him as if he came from another world.

"It's been quite a while, though!" Erwin continued, "perhaps a year or even longer. You can't forget your old friends because of that. Don't you remember Jacques here?" Now the bouncer slowly but surely saw the light. ...

"So, you are Jacques!" he grunted calmly and, out of sheer joy, hit Erwin on the shoulder, he almost collapsed underneath. "Who would have thought this would be possible, anyway! Little Jacques with the funny German name, which we could never pronounce and which we therefore renamed Jacques! To think I was able to forget you like that! - But that has to do with the fact that you have become finer and have a more elegant outfit while you used to be more appropriately dressed. Yes, yes ... Well, you've probably been grifting without getting put behind bars! ... - Yes, one man succeeds, the other doesn't! - - But we always thought highly of you! Now come in, the boys will be happy and the redhead Jeanette you loved back then is still there..." - "Maybe later," Erwin Gerardi replied, and prevented Pierre, the janitor from opening a door, behind which, music and the shrill babble of voices could be heard. "First I'd like to speak with you alone for a couple of minutes. It's about a confidential matter." He felt in his pocket, brought out a ten franc piece and slid it into Pierre's little hand, eagerly open and full of promise.

He threw the coin against a large stone, bit at it like a predator a few times and finally slipped it away, satisfied.

"Go ahead," he said. "I am at your service!" - "Right, first thing's first... Did a man come through this door ten minutes ago?" - "A man? - Wait a second. - Of course! The little Italian chap Juffo who you chased with the rope-end off the "Viktor Emanuel" a few months ago because he was sniffing around the contents of the passengers' baggage!" - "Hm. And? - What is this Juffo up to?" - "No good, clearly! - He has no talent, you know! No matter what he does, no good ever comes of it. But you are a different fellow altogether! Anyway, now he's boasting about something or other but... I don't know, that Juffo! ... you know what he's like...!" - "Don't you have a rough idea what it might be about?" Pierre narrowed one eye and looked furtively at Erwin.

"Didn't you go about under the cops?" he asked.

"You're nuts, my dear boy. - I'd have better things to do than to venture into the realm of your delicate hands! Nah... , I'd rather not! But to get back to Juffo - - I am curious about this fellow!!" - "Why?" - "Because he is interested in me! Speaking of which! Don't you find it somewhat strange that a good half hour ago I happened to have the opportunity to watch him subject a ground floor window of my apartment to a close inspection ...? !" - "Your apartment? Off all things! - - Just you wait! The best thing is, I'll send the fellow in for a moment, then you could talk quietly and undisturbed!" Pierre disappeared into the room from which the noise sounded. It took quite a while until he came back - apparently he had difficulties with Juffo, - but when this finally happened, he pushed a slim, brown man, whose shaggy hair was hanging in his unwashed face, in front of him and said patronizingly: "Well, there you are, my dear ones! - I won't disturb you!" So the two men were alone. Erwin fixed the Italian for a while and then said sharply: "You know me ...?" Juffo looked at him and nodded his head lively.

"Who am I?" - "The millionaire Gerardi!" - "Hm. Here, I'll give you twenty francs. - Do you want to tell me why you followed me today and then went into my yard?" Juffo became very pale-faced. Apparently the discovery of Gerardis was not at all pleasant for him. He looked around the room shyly, as if looking for a way to escape.

Erwin observed this searching look, reached into his pocket and lay his revolver and two ten franc pieces in front of him on the table.

"If you try to bolt, I will shoot you," he said soberly, "if you tell the truth and conceivably work for me, you'll get these twenty francs for now and a set fee later on. So, what do you think?" Juffo thought about it for a while, as if he needed to understand the situation properly first, then he sighed with resignation and asked "Do you know Dr. Renee . . . ?" "Of course, everybody knows Dr. Renee. Isn't that the one whose wife disappeared without a trace in Paris a few months ago?" "I don't know anything about that. - In any case, he lives at 101 Rue Bergere. One day this Dr. Renee turned up here in Café Oriental and sat down at my table. We talked for a while about this and that and he soon realised that my situation wasn't the best and so he asked me if I wanted to do him a service. For a fee, of course! I agreed, as long as it wouldn't be too difficult. He laughed at me and explained that it was simply a matter of observing the doings of two people." "I am of course one of them, and the other?" "Is supposedly an Indian, by the name of Sanjo Afru, who comes here from Paris now and then in a dark blue Limousine, who also regularly carries a black case around with him which is unloaded at your place."

"Hm. And what else . . .?" "Nothing else. But these details are of great interest to Dr. Renee, and every time I have reported that car and case have arrived, he has given me between thirty and fifty francs. Last time he even offered me one hundred francs if I managed to saw through the iron bars on one of your ground-floor windows, so that the case could be covertly carried off during the night!" "Good lord! Is that true?" "Yes, indeed. - I was also surprised that such a refined, distinguished gentleman wanted to become a criminal because of a ragged trunk, but when I told him that, he just smiled strangely and replied, I just didn't understand that." - "What kind of objects does the doctor presume are in the trunk?" - "Yes, I don't know that. - He never said anything about it. In any case it is something very special, otherwise he would probably not make such an effort to get possession of the piece of luggage ...". Erwin thought about it. For a moment he had the idea of going to Dr. Renee and asking him for clarification. But that was impossible. Dr. Renee would never believe that Erwin himself doesn't know anything specific about the contents of the suitcase. He would instead get wind of a trap behind such a visit and become even more suspicious. So for the time being he had to let things run their course, but keep an eye on everything Dr. Renee did. Juffo by all accounts was the right person for the job.

Erwin put his revolver away, took a fifty franc note out of his wallet and pushed the money towards the Italian.

"Here," he said quietly whilst doing so, "a little something to start with. I hope it's enough. You'll receive this amount from me every week, but in return you are required to keep me constantly informed of every single thing that the the doctor does. Every single detail, you understand! I don't want to be in for any first-hand and unpleasant surprises. The Doctor mustn't have the slightest inkling of any of this, otherwise the entire game is up." Juffo grabbed greedily at the bill, looked at it warily for a moment and then stuffed it into one of his roomy trouser pockets in one swift movement, as though he was afraid that his treasure might be snatched away from him again. He had become even paler than usual, but his eyes looked up admiringly and thankfully to Erwin.

"Everything shall be done as Sir orders ...!" he whispered cringingly.

"Very well, very well. I wouldn't advise you to do the converse anyhow. A hint from me to the prefect and you and your doctor will be behind bars!" The man winced and raised his hands defensively. This prospect certainly seemed uninviting to him. Erwin could be sure that he would fulfill his obligations on time.

That ended the conversation. Erwin opened the door to the rooms of the café', and Juffo slipped past him with cat-like agility, bowing deeply and disappeared into the hustle and bustle of the pub. Pierre stepped out from behind the bar and met the infrequent guest.

"Well, my waiter ... everything going according to plan?" Erwin nodded.

"I'm satisfied. But keep an eye on the guy and occasionally tell me what kind of company he keeps. I've asked him to do my bidding." He slid a couple gold pieces into Pierre's hopefully opened paws. He pocketed the coins with a smile on his face and then whistled softly, repeating it several times.

The next moment Erwin felt a gentle touch on his shoulder. He turned around and was facing a tall, slender girl whose alabaster-white face was enblazoned with a wave of red hair.

"Jeannette ...!" he gushed out in astonishment, "Jeannette ...! you are still here, too...?" - "Where else might I be?" she smiled. "here ... at least there's some life here, you know, excitement, danger... like I love it. Pierre admittedly says I ought to get married, but boo ... The men who let themselves be married ...!" - "Are not to your taste, Jeannette ... right? I know it. - By the way, I also got married." - You?", she looked at him in astonishment. " At least, is she pretty, your wife...?" " - "It's all right." - He laughed. "Or do you think I would have chosen an ugly woman? You spoiled me too much for that!" She blushed with joy.

"Come along," she said and seized his hand. "There's a free booth in the corner. You do have half an hour for me, don't you?“ Without waiting for his answer, she dragged him with her. Grinning, Pierre followed them with his eyes, scratched himself behind his ears with satisfaction and shuffled off into the cellar to look for one of the cheaper bottles to set before the pair.

For an instant Erwin was reluctant to follow the girl to the table. He no longer attached any importance of being part of the taverns' in-crowd, which had earlier seemed to him appealing and attractive in its colourful adventurousness. But then all of a sudden a thought came through his mind! How about making Jeanette his confidante and beg her to find out the secret of the black trunk. As a woman it had to be easier for her to succeed, because, in the right circumstances, she would be able to worm her way close to Afru without that being his intention. Besides, there was probably no one else who was more suited to trace the mysterious doings of the Indian as Jeanette, who had spent her whole life in such an environment, where the execution and concealment of such crimes were an integral part of the fabric of daily life.

Pierre brought a dusty bottle and put it on the dirty tabletop. In addition two ungainly aluminium cups. Glasses were proscribed in this restaurant for obvious reasons.

"Drink, my little chicks," the old grifter grunted slylyly. "That's a drop, like you seldom get in Maison Dorée." He shuffled off. Jeannette filled the cups. They drank in silence for a while, while Erwin watched the strange hustle and bustle of the people around him. Two thirds of them were criminals and dealers in stolen goods, whose well defined bony faces were etched with the deep furrows of excessive pleasure, here and there a few strangers were also to be seen. They were mostly painters or writers who were doing their studies. In a niche near the exit, two policemen, known to everyone, were sitting with apparent indifference and drinking a cheap port wine.

"What a peculiar lot!" Erwin thought, and it seemed strange to him that only recently he had been a regular evening guest here and considered one of them.

He turned his attention back to the woman who was leaning languidly towards him and looking expectantly at him with black-lined eyes. She had a peculiar attraction and Erwin could imagine that her sinuous, cat-like nature, with the help of the appropriate dress, would not fail to have the desired effect upon pampered men. At the moment however, she was only dressed in a shabby, bilious green pullover and a short skirt, whilst her fantastic legs were enclosed in high lace-up boots. She held a cigarette crookedly in her mouth and every now and then blew the smoke with a soft hissing out between her scarlet painted lips.

Erwin bent a little forward and said in an undertone: "Jeanette, how is it . . .? Are you bound in any way . . .? She looked at him in astonishment, obviously she had not expected this question and replied hesitantly: "I don't know what you mean . . .?" "I mean whether you would be prepared to leave, not only these people here, but also Marseille, whether you have any sort of commitment." Jeanette did not answer immediately but first took a deep draught on her almost burnt out cigarette, blew the smoke out through her nose with closed eyes and then crushed the stub laboriously on a lead dish. In any event she was considering the pros and cons.

"Naturally I have commitments . . ." she said haughtily, "but there is no obstacle to speak of which would prevent me from releasing myself from these bonds . . ." "Is it enough, if I offer you a sum of ten thousand francs per month and in return ask that you move to an apartment in Paris for the time being?" Erwin had not expected that these words would have such an effect. Jeanette sprang up with a cry of pleasure, twirled around crazily several times, and then fell upon Erwin and covered his face with rapturous kisses. It was only with difficulty that he was able to calm her down and press her to sit back in her place.

" You havent't heard yet, what I am demanding for that sum", he said, to dampen her enthusiasm

Jeannette laughed hysterically.

"What you're demanding? - Demand, what you want! Ten thousand francs remain ten thousand francs... and also in Paris! - But you are right, i behave like a teenager ... please excuse me ... the size of the amount took off a part of my sense ...!" She drank a whole cup of the heavy wine as if it were water and then calmed down a bit.

" Keep talking," she asked.

And Erwin talked. Everything. Neither did he make a secret of the strange interest of Dr. Renee, whose wife had disappeared a few months ago in Paris. You, Jeanette, the most cunning of all of Marseille's grisettes are no called for to obtain the Indian's confidence and to lift the dark veil this man is weaving around his actions.

"I don't want to persuade you to take on the job," Erwin ended his explanations, "for there is reason to believe that you place yourself in danger. So have a think about it till . . ." But Jeanette did not let him finish.

"Think about...? -It seems, you have forgotten, that I am the " Red Jeanette". There is nothing to consider. Without danger, this whole story wouldn't have any appeal to me. And if it's all right with you, I'll go to Paris tomorrow!"
unit 1
Kapitel 7 - Ein merkwürdiger Zwischenfall.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 4
Ein Frösteln überlief den Mann.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 5
Er klappte den Kragen seines Ulsters hoch und schritt schneller aus.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 6
Plötzlich aber hatte er das unangenehme Empfinden, daß ihn jemand verfolge.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 9
Wer war jener Mann?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 19
Es war eine lange, ungemütliche Wanderung, der er sich ausgesetzt hatte.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 22
Dorthin aber gerade lenkte der Bursche seine Schritte.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 31
Sie wollten spionieren!« - »Ich?
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 33
Für den Augenblick war er frei.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 35
So!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 36
Uff!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 37
Das wäre geschafft!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 39
Seine Glieder wiesen doch nicht mehr ganz dieselbe Geschmeidigkeit auf wie früher.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 41
Bung, bung, bung ... dröhnten seine Schläge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 42
Bung, bung, bung ...!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 43
Dreimal kurz und dann zweimal lang: ... bungggg, bungggg ...!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 44
Das war das alte Zeichen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 45
unit 46
Auf ging die Tür.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 47
»Nanu!« knurrte der Mann, der ihm öffnete, drohend.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 48
»Wer sind denn Sie?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 49
unit 50
»Du kennst mich nicht!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 51
?« rief er vorwurfsvoll.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 52
»Du kennst mich nicht!?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 53
– Also, da hört doch alles auf!!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 56
Aber deswegen vergißt man doch alte Freunde nicht.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 59
»Wer hätte das auch für möglich gehalten!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 61
Daß ich dich so vergessen konnte!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 64
– Ja, dem einen gelingt's, dem anderen nicht!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 65
– – Aber wir haben immer auf dich große Stücke gehalten!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 67
»Zuerst möchte ich mich zwei Minuten mit dir allein unterhalten.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 70
»Bitte«, sagte er.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 72
– Warte mal.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 73
– Natürlich!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 75
So?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 76
– Was macht dieser Juffo für Geschäfte?« - »Schlechte, natürlich!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 77
– Er hat kein Talent, weißt du!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 78
So viel er sich auch Mühe gibt, es kommt nichts Gescheites heraus.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 79
Da bist du doch ein ganz anderer Kerl!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 80
Jetzt allerdings prahlt er da mit irgendeiner Sache, aber ... na, der Juffo!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 82
»Bist du auch nicht etwa unter die Polypen gegangen?« fragte er.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 83
»Du bist verrückt, mein Lieber.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 85
Nee ..., lieber nicht!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 86
Aber, um auf Juffo zurückzukommen – –, der Kerl interessiert mich!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 87
!« - »Warum?« - »Weil ich ihn interessiere!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 88
Apropos!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 90
!« - »Deiner Wohnung?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 91
Ausgerechnet!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 92
– – Na, warte!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 95
– Ich werde euch nicht stören!« Die beiden Männer waren also allein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 97
»Wer bin ich denn?« - »Der Millionär Gerardi!« - »Hm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 98
– Ich gebe Ihnen hier zwanzig Franken.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 100
Scheinbar war ihm die Entdeckung Gerardis durchaus nicht angenehm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 101
Er sah sich scheu im Raume um, als suche er einen Weg, um entwischen zu können.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 107
– Jedenfalls wohnt er an der Rue Bergere 101.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 110
Gegen Bezahlung natürlich!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 111
– Ich sagte zu, falls die Sache nicht zu schwierig sei.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 113
»Hm.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 114
Und weiter ...?« - »Weiter nichts.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 117
Ist das wahr?« - »Jawohl.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 119
– Darüber hat er sich nie ausgesprochen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 122
Aber das ging nicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 123
unit 126
Dazu war Juffo allem Anschein nach die geeignete Persönlichkeit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 128
»Hier,« sagte er dabei leise, »hier diese Kleinigkeit für den Anfang.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 129
Ich hoffe, es genügt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 131
Sie verstehen, auf das Genaueste!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 132
Ich will keinen persönlichen und unliebsamen Überraschungen ausgesetzt sein.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 135
unit 136
»Gut, gut.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 137
Ich möchte Ihnen auch nicht zu dem Gegenteil raten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 139
Diese Aussicht erschien ihm auf keinen Fall verlockend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 140
Erwin konnte sicher sein, daß er seine Obliegenheiten pünktlich erfüllen werde.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 141
Damit war diese Aussprache beendet.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 143
Pierre trat hinter dem Schanktisch hervor und kam dem seltenen Gast entgegen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 144
»Nun, mein Kellner ... alles nach Wunsch?« Erwin nickte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 145
»Ich bin zufrieden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 149
Im nächsten Augenblick fühlte sich Erwin leicht an der Schulter berührt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 151
»Jeannette ...!« stieß er erstaunt hervor, »Jeannette ...!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 152
du bist auch noch hier ...?« - »Wo sollte ich sonst sein ...?« lächelte sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 154
Pierre sagt zwar, ich solle heiraten, aber pah ...
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 156
Ich weiß es.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 157
– Übrigens auch ich habe geheiratet.« - »Du?«, sie sah ihn verwundert an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 158
»Ist sie wenigstens hübsch, deine Frau ...?« - »Es geht.« – Er lachte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 159
»Oder meinst du, daß ich eine häßliche Frau genommen hätte?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 160
Dazu hattest du mich doch zu sehr verwöhnt!« Sie wurde rot vor Freude.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 161
»Komm,« sagte sie und ergriff seine Hand.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 162
»Dort in der Ecke ist eine freie Nische.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 165
Einen Augenblick widerstrebte es Erwin, dem Mädchen an den Tisch zu folgen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 167
Dann aber durchzuckte ihn urplötzlich ein Gedanke!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 171
unit 172
Dazu zwei plumpe Aluminiumbecher.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 173
Gläser waren in diesem Lokal aus naheliegenden Gründen verpönt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 174
»Trinkt, meine Kinderchen, ...«, grunzte der alte Gauner verschlagen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 176
Jeannette goß die Becher voll.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 179
Meist Maler oder Schriftsteller, die ihre Studien machten.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 186
unit 188
Jedenfalls überlegte sie das Für und Wider.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 191
Er konnte sie nur mit Mühe beruhigen und auf ihren Platz zurückdrängen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 193
Jeannette lachte hysterisch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 194
»Was du verlangst?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 195
– Verlang was du willst!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 196
Zehntausend Franken bleiben zehntausend Franken ... und dazu noch in Paris!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 198
»Erzähle weiter!« bat sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 199
Und Erwin erzählte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 200
Alles.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 204
unit 205
Ȇberlegen ...?
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 206
– Es scheint, du hast vergessen, daß ich die »Rote Jeannette« bin.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 207
Es gibt nichts zu überlegen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 208
Ohne Gefahr hätte die ganze Geschichte für mich keinen Reiz.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 209
Und wenn es dir recht ist, fahre ich morgen nach Paris!«
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago

Kapitel 7 - Ein merkwürdiger Zwischenfall.

Mehrere Monate nach jenem denkwürdigen Besuch Sanjo Afrus ging Erwin an einem regnerischen Herbstabend vom Place Castellane kommend den Prado hinab, um seine Villa zu erreichen. Es war fast dunkel, feuchte, kalte Nebel trieben durch die Straßen und einzelne herabgewehte Blätter führten auf dem glänzenden, nassen Asphalt ihre Tänze auf.

Ein Frösteln überlief den Mann. Er klappte den Kragen seines Ulsters hoch und schritt schneller aus. Plötzlich aber hatte er das unangenehme Empfinden, daß ihn jemand verfolge. Unwillkürlich drehte er sich um und bemerkte in einiger Entfernung einen Menschen, der sich scheinbar bemühte, ihn nicht aus den Augen zu verlieren. Ein merkwürdiges Gefühl, das aus einem Gemisch von Neugierde und Besorgnis bestand, erwachte in seinem Herzen.

Wer war jener Mann?

Er tastete in der Tasche nach der Waffe, die er seit seinen finanziellen Erfolgen aus Vorsichtsgründen immer bei sich trug, und entschloß sich dann, vorläufig ruhig weiterzugehen. Vor seiner Villa angelangt, überzeugte er sich, daß der Fremde noch da war, schloß schnell das Gartentor auf und verbarg sich in einer Nische des Hofes. Nach wenigen Augenblicken erschien auch sein Verfolger, ging mehrere Male zögernd vor dem Gitter auf und nieder und trat dann ebenfalls durch das offengebliebene Tor ein. Auch hier schaute er sich erst eine Weile vorsichtig um, sprang dann über einige Rabatten bis an die Hauswand und betrachtete dort mit Hilfe einer Taschenlampe das Fenster des Zimmers, in dem gewöhnlich der schwarze Koffer untergebracht wurde. Indessen schienen seine Ermittlungen von keinem Erfolge gekrönt zu sein, denn er schüttelte mißmutig den Kopf, brummte auch etwas vor sich hin und begab sich dann auf demselben Wege auf die Straße zurück.

Als Erwin den Fremden auf das Fenster hatte zuhuschen sehen, war es ihm sofort klar, daß er irgendwie mit der Kofferangelegenheit in Verbindung stehen mußte. Ob freundlich oder feindlich, ließ sich vorläufig zwar nicht ermessen, immerhin aber war das letztere mehr anzunehmen. Jedenfalls beschloß er, den wenig vertrauenerweckenden Burschen nicht etwa an Ort und Stelle dingfest zu machen, sondern ihn nun seinerseits zu beobachten, um, ohne Aufsehen zu erregen, Zusammenhänge von Wichtigkeit aufzudecken.

So eilte er denn, als der Fremde den Bürgersteig gewonnen hatte, hinter ihm her, überquerte den Prado und begleitete ihn unbemerkt auf der anderen Seite des Boulevards.

Es war eine lange, ungemütliche Wanderung, der er sich ausgesetzt hatte. Der Regen sprühte nicht mehr in feinen Schleiern vom Himmel, sondern flutete in Strömen herab und begann sein Schuhzeug aufzuweichen. Dumpf heulte der Sturm, schüttelte Bäume und Fensterläden und ließ das Meer vom Hafenviertel her donnern. Dorthin aber gerade lenkte der Bursche seine Schritte. Immer enger und winkeliger wurden die Gassen, die er benutzte, immer windschiefer die verwitterten Häuser, an deren Mauern er entlang schlich. Schließlich duckte er sich in den schwarzgähnenden Schlund eines Torbogens und war verschwunden.

Es war gut, daß Erwin von seiner abenteuerlichen Vergangenheit her in dieser Gegend jeden Winkel kannte, hierher hatte er auch jene Ausflüge unternommen, in deren Verlauf er das Hasard spielen und lieben lernte, hier ringsum lagen die Kellerkneipen und Kaschemmen, in denen er damals täglicher und gerngesehener Gast gewesen war.

Er wußte genau, was die dunkle Tiefe des Torschlundes barg, die den von ihm verfolgten Mann verschluckt hatte. Dort lag etliche Klafter unter der Erde das berüchtigtste Lokal der Verbrecher- und Grisettenwelt Marseilles, das Café Oriental!

Einen Augenblick war er unschlüssig, ob er ebenfalls diesen inoffiziellen Eingang oder lieber die »Paradetür«, die an einer anderen Straße gelegen war, benutzen sollte, entschloß sich aber zu dem ersteren und tappte auf gut Glück in die Finsternis hinein.

Anfangs hatte er rechts eine feuchte, moderig riechende Wand als Stützpunkt, dann aber wich diese zurück, was ihn davon überzeugte, daß er sich auf dem Hofe, von dem etliche Stufen in einem versteckten Kellergang führen mußten, befand. Ehe er sich jedoch noch auf die Suche nach diesem Keller begeben konnte, sprangen plötzlich zwei Gestalten auf ihn zu und packten ihn an den Armen, während ihm eine heisere Stimme in das Ohr zischte:

»Was suchen Sie hier?« -

»Das Café Oriental und gewiß nicht Sie!« -

»Unsinn! Sie wollten spionieren!« -

»Ich? Dasselbe könnte ich von Ihnen behaupten, meine Herren!«

Ehe die verblüfften Kerle antworten konnten, stieß er dem einen die Faust in die Herzgrube und versetzte dem anderen einen solchen Fußtritt, daß er aufstöhnend zurücktaumelte.

Für den Augenblick war er frei.

Blitzschnell riß er seine Taschenlampe heraus, deren Benutzung er, um nicht aufzufallen, bisher vermieden hatte, knipste sie an, erblickte in ihrem grellen Lichtspiegel den Kellerschacht und sprang hinein, die verquollene Tür hinter sich zuschlagend und verriegelnd.

So! Uff! Das wäre geschafft! – Aber er mußte unbedingt wieder sein Boxtraining aufnehmen, den er, seitdem Reichtum und Ehe über ihn hereingebrochen waren, vernachlässigt hatte. Seine Glieder wiesen doch nicht mehr ganz dieselbe Geschmeidigkeit auf wie früher.

Mit wenigen Schritten durchmaß er den unterirdischen Gang, durchquerte einen Kellerraum, dessen Boden mit Backsteinen ausgelegt war und klopfte an eine triefende, verrostete Eisentür, in der von der anderen Seite ein Schlüssel stak.

Bung, bung, bung ... dröhnten seine Schläge. Bung, bung, bung ...! Dreimal kurz und dann zweimal lang: ... bungggg, bungggg ...! Das war das alte Zeichen.

Tatsächlich, jemand schlürfte auf Pantoffeln heran und drehte lautlos den Schlüssel um. Auf ging die Tür.

»Nanu!« knurrte der Mann, der ihm öffnete, drohend. »Wer sind denn Sie? – So einen kenn ich ja gar nicht!«

Aber Erwin kannte ihn und das war die Hauptsache.

»Du kennst mich nicht!?« rief er vorwurfsvoll. »Du kennst mich nicht!? – Also, da hört doch alles auf!! Du kennst mich nicht, und dabei habe ich den Kerlen bei der letzten Pokerpartie mindestens zwölf Franken in bar abgenommen!«

Der Mann stierte ihn an, als käme er aus einer anderen Welt.

»Es ist allerdings schon eine ganze Weile her!« fuhr Erwin fort, »vielleicht ein Jährchen oder auch etwas darüber. Aber deswegen vergißt man doch alte Freunde nicht. Mensch, kennt ihr denn hier den Jacques nicht mehr?«

Nun ging des Hauses Hüter langsam, aber sicher ein Talglicht auf.

»Also der Jacques bist du!« grunzte er beruhigt und hieb Erwin aus lauter Freude eins auf die Schulter, daß er fast darunter zusammenbrach. »Wer hätte das auch für möglich gehalten! Der kleine Jacques mit dem komischen deutschen Namen, den wir nie aussprechen konnten und den wir darum in Jacques umtauften! Daß ich dich so vergessen konnte! – – Aber das macht, du bist feiner geworden und hast eine vornehme Kluft an, während du früher standesgemäßer gekleidet gingst. Ja, ja ... Nun, du hast gewiß ein paar schwere Kisten gedreht, ohne hinter schwedische Gardinen zu kommen! – Ja, dem einen gelingt's, dem anderen nicht! – – Aber wir haben immer auf dich große Stücke gehalten! – Nun komm herein, die Jungen werden sich freuen und die rote Jeanette, die du damals liebtest, ist auch noch da ...« -

»Vielleicht später«, antwortete Erwin Gerardi und verhinderte, daß Pierre, der Hauswart, eine Tür öffnete, hinter der sich Musik und wüstes Stimmengewirr hören ließ. »Zuerst möchte ich mich zwei Minuten mit dir allein unterhalten. Es handelt sich nämlich um eine Vertrauenssache«

Er griff in die Tasche, förderte ein Zehnfrankstück zutage und ließ es in Pierres willig geöffnete und vielversprechende Tatze gleiten.

Der warf die Münze auf einen großen Stein, probierte dann mehrmals sein Raubtiergebiß an ihr und steckte sie schließlich befriedigt ein.

»Bitte«, sagte er. »Ich stehe zu deinen Diensten!« -

»Also, erstmals ... Ist hier durch diese Tür vor zehn Minuten ein Mann eingetreten?« -

»Ein Mann? – Warte mal. – Natürlich! Der kleine Italiener Juffo, den sie vor einigen Monaten mit dem Tauende von Bord des »Viktor Emanuel« gejagt haben, weil er sich für den Inhalt des Passagiergepäcks interessierte!« -

»Hm. So? – Was macht dieser Juffo für Geschäfte?« -

»Schlechte, natürlich! – Er hat kein Talent, weißt du! So viel er sich auch Mühe gibt, es kommt nichts Gescheites heraus. Da bist du doch ein ganz anderer Kerl! Jetzt allerdings prahlt er da mit irgendeiner Sache, aber ... na, der Juffo! ... wir kennen ihn ja ...!« -

»Weißt du nicht annähernd, um was für eine Sache es sich handelt?«

Pierre kniff ein Auge zusammen und sah Erwin lauernd an.

»Bist du auch nicht etwa unter die Polypen gegangen?« fragte er.

»Du bist verrückt, mein Lieber. – Ich hätte dann auch Besseres zu tun, als mich in das Bereich deiner zarten Hände zu wagen! Nee ..., lieber nicht! Aber, um auf Juffo zurückzukommen – –, der Kerl interessiert mich!!« -

»Warum?« -

»Weil ich ihn interessiere! Apropos! Findest du es nicht einigermaßen merkwürdig, daß ich vor einer guten halben Stunde zufälligerweise Gelegenheit hatte, zuzusehen, wie er ein Erdgeschoßfenster meiner Wohnung einer genauen Visitation unterwarf ...?!« -

»Deiner Wohnung? Ausgerechnet! – – Na, warte! Das beste ist, ich schicke dir den Kerl mal ein bißchen herein, dann könntet ihr euch ja in aller Ruhe und ganz ungestört aussprechen!«

Pierre verschwand in dem Raum, aus dem der Lärm hereinklang. Es dauerte eine ganze Weile, bis er wiederkam – scheinbar hatte er mit Juffo Schwierigkeiten, – als das dann aber schließlich geschah, schob er einen schmächtigen, braunen Menschen, dem das zottelige Haar ins ungewaschene Gesicht hing, vor sich her und sagte gönnerhaft:

»Da habt ihr euch, meine Lieben! – Ich werde euch nicht stören!«

Die beiden Männer waren also allein. Erwin fixierte den Italiener eine Weile und sagte dann scharf:

»Sie kennen mich ...?«

Juffo sah ihn an und nickte lebhaft mit dem Kopfe.

»Wer bin ich denn?« -

»Der Millionär Gerardi!« -

»Hm. – Ich gebe Ihnen hier zwanzig Franken. – Wollen Sie mir nun erzählen, warum Sie mich heute verfolgt haben und nachher in meinen Hof gegangen sind?«

Juffo wurde sehr blaß. Scheinbar war ihm die Entdeckung Gerardis durchaus nicht angenehm. Er sah sich scheu im Raume um, als suche er einen Weg, um entwischen zu können.

Erwin bemerkte diesen Blick, griff in die Tasche und legte seinen Revolver und zwei Zehnfrankenstücke vor sich auf den Tisch.

»Wenn Sie ausreißen, knalle ich Sie nieder,« sagte er dabei ruhig, »wenn Sie die Wahrheit erzählen und evtl. in meine Dienste treten, erhalten Sie vorläufig noch diese zwanzig Franken und späterhin ein festes Honorar. Also bitte ...?«

Juffo dachte eine Weile nach, als müsse er sich erst mal über die Situation klar werden, seufzte dann ergeben auf und fragte:

»Sie kennen Dr. Renee ...?« -

»Gewiß, wer sollte den nicht kennen. Das ist doch derselbe, dessen Gattin vor einigen Monaten spurlos in Paris verschwand?« -

»Davon weiß ich nichts. – Jedenfalls wohnt er an der Rue Bergere 101. Dieser Dr. Renee erschien eines Tages hier im Café Oriental und setzte sich an meinen Tisch. Wir unterhielten uns eine Weile über dies und das, er hatte bald heraus, daß es mit mir nicht zum Besten stand und fragte mich daraufhin, ob ich ihm vielleicht einen Dienst leisten wolle. Gegen Bezahlung natürlich! – Ich sagte zu, falls die Sache nicht zu schwierig sei. – Er lachte mich aus und erklärte, es handele sich nur darum, zwei Persönlichkeiten, für deren Tun und Lassen er sich interessiere, zu beobachten ...« -

»Ich bin natürlich die eine Persönlichkeit, und die andere?« -

»Ist ein angeblicher Indier, Sanjo Afru mit Namen, der hierher zuweilen aus Paris in einer dunkelblauen Limousine herüberkommt, die dann regelmäßig einen schwarzen Koffer mit sich führt, der in Ihrem Hofe abgeladen wird.«.

»Hm. Und weiter ...?« -

»Weiter nichts. – Aber alle diese Einzelheiten interessieren den Dr. Renee sehr, und jedesmal, wenn ich ihm berichten konnte, Auto und Koffer seien angekommen, schenkte er mir dreißig bis fünfzig Franken. Das letztemal nun bot er mir sogar hundert Franken, wenn ich es fertig bekäme, die Eisengitter an dem betreffenden Erdgeschoßfenster Ihrer Wohnung durchzufeilen, damit man den Koffer in der Nacht heimlich entführen könne!« -

»Donnerwetter! Ist das wahr?« -

»Jawohl. – Ich wunderte mich auch, daß ein so feiner, vornehmer Herr wegen eines lumpigen Koffers zum Verbrecher werden wollte, aber als ich ihm das sagte, lächelte er nur merkwürdig und antwortete, das verstände ich eben nicht.« -

»Was für Gegenstände vermutet denn der Doktor in dem Koffer?« -

»Ja, das weiß ich nicht. – Darüber hat er sich nie ausgesprochen. Auf alle Fälle ist es aber etwas ganz besonderes, sonst würde er wohl nicht solche Anstrengungen machen, in den Besitz des Gepäckstückes zu gelangen ...«

Erwin überlegte. Einen Augenblick hatte er den Gedanken, zu Dr. Renee zu fahren und ihn um Aufklärung zu bitten. Aber das ging nicht. Dr. Renee würde nie daran glauben, daß Erwin selbst nichts Genaues über den Inhalt des Koffers wisse. Er würde vielmehr hinter einem solchen Besuch eine Falle wittern und noch mißtrauischer werden. Man mußte also vorläufig den Dingen ihren Lauf lassen, sorgfältig aber alles, was Dr. Renee unternahm, im Auge behalten. Dazu war Juffo allem Anschein nach die geeignete Persönlichkeit.

Erwin steckte den Revolver ein, entnahm seiner Brieftasche eine Fünfzigfrankennote und schob das Geld dem Italiener hin.

»Hier,« sagte er dabei leise, »hier diese Kleinigkeit für den Anfang. Ich hoffe, es genügt. Sie werden diese Summe allwöchentlich von mir erhalten, aber Sie haben dafür die Pflicht, mich ständig auf das Genaueste darüber zu orientieren, was der Doktor unternimmt. Sie verstehen, auf das Genaueste! Ich will keinen persönlichen und unliebsamen Überraschungen ausgesetzt sein. Der Doktor darf natürlich von all dem nichts merken, sonst ist die ganze Übung zwecklos.«

Juffo griff gierig nach dem Schein, betrachtete ihn einen Augenblick mißtrauisch und stopfte ihn dann mit einer Bewegung, als fürchtete er, der Schatz könne ihm wieder entrissen werden, in eine seiner geräumigen Hosentaschen. Er war noch blässer geworden als gewöhnlich, aber seine Augen sahen bewundernd und dankbar zu Erwin auf.

»Es soll alles geschehen, wie es der Herr befehlen ...!« flüsterte er unterwürfig.

»Gut, gut. Ich möchte Ihnen auch nicht zu dem Gegenteil raten. Ein Wink von mir an den Präfekten, und Sie sitzen samt ihrem Doktor hinter Schloß und Riegel!«

Der Mann zuckte zusammen und hob abwehrend die Hände. Diese Aussicht erschien ihm auf keinen Fall verlockend. Erwin konnte sicher sein, daß er seine Obliegenheiten pünktlich erfüllen werde.

Damit war diese Aussprache beendet. Erwin öffnete die Tür zu den Räumen des Cafés, und Juffo schlüpfte unter tiefen Verbeugungen mit katzenartiger Gewandtheit an ihm vorüber und verschwand im Gewühl des Lokals. Pierre trat hinter dem Schanktisch hervor und kam dem seltenen Gast entgegen.

»Nun, mein Kellner ... alles nach Wunsch?«

Erwin nickte.

»Ich bin zufrieden. Aber behalte den Kerl im Auge und berichte mir gelegentlich, in was für einer Gesellschaft er sich bewegt. Ich habe ihn in meine Dienste genommen.«

Er ließ einige Goldstücke in Pierres erwartungsvoll geöffnete Tatze gleiten. Der steckte die Münzen schmunzelnd fort und stieß dann einen leisen Pfiff aus, den er einige Male wiederholte.

Im nächsten Augenblick fühlte sich Erwin leicht an der Schulter berührt. Er wandte sich um und stand einem großen, schlanken Mädchen gegenüber, dessen alabasterweißes Gesicht von einer roten Haarwelle umlodert wurde.

»Jeannette ...!« stieß er erstaunt hervor, »Jeannette ...! du bist auch noch hier ...?« -

»Wo sollte ich sonst sein ...?« lächelte sie. »hier ... hier ist doch wenigstens etwas Leben, weißt du, Aufregungen, Gefahren ... wie ich es liebe. Pierre sagt zwar, ich solle heiraten, aber pah ... Die Männer, die sich heiraten lassen ...!« -

»Sind nicht nach deinem Geschmack, Jeannette ... nicht wahr? Ich weiß es. – Übrigens auch ich habe geheiratet.« -

»Du?«, sie sah ihn verwundert an. »Ist sie wenigstens hübsch, deine Frau ...?« -

»Es geht.« – Er lachte. »Oder meinst du, daß ich eine häßliche Frau genommen hätte? Dazu hattest du mich doch zu sehr verwöhnt!«

Sie wurde rot vor Freude.

»Komm,« sagte sie und ergriff seine Hand. »Dort in der Ecke ist eine freie Nische. Du hast doch eine halbe Stunde für mich Zeit?«

Ohne seine Antwort abzuwarten, zog sie ihn mit sich fort. Pierre schaute ihnen nach, kratzte sich zufrieden grinsend hinter den Ohren und begab sich dann watschelnd in den Keller, um aus demselben eine der wenigen guten Flaschen hervorzusuchen, die er dem Pärchen vorzusetzen beabsichtigte.

Einen Augenblick widerstrebte es Erwin, dem Mädchen an den Tisch zu folgen. Er legte keinen Wert mehr auf das Leben der Kaschemmen, das ihm früher in seiner bunten Abenteuerlichkeit reizvoll und anziehend erschienen war. Dann aber durchzuckte ihn urplötzlich ein Gedanke! Wie, wenn er Jeannette zu seiner Vertrauten machte und sie bat, das Geheimnis des schwatzen Koffers zu ergründen. Ihr als Weib mußte das leichter gelingen, denn sie konnte sich unter Umständen an Afru heranschlängeln, ohne daß er die Absicht hatte. Außerdem war wohl kaum eine Person so dazu geeignet, den dunklen Wegen des Inders nachzuspüren, als gerade Jeannette, deren ganzes Leben in einer Umgebung verstrichen war, wo die Ausführung und dar Verheimlichen von Verbrechen zur Alltäglichkeit gehörten.

Pierre brachte eine bestaubte Flasche und stellte sie auf die unsaubere Platte des Tisches. Dazu zwei plumpe Aluminiumbecher. Gläser waren in diesem Lokal aus naheliegenden Gründen verpönt.

»Trinkt, meine Kinderchen, ...«, grunzte der alte Gauner verschlagen. »Das ist ein Tropfen, wie er selbst im Maison dorée selten sein dürfte.«

Er schlürfte davon. Jeannette goß die Becher voll. Eine Weile tranken sie schweigend, während Erwin das seltsame Treiben der ihn umgebenden Menschen beobachtete. Es waren zu zwei Drittel Verbrecher und Hehler, deren starkknochige Gesichter von den tiefen Furchen übertriebener Genüsse zerrissen wurden, hie und da bemerkte man auch ein paar Fremde. Meist Maler oder Schriftsteller, die ihre Studien machten. In einer Ecke neben dem Ausgang saßen zwei Kriminalbeamte und tranken, von allen erkannt, mit scheinbarer Gleichgültigkeit billigen Porter.

»Welch seltsames Volk!« dachte Erwin und es erschien ihm merkwürdig, daß er vor absehbarer Zeit hier allabendlicher Gast gewesen und von dieser Sippe als ihresgleichen betrachtet worden war.

Er wandte seine Aufmerksamkeit wieder der Frau zu, die ihm lässig gegenüberlehnte und ihn aus schwarzumrandeten Augen erwartungsvoll ansah. Sie hatte einen eigenartigen Reiz und Erwin konnte es sich wohl vorstellen, daß ihr geschmeidiges, katzenartiges Wesen unter Beihilfe entsprechender Toiletten seine Wirkung auch auf verwöhnte Männer nicht verfehlen werde. Augenblicklich war sie allerdings nur mit einem abgetragenen, giftgrünen Pullover und einem kurzen Tuchröckchen bekleidet, während ihre sehr schönen Beine in hohen Schnürstiefeln steckten. Sie hielt eine Zigarette schief im Munde und stieß zuweilen leise zischend den Rauch zwischen den scharlachrot geschminkten Lippen hervor.

Erwin beugte sich ein wenig nach vorne und sagte halblaut:

»Jeannette, wie ist es ...? Bist du irgendwie gebunden ...?«

Sie sah ihn erstaunt an, scheinbar hatte sie diese Frage nicht erwartet, und erwiderte dann zögernd:

»Ich weiß nicht, wie du das meinst ...?« -

»Ich meine, ob du jederzeit dazu bereit wärst, nicht nur diese Menschen hier, sondern auch Marseille zu verlassen, oder ob du dich irgendwie gebunden fühlst.«

Jeannette antwortete nicht gleich, sondern nahm erst einen tiefen Zug aus ihrer fast ausgebrannten Zigarette, stieß den Rauch mit geschlossenen Augen durch die Nase wieder aus und zerdrückte dann umständlich den Stummel auf einem Blechteller. Jedenfalls überlegte sie das Für und Wider.

»Ich bin natürlich gebunden ...,« sagte sie endlich geringschätzig, »aber es besteht kein nennenswertes Hindernis, diese Bande gegebenenfalls zu lösen ...« -

»Genügt es, wenn ich dir ein Honorar von zehntausend Franken monatlich aussetze und dich dafür bitte, deine Wohnung vorläufig nach Paris zu verlegen?«

Erwin hatte nicht erwartet, daß diese Worte eine solche Wirkung ausüben würden. – Jeannette sprang mit einem schrillen Freudenschrei auf, drehte sich mehrere Male wie irrsinnig um sich selbst und fiel dann Erwin um den Hals, sein Gesicht mit stürmischen Küssen bedeckend. Er konnte sie nur mit Mühe beruhigen und auf ihren Platz zurückdrängen.

»Du hast noch nicht gehört, was ich für diese Summe verlange«, sagte er, um ihren Enthusiasmus zu dämpfen.

Jeannette lachte hysterisch.

»Was du verlangst? – Verlang was du willst! Zehntausend Franken bleiben zehntausend Franken ... und dazu noch in Paris! – Aber du hast recht, ich benehme mich wie ein Backfisch ... du mußt schon entschuldigen ... die Größe der Summe hat mir ein wenig den Verstand genommen ...!«

Sie goß einen Becher des schweren Weines herunter, als sei es Wasser und wurde dann etwas ruhiger.

»Erzähle weiter!« bat sie.

Und Erwin erzählte. Alles. Auch das seltsame Interesse des Dr. Renee, dessen Gemahlin vor einigen Monaten in Paris verschwunden war, verhehlte er nicht. Sie, Jeannette, die gerissenste aller Marseiller Grisetten, sei nun berufen, sich das Vertrauen des Inders zu erschleichen und den dunklen Schleier zu lüften, den dieser Mann um seine Handlungen wob.

»Ich will dir nicht zureden, den Auftrag zu übernehmen,« schloß Erwin seine Ausführungen, »denn es besteht Grund zu der Annahme, daß du dich in Gefahren begibst. Überleg' dir daher die Angelegenheit bis ...«

Aber Jeannette ließ ihn nicht aussprechen.

»Überlegen ...? – Es scheint, du hast vergessen, daß ich die »Rote Jeannette« bin. Es gibt nichts zu überlegen. Ohne Gefahr hätte die ganze Geschichte für mich keinen Reiz. Und wenn es dir recht ist, fahre ich morgen nach Paris!«