de-en  Siegfried Bergengruen: Die Puppen des Maharadscha - 6. Kapitel
Chapter 6 - Sanjo Afru entered.

No one could understand how he had got inside the house. Apparently, they had forgotten to close the corridor doors and the garden gate when the blue limousine drove off, although the domestics and the manservant claimed the opposite.

In any case, he was there!

Ivonne was busy with the last arrangements at the tea table and Erwin was buried in thought smoking a cigar.

He was standing there in the room.

With his arms crossed, he was wearing a long Indian robe and a white turban over his dark brown face. He bowed deeply and without a word.

Erwin jumped to his feet and rushed towards him. Now that he was there, he had to be met with the greatest possible kindness.

"Welcome, Sanjo Afru!" he shouted, "Welcome! - Long time no see. - Here, this is my wife, whose property I owe in part to your noblesse as well!" Afru deflected. But at least a smile passed over his stony features when Ivonne gave him her hand.

"I see! So, he is not entirely unaffected by women, Erwin thought, and this perception reassured him a little, as it was the first time he had noticed an expression on the Indian's face, which brought him closer to the Indian in a purely human way.

"I hope I won't disturb you and your young wife too much with my late visit," Afru said and turned to Erwin again. "I could have come tomorrow during the day, but we Indians are just old-fashioned people. - We have princes and feel obliged to follow their orders punctually...!" Ivonne laughed.

This man wasn't as bad as she first thought he was. On the contrary, the longer you looked at him, the more the great beauty of his appearance began to become apparent, behind the features of his strange face slumbered abysses of mysterious ideas and magical powers.

"You' re not bothering us at all." she said. "Really not! We are even used to receiving visitors in the evenings, as Erwin is prevented from doing business during the day. - So let's have a seat! The tea will come soon!" And now the miraculous thing happened that Sanjo Afru began to change slowly but steadily. The rigidity fell from his being like a heavy, oppressive cloak and revealed a man who availed such enchanting social abilities from within that Erwin and Ivonne had to look at each other in astonishment. He literally transfixed them. His stories were so vibrant and exciting that they completely forgot how bad the French was that this stranger used to express himself.

They moved into the salon.

The servant brought champagne, the sent of cigarettes wafted through the room.

Sanjo Afru reached into the wide sash around his hips and pulled out a small box, the sides of which were covered with strange figures and arabesques of stamped silver.

"In this small container is the holy ring of Rithnar, which will be yours!" he said solemnly.

"You wrote me that it had a rare significance," Erwin replied. "Wouldn't you like to tell us what it's about!" Afru nodded.

"Of course I want to. And I am actually here for this reason alone, otherwise I would have simply handed over my master's gift to you and would have gone on my way again without bothering you for so long. - But no one may wear the holy ring of Rithnar without knowing his story." He remained silent and leaned back deeply into his armchair. It was obvious that his thoughts were only wandering away somewhere, somewhere into another, distant world, from which no one in this country was capable of getting a notion, but which had to remain unforgettable for those who had once known them.

Eventually he began: "What I am about to tell you happened a few centuries ago. At that time the ancient Raja palace of Sukentala was ruled by a young prince, fond of life, known as Rithnar.

Day and night, the halls echoed with the soft sounds of flutes and stringed instruments, to which graceful dances and round dance performances were performed. Feast followed feast. Flocks of distinguished noblemen with their favorites arrived from the neighboring farms, often staying for weeks and returning to their countries laden with gifts. Far beyond the borders of Sukentala, the rumor spread of the splendor and riches that unfolded at Rithnar's court.

One day Rithnar desired to join a tiger hustle and bustle. Upon a huge white elephant carrying a gilded, covered throne on its back, he rode into the jungle at the head of a great retinue to meet the most dangerous of predators.

Meanwhile, the day passed by and the twilight began to descend without the drivers having chased up a tiger from his lair despite the noise and screams that they carried out.

The prince became discontented and ordered the hunt to be interrupted. He wanted to venture alone into the darkness of the bamboo forest on foot, in order to find and hunt down one of the beasts of prey.

The begged and beseeched him to abandon this plan. Even during the day it was considered dangerous to go into the thicket, as it was swarming with snakes and the ground was often so swampy that one could sink into it without a trace. At night, however, such a daring endeavor would certainly be suicidal.

But the prince could not be dissuaded from his idea. Only his valet Ala, who prostrated himself before him and begged him with hot tears to take him with him, at least for company, was finally allowed to do so.

So the two men, after they had equipped themselves with weapons and several torches, disappeared in the impenetrable darkness of the Indian night, leaving the entourage in worry and fear around a great fire that had been lit in the meantime to protect them from wild animals.

For a while the march of Rithnar and Ala proceeded without any remarkable obstacles. They had found an old elephant path and were able to easily move along it with the light of the torch. The only creatures they saw were large swamp birds, which sometimes rose from the tangle of plants all around and disappeared into darkness screeching loudly with flapping wings.

But then the elephant path came to an end. Reeds and bogflowers grew luxuriantly between the ever denser bamboo perennials and with their smooth loops ensnared the feet of the men. Furthermore, the ground became softer step by step.

By all appearances, there was water nearby.

Without paying attention, Rithnar went further and further, such that Ala had trouble following him since at times he cut signs into the bamboo trunks with his knife in order to find his way back afterwards.

And suddenly - as if under a magic wand - the forest separated, and in front of them the surface of a small lake shone in the glow of the moon that had risen in the meantime, in whose mirror-like surface the flames of the torches flickered and sparkled.

"Where are we?" asked Rithnar.

"I don't know exactly, sir," Ala replied, "but I think it's the Tujam pond where the hermit Adranat built his dwelling." "It is said that he has a daughter ...?" "Yes, my Lord! And one says she is very beautiful!" For a moment the prince deliberated, then he quickly gave the order: "Put out the torches! We want to search the banks!" It happened according to his wishes. Ala extinguished the torches and they set out to explore the jungle around them.

Meanwhile it became brighter and brighter, the sun rose and evaporated the fog - there was no sign of a human dwelling. It was really as if there was an unlucky star above this undertaking of Rithnar and as if some kindly minded spirit power wanted him to turn back in good time. But who escapes his destiny!

The prince, disconcerted by the failures of the night, but tired at the same time from the exertions of the march, finally covered himself with his coat and went to sleep. He instructed Ala, however, to watch and keep an eye on the shores, but to wake him up immediately in case he noticed a living creature.

But Ala, too, was sleepy beyond all measure. For a while he fought valiantly against fatigue, but then his head sank to his chest and he slumbered.

Rithnar awoke late in the afternoon to the sounds of soft music. Astonished, he straightened himself up and saw, not far from the place where he and his servant had lain down, a young girl sitting on a big stone and playing the flute. As she became aware that he was moving, she put down her instrument and looked at him with questioning eyes.

He arose and went towards her. Undaunted, she let him approach her and returned his polite greeting with a friendly nod of the head.

They soon entered into conversation, during the course of which she proved indeed to be the recluse Adranat's daughter, whose miraculous beauty was talked about from Sukentala to as far as Nepal. - And truly, the rumors were not false, on the contrary, she was much more charming and lovely than it could ever have been described in human words.

And here the disaster started, which broke in over Rithnar. In a few days, he fell in love with the daughter of the hermit Adranat, and fell so in love that he proposed that she become his favorite.

She laughed at him.

She, that simple girl, who had seen nothing but jungle and water throughout her life, and except for her father only occasionally dealt with lost hunters and fishermen was to become Princess of Sukentala. No, that was impossible! - Besides, the father would never permit it ... never ... and then ... Yes, that's the way it was! Rithnar figured it out too late, but even if he had learnt about it earlier, it wouldn't have been an obstacle for him. - She loved another man. A young fisherman, Kadmyr by name, who had a shanty in Gandak and lived off selling his catch at low prices down in the town.

Kadmyr was only, as they say, a poor fisherman, but otherwise a man who had to draw the eyes of every woman to himself and enchant her, and who could probably compete with the prince in this respect.

When Rithnar's eager solicitations were unsuccessful and even his most enticing promises went unheeded, he ordered his servants to kidnap the girl and drag her to Raja Palace.

This bridal abduction drew the first blood.

Adranat confronted the envoys of Rithnar with the weapon in his hand and was slain.

Moja, the daughter of the hermit, stayed in Rithnar's women's palace for a whole year without answering his requests. Motionless, she sat in one corner of her beautifully furnished bed chamber, staring at the floor with her head inclined. She remained in this position even when Rithnar happened to visit her several times a day, neither did she answer his questions nor did she acknowledge the precious gifts he brought her with a look.

She thought of Kadmyr, whom she loved and mourned Adranat, who had been slain by the servants of the prince.

Only in the evening after the sun had set did she sometimes sneak out onto a small balcony, sit on the balustrade of the wall and elicit mournful tunes from her bamboo flute. Then it must have happened that from the high reeds of the Gandak flowing by at some distance away, the dull, eerie call of a swamp owl sounded several times, and there were people there who rumored that it had been Kadmyr having strange conversations with his captive lover.

Meanwhile, Rithnar's patience was running out. When Moja had lived in the women's palace for a year without allowing him the slightest tenderness, without further ado he ordered the wedding feast to be prepared, which was to take place within a week.

The female slaves who had been ordered to serve Moja told her that during these recent days that the girl, contrary to her former habit, had wandered restlessly in the chambers and often looked down from the balcony to the Gandak.

And then in the night before the wedding the unthinkable had happened, that Moja fled. No one could understand how this had happened, for the bars and gates had been closed, and the yard was teeming with guards.

Rithnar was seething with anger, disappointment and jealousy. He headed out himself with numerous warriors to search for Moja. The whole jungle was swept and they were finally found, as one should have presumed, in Kadmyr's cabin.

But it was too late. A stab with the dagger under her left breast, which had penetrated deep into the heart, had killed her. Kadmyr himself lay stretched out on the floor, and as one of the prince's servants approached him, a wrathful cobra raised its head and hissed at him.

Throughout the day and the following night Rithnar sat silently and without moving a muscle at the deadbed of his beloved. Then, when the sun rose, he had her laid in a golden sedan chair carried to Sukentala and lay out in one of his most beautiful halls.

Nobody was allowed to enter this room, only the famous magician Imal was called for there.

When Imal entered, Rithnar led him to Mojah's body, knocked back the silk cloth covering the cold body, and pointed to a large drop of blood that had swollen out of the heart wound and clotted over it.

"I'll give you as much gold as you can carry," he said, "if you can turn that drop of blood into a stone to carry on your finger in a ring." Imal bowed deeply, asked for three weeks time, solved the drop of blood from the wound with great care and went home. There he manufactured the ring of the Rithnar, which he brought to the prince on the appointed date.

Rithnar himself wore this ring only for a short time, for he died soon afterwards in a cottage on Lake Tujam, where he spent the last part of his life in great seclusion. But his successors inherited and allocated it to individuals who had rendered them some special service. And now comes the strangest part: the ring kept returning to the Maharajas of Sukentala. Every time its respective owner was in great danger and saved from it, the ring disappeared from his sight, as if it had done its duty, and returned to the Raja Palace. Let us hope that if something evil should ever befall you, it will protect you and save you." Sanjo Afru got up. He had spoken his last words particularly meaningfully and with greater emphasis. He seized the box, opened it and took out the ring resting in a green silk cushion. Slowly he went towards Erwin and put the juwel on his finger

"Take good care of it!" he said solemnly. "Take good care of it! In it dwelled a supernatural power, the power of everlasting blood. Who knows when you need it!" Ivonne rushed over to look at the ring. It was worked most strangely and portrayed the intertwining bodies of three snakes, which encircled a large, red sparkling drop with their heads and tails.

"Really, as if it were coagulated heart blood," Ivonne said, and a horror ran down her back at the thought.

"Heartblood, but that should protect!" replied Erwin seriously. He too felt strange, although he basically did not believe in such things.

He looked up to thank Afru, but then he and Ivonne noticed to their amazement that the Indian had already gone silently.

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-puppen-des-maharadscha-9072/7
unit 1
Kapitel 6 - Sanjo Afru trat ein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 2
Keiner konnte begreifen, wie er in das Haus gekommen war.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 4
Jedenfalls, er war da!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 6
Da stand er im Zimmer.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 8
Er verneigte sich tief und ohne ein Wort zu sagen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 9
Erwin sprang aus und eilte ihm entgegen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 11
»Willkommen, Sanjo Afru!« rief er, »Willkommen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 12
– Wir haben uns lange nicht gesehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 14
unit 15
»Aha!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 20
Dieser Mann war nicht so schlimm, wie sie zuerst angenommen hatte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 22
»Sie stören uns gar nicht!« sagte sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 23
»Wirklich nicht!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 25
– Also setzen wir uns!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 28
Er schlug sie förmlich in Bann.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 30
Man siedelte in den Salon über.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 31
Der Diener brachte Champagner, Zigarettenduft wiegte sich durch den Raum.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 34
»Sie schrieben mir, er habe eine seltsame Bewandtnis,« antwortete Erwin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 35
»Wollen Sie uns nun nicht erzählen, worum es sich dabei handelt!« Afru nickte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 36
»Gewiß, das will ich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 43
Fest reihte sich an Fest.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 46
Eines Tages begehrte Rithnar, ein Tigertreiben mitzumachen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 49
Der Fürst wurde mißmutig und befahl, die Jagd zu unterbrechen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 51
Man bat, man beschwor ihn, von diesem Vorhaben abzustehen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 53
Nachts aber glich ein so waghalsiges Unterfangen dem sicheren Selbstmord.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 54
Aber der Fürst war von seiner Idee nicht abzubringen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 57
unit 60
Dann aber hatte der Elefantenpfad ein Ende.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 62
Außerdem wurde der Boden von Schritt zu Schritt weicher.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 63
Allem Anschein nach befand sich in der Nähe ein Gewässer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 66
»Wo sind wir?« fragte Rithnar.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 69
Wir wollen die Ufer durchsuchen!« Es geschah nach seinem Wunsch.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 73
Aber wer entgeht seinem Schicksal!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 76
Aber auch Ala war über alle Maßen schläfrig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 78
Rithnar erwachte spät am Nachmittag unter den Klängen einer leisen Musik.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 81
Er erhob sich und ging auf sie zu.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 85
Und hier beginnt nun das Verhängnis, das über Rithnar hereinbrach.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 87
Sie lachte ihn aus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 89
Nein, das war unmöglich!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 92
– Sie liebte einen anderen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 96
Bei diesem Brautraub floß das erste Blut.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 104
Indessen ging Rithnars Geduld auf die Neige.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 107
Und in der Nacht vor der Hochzeit da geschah das Unfaßbare, daß Moja entfloh.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 109
Rithnar schäumte vor Wut, Enttäuschung und Eifersucht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 110
Er selbst brach mit zahlreichen Kriegern auf, um Moja zu suchen.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 112
Aber es war zu spät.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 117
unit 126
unit 128
Langsam ging er auf Erwin zu und steckte ihm das Kleinod an den Finger.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 129
»Hüten Sie ihn!« sagte er feierlich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 130
»Hüten Sie ihn!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 131
In ihm wohnt eine übersinnliche Kraft, die Kraft des unvergänglichen Blutes.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 132
Wer weiß, wann sie ihn brauchen!« Ivonne eilte hinzu, um den Ring zu betrachten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 135
»Herzblut, das aber schützen soll!« antwortete Erwin ernst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 136
unit 138
http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-puppen-des-maharadscha-9072/7
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 1  2 months, 1 week ago

Kapitel 6 -

Sanjo Afru trat ein.

Keiner konnte begreifen, wie er in das Haus gekommen war. Allem Anschein nach hatte man die Flurtüren und das Gartentor zu schließen vergessen, als die blaue Limousine fortfuhr, obgleich die Dienerschaft und der Hausknecht das Gegenteil behaupteten.

Jedenfalls, er war da!

Ivonne beschäftigte sich gerade mit den letzten Anordnungen am Teetisch und Erwin rauchte gedankenversunken eine Zigarre.

Da stand er im Zimmer.

Mit gekreuzten Armen, langem indischem Gewand, einen weißen Turban über dem dunkelbraunen Gesicht. Er verneigte sich tief und ohne ein Wort zu sagen.

Erwin sprang aus und eilte ihm entgegen. Nun, wo er da war, mußte man ihm mit möglichster Liebenswürdigkeit zu begegnen trachten.

»Willkommen, Sanjo Afru!« rief er, »Willkommen! – Wir haben uns lange nicht gesehen. – Hier, das ist meine Frau, deren Besitz ich zum Teil auch Ihrer Noblesse verdanke!«

Afru wehrte ab. Immerhin aber überflog ein Lächeln seine steinernen Züge, als ihm Ivonne die Hand gab.

»Aha! Also Weibern gegenüber ist er doch nicht ganz ungerührt!« dachte Erwin, und diese Wahrnehmung beruhigte ihn ein wenig, als habe er dadurch zum erstenmal an dem Inder einen Zug bemerkt, durch den er ihm rein menschlich näher gebracht wurde.

»Ich hoffe, daß ich Sie und Ihre junge Gattin durch meinen späten Besuch nicht allzusehr störe!« sagte Afru und wandte sich wieder an Erwin. »Ich hätte ja auch morgen am Tage kommen können, aber wir Inder sind eben noch altmodische Menschen. – Wir haben Fürsten und fühlen uns verpflichtet, ihren Befehlen pünktlich nachzukommen ...!«

Ivonne lachte.

Dieser Mann war nicht so schlimm, wie sie zuerst angenommen hatte. Im Gegenteil, je länger man ihn betrachtete, um so mehr begann einem die große Schönheit seiner Erscheinung zum Bewußtsein zu kommen, hinter den Zügen dieses eigenartigen Gesichtes schlummerten Abgründe rätselhafter Ideen und magischer Kräfte.

»Sie stören uns gar nicht!« sagte sie. »Wirklich nicht! Wir sind es sogar gewohnt, meist abends Besuch zu empfangen, denn tags ist Erwin doch geschäftlich verhindert. – Also setzen wir uns! Der Tee wird gleich kommen!«

Und nun geschah das Wunderbare, daß Sanjo Afru sich langsam aber stetig zu wandeln begann. Die Starrheit sank wie ein schwerer, lastender Mantel von seinem Wesen und gab einen Menschen frei, der so bezaubernde gesellschaftliche Fähigkeiten aus seinem Innern zutage förderte, daß sich Erwin und Ivonne ein über das anderemal erstaunt ansehen mußten. Er schlug sie förmlich in Bann. Seine Erzählungen waren so sprühend und spannend, daß sie es vollkommen vergaßen, wie schlecht das Französisch war, in dem sich dieser Fremde auszudrücken pflegte.

Man siedelte in den Salon über.

Der Diener brachte Champagner, Zigarettenduft wiegte sich durch den Raum.

Sanjo Afru griff in die breite Schärpe, die seine Hüften umschloß und zog daraus ein kleines Kästchen hervor, dessen Seiten mit seltsamen Figuren und Arabesken aus gestanztem Silber bedeckt waren.

»In diesem kleinen Behältnis befindet sich der heilige Ring des Rithnar, der Ihnen gehören wird!« sagte er feierlich.

»Sie schrieben mir, er habe eine seltsame Bewandtnis,« antwortete Erwin. »Wollen Sie uns nun nicht erzählen, worum es sich dabei handelt!«

Afru nickte.

»Gewiß, das will ich. Und aus diesem Grunde bin ich ja eigentlich auch nur hier, sonst hätte ich Ihnen das Geschenk meines Herrn einfach ausgehändigt und wäre dann wieder meine Wege gezogen, ohne Sie so lange zu belästigen. – Aber niemand darf den heiligen Ring des Rithnar tragen, ohne seine Geschichte zu kennen.«

Er schwieg und lehnte sich tief in seinen Sessel zurück. Man sah es ihm an, daß seine Gedanken nur irgendwohin fortwanderten, irgendwohin in eine andere, ferne Welt, von der man sich hierzulande keinen Begriff zu machen vermochte, die aber für den, der sie einmal kennengelernt hatte, unvergeßlich bleiben mußte.

Schließlich begann er:

»Was ich nun erzählen werde, ist vor einigen Jahrhunderten geschehen. Damals herrschte in dem uralten Rajapalast von Sukentala ein junger, lebensfreudiger Fürst, Rithnar mit Namen.

Tag und Nacht hallten die Säle von den weichen Klängen der Flöten und Saiteninstrumente wider, zu denen anmutige Tänze und Reigenspiele aufgeführt wurden. Fest reihte sich an Fest. Scharen vornehmer Edelleute mit ihren Favoritinnen trafen von den Nachbarhöfen ein, blieben oft wochenlang und kehrten mit Geschenken beladen in ihre Länder zurück. Weit über die Grenzen von Sukentala erscholl das Gerücht von dem Prunk und Reichtum, der an Rithnars Hofe entfaltet wurde.

Eines Tages begehrte Rithnar, ein Tigertreiben mitzumachen. Auf einem riesigen, weißen Elefanten, der einen vergoldeten, überdachten Thron auf seinem Rücken trug, ritt er an der Spitze eines großen Gefolges in die Dschungel, um dem gefährlichsten aller Raubtiere zu begegnen.

Indessen verging der Tag und die Dämmerung begann herabzusinken, ohne daß die Treiber trotz des Lärms und Geschreis, das sie vollführten, einen Tiger aus seinem Lager aufgejagt hätten.

Der Fürst wurde mißmutig und befahl, die Jagd zu unterbrechen. Er allein wollte sich zu Fuß in das Dunkel des Bambuswaldes wagen, um eines der Raubtiere zu stellen und zur Strecke zu bringen.

Man bat, man beschwor ihn, von diesem Vorhaben abzustehen. Selbst am Tage galt es als gefährlich, sich in das Dickicht zu begeben, da es dort von Schlangen wimmelte und der Boden nicht selten so sumpfig war, daß man darin spurlos versinken konnte. Nachts aber glich ein so waghalsiges Unterfangen dem sicheren Selbstmord.

Aber der Fürst war von seiner Idee nicht abzubringen. Nur sein Kammerdiener Ala, der sich vor ihm niederwarf und ihn unter heißen Tränen anflehte, ihn wenigstens zu seiner Begleitung mitzunehmen, gestattete er dies schließlich.

So verschwanden denn die beiden Männer, nachdem sie sich mit Waffen und mehreren Fackeln ausgerüstet hatten, in dem undurchdringlichen Dunkel der indischen Nacht, das Gefolge in Sorge und Angst um ein großes Feuer, das zum Schutze vor wilden Tieren mittlerweile angezündet worden war, zurücklassend.

Eine Weile ging der Marsch Rithnars und Alas ohne bemerkenswerte Hindernisse vor sich. Sie hatten einen alten Elefantenpfad gefunden und vermochten beim Scheine der Fackel einigermaßen bequem darauf vorwärts zu kommen. Die einzigen Lebewesen, die sie zu Gesicht bekamen, waren große Sumpfvögel, die sich zuweilen ringsum aus dem Pflanzengewirr erhoben und laut kreischend mit klatschenden Flügelschlägen im Dunkel verschwanden.

Dann aber hatte der Elefantenpfad ein Ende. Schilf und Moorblumen wucherten üppig zwischen den immer dichter werdenden Bambusstauden und umgarnten mit ihren glatten Schlingen die Füße der Männer. Außerdem wurde der Boden von Schritt zu Schritt weicher.

Allem Anschein nach befand sich in der Nähe ein Gewässer.

Ohne darauf zu achten, strebte Rithnar weiter und weiter, so daß Ala Mühe hatte, ihm zu folgen, da er zuweilen mit seinem Messer Zeichen in die Bambusstämme hieb, um nachher den Weg zurückzufinden.

Und plötzlich – wie unter einem Zauberschlag – trat der Wald auseinander, und vor ihnen erglänzte im Scheine des mittlerweile aufgegangenen Mondes die Fläche eines kleinen Sees, in dessen Spiegel die Flammen der Fackeln flimmerten und sprühten.

»Wo sind wir?« fragte Rithnar.

»Ich weiß es nicht genau, Herr,« erwiderte Ala, »aber ich glaube, es ist der Teich Tujam, an dem der Einsiedler Adranat seine Wohnstätte erbaute.«

»Man spricht davon, er habe eine Tochter ...?«

»Ja, Herr! Und man sagt, sie sei sehr schön!«

Einen Augenblick überlegte der Fürst, dann befahl er kurz:

»Lösche die Fackeln! Wir wollen die Ufer durchsuchen!«

Es geschah nach seinem Wunsch. Ala drückte die Fackeln aus und sie machten sich daran, den Urwald ringsumher zu erforschen.

Indessen wurde es heller und heller, die Sonne stieg auf und zerstrahlte die Nebel – von einer menschlichen Wohnstätte war nichts zu finden. Es war wirklich so, als stände ein Unstern über diesem Unternehmen Rithnars und als wollte ihn irgendeine freundlich gesinnte Geistermacht veranlassen, beizeiten umzukehren. Aber wer entgeht seinem Schicksal!

Der Fürst, verdrossen durch die Mißerfolge der Nacht, gleichzeitig aber auch ermüdet von den Strapazen des Marsches, deckte schließlich seinen Mantel aus und legte sich schlafen. Ala dagegen wies er an, zu wachen und die Ufer im Auge zu behalten, ihn aber für den Fall, daß er ein Lebewesen bemerkte, sofort zu wecken.

Aber auch Ala war über alle Maßen schläfrig. Eine Weile kämpfte er tapfer gegen die Müdigkeit an, dann aber sank auch ihm der Kopf auf die Brust, und er schlummerte ein.

Rithnar erwachte spät am Nachmittag unter den Klängen einer leisen Musik. Erstaunt richtete er sich auf und erblickte nicht weit von der Stelle, wo er und sein Diener sich gelagert hatten, ein junges Mädchen, das auf einem großen Steine saß und Flöte blies. Als sie gewahr wurde, daß er sich bewegte, ließ sie ihr Instrument sinken und sah ihn mit fragenden Augen an.

Er erhob sich und ging auf sie zu. Ohne Furcht ließ sie ihn herankommen und erwiderte seinen höflichen Gruß mit einem freundlichen Kopfnicken.

Sie kamen bald in ein Gespräch, in dessen Verlauf es sich erwies, daß sie wirklich die Tochter des Einsiedlers Adranat war, von deren Schönheit sich die Leute von Sukentala bis nach Nepal hinein Wunderdinge erzählten. – Und wahrhaftig, die Gerüchte hatten nicht gelogen, im Gegenteil, sie war noch viel reizvoller und lieblicher, als das jemals hätte durch menschliche Worte beschrieben werden können.

Und hier beginnt nun das Verhängnis, das über Rithnar hereinbrach. Er verliebte sich in wenigen Tagen unrettbar in die Tochter des Einsiedlers Adranat, verliebte sich so, daß er ihr vorschlug, seine Favoritin zu werden.

Sie lachte ihn aus.

Sie, das einfache Mädchen, das Zeit seines Lebens nichts als Dschungel und Wasser gesehen hatte, und außer mit dem Vater nur zuweilen mit verirrten Jägern und Fischern umging, sollte Fürstin von Sukentala werden. Nein, das war unmöglich! – Außerdem würde es der Vater nie erlauben ... nie ... und dann ...

Ja, das war es eben! Rithnar kam erst zu spät dahinter, aber auch wenn er es früher erfahren hätte, wäre das kein Hinderungsgrund für ihn gewesen. – Sie liebte einen anderen. Einen jungen Fischer, Kadmyr mit Namen, der eine armselige Hütte am Gandak hatte und davon lebte, daß er seine Beute unten in der Stadt zu niedrigen Preisen feilbot.

Kadmyr war zwar nur, wie gesagt, ein armer Fischer, dafür aber sonst ein Mann, der eines jeden Weibes Blicke auf sich lenken und entzücken mußte und in dieser Beziehung wohl mit dem Fürsten wettstreiten konnte.

Als Rithnars eifrige Bewerbungen ohne Erfolg und selbst seine verlockendsten Versprechungen unbeachtet blieben, befahl er seinen Dienern, das Mädchen zu rauben und es in den Rajapalast zu schleppen.

Bei diesem Brautraub floß das erste Blut.

Adranat stellte sich den Abgesandten Rithnars mit der Waffe in der Hand entgegen und wurde erschlagen.

Ein ganzes Jahr blieb nun Moja, die Einsiedlerstochter, in dem Frauenpalast Rithnars, ohne seine Bitten zu erhören. Regungslos saß sie in einer Ecke ihres wunderbar ausgestatteten Schlafgemachs und starrte mit geneigtem Haupt vor sich auf den Boden. In dieser Stellung blieb sie auch, wenn Rithnar, was mehrere Male am Tage geschah, sie besuchte, weder antwortete sie auf seine Fragen noch würdigte sie die kostbaren Geschenke, die er ihr brachte, eines Blickes.

Sie dachte an Kadmyr, den sie liebte, und trauerte um Adranat, den die Diener des Fürsten erschlagen hatten.

Nur abends, wenn die Sonne untergegangen war, schlich sie zuweilen auf einen kleinen Balkon hinaus, setzte sich auf die Brüstung der Mauer und entlockte ihrer Bambusflöte schwermütige Weisen. Dann geschah es wohl, daß aus dem hohen Schilf des in einiger Entfernung vorüberfließenden Gandak mehrmals der dumpfe, unheimliche Ruf einer Sumpfeule ertönte, und es gab Leute, die da munkelten, das sei Kadmyr gewesen, der mit seiner gefangenen Geliebten seltsame Zwiesprache halte.

Indessen ging Rithnars Geduld auf die Neige. Als Moja ein Jahr im Frauenpalast gewohnt hatte, ohne ihm die geringsten Zärtlichkeiten zu erlauben, befahl er kurzerhand, das Hochzeitsfest zu rüsten, das binnen einer Woche stattfinden sollte.

Die Sklavinnen, die zur Bedienung Mojas bestellt waren, erzählten, daß das Mädchen während dieser letzten Tage entgegen ihrer früheren Gewohnheit unruhig in den Gemächern umhergeirrt und oft vom Balkon aus nach dem Gandak hinabgeschaut haben soll.

Und in der Nacht vor der Hochzeit da geschah das Unfaßbare, daß Moja entfloh. Niemand konnte begreifen, wie das geschehen war, denn die Gitter und Tore waren geschlossen gewesen und der Hof wimmelte von Wächtern.

Rithnar schäumte vor Wut, Enttäuschung und Eifersucht. Er selbst brach mit zahlreichen Kriegern auf, um Moja zu suchen. Der ganze Dschungel wurde durchsucht und man fand sie auch schließlich, wie man es gleich hätte vermuten sollen, in der Hütte Kadmyrs.

Aber es war zu spät. Ein Dolchstich unter der linken Brust, der bis tief in das Herz gedrungen war, hatte sie getötet. Kadmyr selbst lag hingestreckt auf dem Fußboden, und als einer der Fürstendiener sich ihm näherte, zischte ihm eine zornig aufgereckte Kobra entgegen.

Den ganzen Tag und die folgende Nacht saß Rithnar stumm und ohne sich zu rühren am Totenlager der Geliebten. Dann, als die Sonne aufging, ließ er sie in eine goldene Sänfte legen, nach Sukentala tragen und in einem seiner schönsten Säle aufbahren.

Niemand durfte diesen Raum betreten, nur den berühmten Zauberer Imal entbot er dorthin.

Als Imal eintrat, führte ihn Rithnar an Mojas Leiche, schlug das seidene Tuch, das den kalten Leib bedeckte, zurück und wies auf einen großen Blutstropfen, der aus der Herzenswunde hervorgequollen und darüber erstarrt war.

»Ich gebe dir soviel Gold, als du tragen kannst,« sagte er, »wenn du es fertigbringst, diesen Blutstropfen in einen Stein umzuwandeln, den ich in einem Ring am Finger tragen kann.«

Imal verneigte sich tief, bat um drei Wochen Zeit, löste den Blutstropfen mit großer Vorsicht von der Wunde und begab sich heim. Dort verfertigte er den Ring des Rithnar, den er zum festgesetzten Termin dem Fürsten überbrachte.

Rithnar selbst trug diesen Ring nur kurze Zeit, denn er starb bald darauf in einem Häuschen am See Tujam, wo er in größter Zurückgezogenheit die letzte Zeit seines Lebens verbrachte. Aber seine Nachfolger erbten und vergaben ihn an Persönlichkeiten, die ihnen irgendwelche besondere Dienste geleistet hatten. Und nun kommt das Seltsamste: der Ring kehrte immer wieder zu den Maharadschas von Sukentala zurück. Jedesmal, wenn sein jeweiliger Besitzer in einer großen Gefahr geschwebt und daraus errettet worden war, verschwand der Ring, als habe er nun seine Pflicht getan, aus seinem Gesichtskreis und fand sich wieder im Rajapalast ein. Hoffen wir, daß er auch Sie, wenn einmal etwas Böses über Sie hereinbricht, schützt und errettet.«

Sanjo Afru stand auf. Seine letzten Worte hatte er besonders bedeutungsvoll und mit großer Betonung gesprochen. Er ergriff das Kästchen, öffnete es und entnahm ihm den in einem grünseidenen Polster ruhenden Ring. Langsam ging er auf Erwin zu und steckte ihm das Kleinod an den Finger.

»Hüten Sie ihn!« sagte er feierlich. »Hüten Sie ihn! In ihm wohnt eine übersinnliche Kraft, die Kraft des unvergänglichen Blutes. Wer weiß, wann sie ihn brauchen!«

Ivonne eilte hinzu, um den Ring zu betrachten. Er war höchst eigenartig gearbeitet und stellte die sich verflechtenden Leiber dreier Schlangen dar, die mit ihren Köpfen und Schwänzen einen großen, rotfunkelnden Tropfen umschlossen.

»Wirklich, als ob es geronnenes Herzblut wäre,« sagte Ivonne, und ein Grauen lief ihr bei diesem Gedanken über den Rücken.

»Herzblut, das aber schützen soll!« antwortete Erwin ernst. Auch ihm war seltsam zumute, obgleich er im Grunde genommen an solche Dinge nicht glaubte.

Er schaute auf, um Afru zu danken, da aber bemerkten er und Ivonne zu ihrem Staunen, daß der Inder bereits lautlos gegangen war.

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-puppen-des-maharadscha-9072/7