de-en  Selma_Lagerlöf_Nils Holgersson_und_die_Wildgänse_8
At the Ronneby River.

Neither the wild geese nor the fox Smirre hd ever thought they would meet again after the latter had left Scania.

And so it happened that the wild geese had taken the route over Blekinge and it was to this place that Smirre had also gone.

He had spent the time until now in the northern part of this region and was extremely ill-humoured as a result of his sojourn there.

One afternoon, when Smirre was prowling a desolate forest region not far from the river Ronneby, he saw a flock of wild geese approaching.

He saw right away that one of the geese was white, and then he knew for sure who he was dealing with.

Immediately Smirre began to chase after the geese, on the one hand because he was craving a good meal, however also with the intention of revenging himself for all the vexation they had caused him.

He saw them fly eastward to Ronneby river; there they changed direction and continued to the south.

He guessed that they were looking for a place to sleep on the bank of the river, and hoped he could catch some of them without much ado.

However, when Smirre finally saw the place upon which the geese had alighted to settle for the night, he discovered it to be a very protected spot and that he could not get at them.

The Ronneby river is admittedly not a large or mighty stream, but is indeed renowned for its beautiful river banks.

Time and again it forced itself between steep, mountainous rock walls that rose vertically out of the water and which were completely overgrown with honeysuckle, glossy buckthorn, hawthorn, alder, rowan, ash and willow; on a beautiful summer's day there is easily nothing more pleasant than rowing to this point along the small, dark river and looking up into all the green that clings to the rough cliff faces.

But now, when the wild geese and Smirre came to the river, it was cold, and rough early spring still prevailed, all trees were still bare, and no one even thought about whether the banks were beautiful or ugly.

The wild geese, however, were very happy to see a narrow strip of sand under such a steep mountain face, just big enough to hold the whole flock.

In front of them flowed the river, which was now strong and violent, sharp rise in the snow melting time; behind them they had the rock walls that could not be climbed, and overhanging branches covered them; they couldn't have it better.

Smirre stood high up on the mountain ridge and looked down at the wild geese.

"You might as well give up this pursuit straight away," he said to himself.

"You can't climb down such a steep cliff face, you can't swim through the raging river, and down below at the base of the mountain there is not the slightest sliver of land which would lead to the sleeping place of the wild geese.

These geese are too smart for you, Reineke fox. Don't waste any more time hunting them." However, like other foxes, it was difficult for him to give up a pursuit which he'd already half carried out; therefore he lay down on the very outer edge of the mountain and did not take his eyes off the wild geese.

Whilst he observed them thus, he thought of all the nasty things they had done to him.

Yes, it was their fault that he'd been banned from Scania and forced to flee to Blekinge, where up until now, he had seen no manorial estates, no tame geese and no game preserve full of deer and tasty fawns.

Whilst lying there, he worked himself up into such an angry state that he wished death and destruction on the geese, even if he himself should not get the opportunity to eat them.

As Smirre's anger reached boiling point, he heard a rustling in the huge fir tree close to him and saw a squirrel, which was being relentlessly pursued by a weasel, race down the trunk.

Neither of them noticed Smirre, who remained quite still, observing the chase which went from tree to tree.

He observed the squirrel, that scurried so lightly through the trees as if it could fly.

He also observed the weasel, that was not such an adept climber as the squirrel, but still ran up and down the tree trunks as if it was a flat path through the woods.

"If only I could climb half as well as one of these two," the fox thought, "then they wouldn't be sleeping peacefully for much longer down there." As soon as the hunt was over and the squirrel was caught, Smirre went towards the weasel, but to show that he did not intend to rob him of his prey, stopped two feet distant from him.

He greeted the weasel very pleasantly and congratulated him on the outcome of his hunt.

Smirre choose his words very well, as this is always the case with a fox.

The marten however, who with his long, slim body, his dainty head, his soft fur and his light brown spot at his throat seems like a minor miracle of beauty, is in reality only a cloddish wood dweller, and barely answered the fox.

"Just one thing puzzles me," Smirre continued, "that a hunter such as you would content himself with hunting squirrels when there is so much better game within reach." Then he paused, waiting for a reply, but when the weasel grinned at him impudently without saying a word, he continued: "Is it possible that you haven't seen the wild geese down there in front of the cliff face?

Or, you aren't such a good climber that you are able to get down to them below?" This time Sirre didn't need to wait for an answer.

The weasel rushed up to him with an arched back and ruffled fur.

Have you seen wild geese?" he hissed at him.

"Where are they? Say it quickly, otherwise I'll bite your throat in half." "Now, now, don't forget that I am twice as big as you are and am a little bit polite.

I wish nothing at all more than to point out the wild geese to you." A second later, the weasel was on his way down the slope, and as Sirre watched how he swung his lean, snake-like body from branch to branch, he thought, "This beautiful tree-hunter has the cruelest heart in all of creation.

I believe the wild geese will have me to thank for a gory awakening." However, just as Smirre expected to hear the death cries of the geese, he saw the weasel fall down into the river, causing the water to spray high into the air.

Immediately afterwards the clamour of beating wings could be heard and all of the geese hastily took off.

Smirre wanted to chase quickly after the geese, but he was so curious to find out how they had been rescued, that he remained until the weasel had climbed back up again.

The poor devil was soaking wet and stopped now and then to rub his head with his fore paws.

"I always thought you were a dolt and would fall into the river," Smirre said scornfully.

"I did't act the fool and you have no reason to chide me," the marten answered.

"I was already on one of the lowest branches and considering how I could manage to kill as many of them as possible, when a small creature, no bigger than a squirrel, sprang up and threw a stone at my head with such force that I fell into the water, and before I could crawl out of the water again . . ." The marten did not need to relate any further.

There was nobody listening anymore.

Smirre was already far away chasing after the geese.

Meanwhile Akka had flown southwards to search for a new place to sleep.

There was still some daylight left and the half moon was high in the sky so that she could still see fairly well.

Luckily she knew the area well for it had happened more than once that the geese when flying over the Baltic Sea in spring had ended up in Blekinge.

So she followed the river while she saw it gliding through the moonlit countryside like a blank blinking snake.

In this way, they succeeded in going down to the Deep Fall, where the river disappears into an underground channel and then, clear and translucent as if made of glass, plunges down into a narrow gorge, on the bottom of which it bursts into glittering droplets and splashing foam.

Below the falls, lay several stones, between which the water was foaming in wild eddies, and it was here that Akka alighted.

This was again a good resting place, especially so late in the evening when no people were out and about.

The wild geese could not have safely alighted here at sunset, because the deep fall is in no deserted region.

On one side towers a large cardboard factory, and on the other, which is steep and covered with trees, lies Tiefental Park where people continually roam the slippery and steep paths, wanting to enjoy the raging roar of the wild stream.

Here, it was just as it was at the first place: none of the geese gave even a thought to the fact that they had arrived at a world famous spot.

Later, they of course thought that it was frightening and dangerous to sleep on such smooth, wet stones in the middle of a swirling current which would perhaps well up and sweep them along.

But they had to be satisfied if they were merely safe from predators.

After a while Smirre came running along the riverbank.

He spotted the geese standing out there in the foaming rapids and immediately saw that he couldn't reach them there either.

He felt very humiliated, indeed, it was as if his whole reputation as a hunter was at stake.

While he was mulling it over, he saw an otter with a fish in its mouth coming out of the vortex.

Smirre approached him but kept a two foot distance to show that he did not want to take his kill.

"You are a strange fellow that you are satisfied with fish when the stones out there are indeed full of geese," Smirre said.

He was so agitated that he did not take the time, as it was his usual habit, to choose his words carefully.

The otter did not even turn his head towards the river.

"This is not the first time that we meet, Smirre," he said.

He was a drifter, like all otters, and often had hunted fish at the Vombsjön where he also had met Smirre.

"I know quite well how you manage to grab a salmon trout." Oh, ist that you, Greifan?" Smirre said well pleased for he knew that this otter was a daring and agile swimmer.

"I am not surprised, then, that you don't want to consider the wild geese at all, for you are incapable of coming over to them." But the otter, with webs between his toes, a stiff tail as good as a rudder and fur impenetrable to water, didn't want to be told that there was a vortex of water that he couldn't handle.

He turned towards the river and as soon as he caught sight of the wild geese he dashed over the steep bank into the river.

If spring had been more advanced and the nightingales had arrived in the park of Tiefental already, they would certainly have songs of praise of Geifan's fight with the water vortexes for many a night.

For the otter was often thrown back by the waves and pulled down into the depths but he always worked his way up again and moved towards the big stones.

He swam to the calm water behind the stones and thus came closer and closer to the geese.

It was dangerous work that would have been worth singing about by the nightingales.

Smirre followed the otter with his eyes, as well as he could.

He saw that the otter was constantly getting closer to the geese and thought he also saw that he was already about to climb up to them.

But now the otter suddenly screamed wildly and shrilly.

Smirre saw him falling backwards into the water and being carried away like a blind young kitten.

Only a moment later the geese flapped their wings hard; they all rose and flew away to find another resting place.

Soon after, the otter climbed onto the bank. He didn't say a word but only began to lick one of his front paws.

But when Smirre mocked him for failing, he couldn't contain himself.

My swimming skills didn't fail, Smire. I had come up to the geese and just wanted to climb up to them when a little manikin made a dart for me and stuck a sharp iron into my foot.

It hurt me so much that I lost my balance, and then the maelstrom caught me." He didn't have to add anything else. Smirre was already gone and on his way to the geese.

Once again Akka and the geese had to flee at night.

Luckily the moon was still in the sky and by its light she managed to find one of the other resting places she knew in this area.

She flew southwards again, along the shining river.

They flew over the manor house of Tiefental and over Ronnebys dark roof and white waterfall without settling down.

But some distance south of the town, not far from the sea, you find Ronneby's spa with its bathhouse and spring house, large inns and summer residences for its spa guests.

All these buildings are deserted and vacant the whole winter time, something all the birds know well enough, and many flocks of birds seek shelter during these hard, stormy times on the balconies and terraces of the big buildings.

The wild geese alighted on a balcony and as was their custom, fell asleep straight away.

The boy, however, couldn't sleep, because he no longer dared to crawl under the gander's wing.

When he lay there bedded between feathers and down he couldn't see anything and only heard little.

Then he could not ensure the safety of the white gander, that was the only thing dear to him.

And it had indeed been well that he had not slept that night for otherwise he would not have been able to chase away the marten and the otter.

No, sleep would come or not as the case may be, he shouldn't think of himself anymore, he needed to think first and foremost of the gander.

The boy sat on a balcony facing south so that he had a view of the sea.

And since he could not sleep, however, and had the sea with its tongues of land and bays before him, he had to think instinctively how beautiful it would be if the sea and land collided as it did here in Blekinge.

After all he had seen, the sea and land could meet in many different ways.

In many places the land came down to the sea with gentle rolling meadows and the sea approached the land with drifting sand which it put down in mounds and embankments.

It was as if the two of them could suffer so little that they wanted to show each other only the worst thing they had; but it also appeared that, when the sea reached the land, the land erected a mountainous wall in front of itself, as if the sea was something dangerous, and when the land did this, the sea attacked it with surges of waves, lashed and snorted and struck against the cliffs and looked as if it wanted to tear the hill country to pieces.

But here in Blekinge things were different when the sea and the land came together.

Here, the land split itself into headlands and islands and islets, and the sea split up into fjords and bays and sounds, and hence it appeared as if the two of them wanted to meet peacefully and amicably.
Now the boy was thinking most of all of the sea. It lay so desolately and lonely and endlessly there and tossed its gray waves constantly.

When he approached the land and met the first island, he fooded it, tore off all its greenery and made it as barren and gray as it was itself.

And then it encountered another island and the same thing happened again.

And once again it met an island, yes, and the same thing happened as with the previous one.

This too was stripped and ravaged as if it had fallen into the hands of robbers.

But then the spaces between the islands in the archipelago became smaller and smaller and the sea did see that the land was sending out its small children to entreat it to be lenient.

It became increasingly friendly, the further it inland it came, its waves rolled less high, it dampened its storms, left its green in the fissures and gullies, and divided itself into small sounds and bays; inland it was finally so harmless that small boats dared to go out on the gentle waters.

It certainly didn't know itself anymore, so friendly and meek it had become.

Then the boy was thinking of the mainland. Solemnly it lays there and was the same almost everywhere.

It was made up of flat cultivated fields, between which lay here and there a meadow bordered by birch trees, or also of long stretches of forested mountain ridges; it lay there as if it would only think about oats and turnips and potatoes, and about fir trees and spruces.

Next there was an ocean bay that cut deep into the land.

The land however did not mind that, but bordered it with birches and alders, just as if it was a friendly sweet water lake.

Then the next bay pushed inland.

But again the land did not mind that, the bay received the same lining as the last one.

But the bays began to broaden and to split; they shattered the fields and woods, and then the land had no choice but to take notice.

I truely believe the sea is actually coming itself," said the land and rapidly started to adorn itself.

It adorned itself with flowers, took on an undulating shape and even pushed small islands into the sea.

It did not want to know anything more of spruces and fir trees, but threw them off like old work clothes and arrayed itself with great oaks, linden, chestnuts and with flowering meadows, and became as beautiful as a manor house park.

And when it encountered the sea the former had changed that much that it did not recogonize itself.

The boy had wandered so far in his thoughts, when he was suddenly startled by an eerie howling, that sounded from the bathhouse park.

And when he rose he saw a fox standing in the white moonlight on the lawn below the balcony.

Because Smirre had followed the geese again.

But when he found the spot where they had alighted he realized that he now could not reach them in any way and because of his anger he had then started howling loudly.

When the fox was howling like that, the old Akka awoke, and though she could hardly see anything, she did think she recognized the voice.

"Is it you, Smirre, who is out tonight?" she asked.

"Yes," Smirre answered, "it's me, and I would like to ask now, how you geese like the night I have prepared for you?" "Do you mean to say that is was you who set the marten and the otter on us?" Akka asked.

"A good deed shouldn't be denied," Smirre said.

"You have played the goose with me once, now I've begun to play fox with you; also, I don't intend to end it as long as one of you still lives, even if I have to pursue you across the whole country." "You should however consider whether that is right what you do, Smirre, if you, who are armed with teeth and claws, chase us defenceless ones in this way," said Akka.

Smirre now believed that Akka was afraid and therefore said quickly: "If you, Akka, throw the tomte who got so much in my way down to me then I will make my peace with you and will never ever do evil to you nor any of your kind again." "I cannot hand out the tomte to you," Akka said.

"There is noone among us, neither the youngest nor the oldest who would not gladly give its life for him." "If you love him so much," Smirre replied, "then he shall be the first one on whom I will take my revenge, I promise you that!" Akka did not answer and after Smirre had been howling for a few times, there was silence.

The boy was still awake and looked through the balcony rail at the archipelago.

A moment ago he'd had such pleasant and happy thoughts.

Like dance and fun, they had poped into his brain, and he wished them to come back.

But it was no longer possible for him to look at the landscape with the same eyes as before, and the nice thoughts did not want to come back.

Then he realized that the beautiful reflections are elusive and delicate, and that hate and strife are always chasing them away.
unit 1
Am Ronnebyfluß.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 6
Er sah sogleich, daß eine der Gänse weiß war, und da wußte er ja, mit wem er es zu tun hatte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 16
Smirre stand oben auf dem Gebirgskamm und schaute zu den Wildgänsen hinunter.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 17
„Diese Verfolgung kannst du ebensogut gleich aufgeben,“ sagte er zu sich selbst.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 19
Diese Gänse sind dir zu klug, Reineke.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 21
Während er sie so betrachtete, dachte er an all das Böse, das sie ihm zugefügt hatten.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 26
unit 29
Er begrüßte den Marder sehr freundlich und gratulierte zu dem Ausfall der Jagd.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 30
Smirre setzte seine Worte sehr gut, wie dies beim Fuchs immer der Fall ist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 34
Der Marder stürzte mit gekrümmtem Rücken und gesträubtem Fell auf ihn zu.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 35
Hast du Wildgänse gesehen?“ zischte er ihn an.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 36
„Wo sind sie?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 40
Und gleich nachher erklang starkes Flügelschlagen, und alle Gänse flogen in wilder Hast auf.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 42
Der Ärmste war patschnaß und hielt ab und zu an, um sich den Kopf mit den Vorderpfoten zu reiben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 46
Er hatte keinen Zuhörer mehr.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 47
Smirre war schon weit weg hinter den Gänsen her.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 48
Indessen war Akka südwärts geflogen, eine neue Schlafstelle zu suchen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 59
Aber sie mußten zufrieden sein, wenn sie nur vor Raubtieren sicher waren.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 60
Nach einer Weile kam Smirre am Flußufer dahergerannt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 67
Der Fischotter wendete nicht einmal den Kopf nach dem Strom.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 68
„Dies ist nicht das erstemal, daß wir uns begegnen, Smirre,“ sagte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 75
Er schwamm in das stille Wasser hinter die Steine und kam so allmählich den Gänsen immer näher.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 76
unit 77
Smirre folgte dem Otter mit den Blicken, so gut er konnte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 79
Aber jetzt schrie der Otter plötzlich wild und gellend auf.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 80
unit 82
Bald nachher kletterte der Otter ans Ufer.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 83
Er sagte kein Wort, sondern begann nur, seine eine Vorderpfote zu lecken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 84
Aber als Smirre ihn verspottete, weil es ihm mißglückt sei, brach er los.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 85
„An meiner Schwimmkunst fehlte es nicht, Smirre.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 88
Smirre war schon weg und auf dem Weg zu den Gänsen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 89
Noch einmal mußte Akka mit den Gänsen nächtlicherweile die Flucht ergreifen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 91
Sie flog wieder südwärts, den glänzenden Fluß entlang.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 97
unit 101
Der Junge saß auf einem Balkon, der nach Süden ging, so daß er die Aussicht auf das Meer hatte.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 103
unit 106
Hier in Blekinge aber ging es anders zu, wenn Meer und Land zusammenkamen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 108
Jetzt dachte der Junge vor allem an das Meer.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 109
Es lag so einsam und verlassen und unendlich da und wälzte nur immerfort seine grauen Wogen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 111
Dann traf es wohl nochmals auf ein Eiland, und mit diesem ging es ebenso.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 112
Und abermals traf es auf ein Eiland, ja, und da ging es genau wie bei den vorigen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 113
Auch dieses wurde entkleidet und geplündert, als ob es in Räuberhände gefallen wäre.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 116
Es kannte sich gewiß selbst nicht mehr, so hold und freundlich war es geworden.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 117
Alsdann dachte der Junge an das Festland.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 118
Ernst lag es da und war fast überall gleich.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 120
Dann kam eine Meeresbucht, die tief ins Land einschnitt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 122
Dann schob sich noch eine Bucht hinein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 123
Aber auch daraus machte sich das Land nichts, sie bekam dieselbe Bekleidung wie die vorige.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 126
Es bekränzte sich mit Blumen, nahm Wellenform an und schob sogar kleine Inseln ins Meer hinein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 128
Und als es mit dem Meer zusammentraf, war es so verändert, daß es sich selbst nicht mehr kannte.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 131
Denn Smirre war den Gänsen noch einmal nachgegangen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 134
„Bist du es, Smirre, der heute Nacht unterwegs ist?“ fragte sie.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 136
„Eine gute Tat soll man nicht leugnen,“ sagte Smirre.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 140
Der Junge war noch immer wach und schaute durch das Balkongeländer auf die Schären hinaus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 141
Vorhin hatte er so angenehme und frohe Gedanken gehabt.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 142
Wie Tanz und Spiel waren sie ihm durchs Gehirn gezogen, und er wünschte, daß sie wiederkämen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 130  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 126  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 144  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 111  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 112  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 143  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 107  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 109  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 106  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 56  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 54  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 53  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 131  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 103  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 120  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 79  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 60  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 58  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 57  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 56  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 55  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 54  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 53  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 40  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 43  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 51  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 75  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 95  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 96  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 39  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 48  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 45  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 36  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 32  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 117  2 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 141  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 85  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 1  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 22  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 16  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 20  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 27  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 26  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 25  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 24  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 23  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 21  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 18  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 17  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 91  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 88  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 77  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 141  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 30  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 34  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 3  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 11  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 10  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 1  2 months, 1 week ago

Am Ronnebyfluß.

Weder die Wildgänse noch der Fuchs Smirre hatten geglaubt, daß sie je wieder zusammentreffen würden, nachdem dieser Schonen verlassen hatte.

Aber nun geschah es, daß die Wildgänse ihren Weg über Blekinge nahmen, und da hatte sich Smirre auch hinbegeben.

Er hatte die Zeit bis jetzt in dem nördlichen Teil dieser Landschaft verbracht und war äußerst mißvergnügt über diesen Aufenthalt.

Eines Nachmittags, als Smirre in einer einsamen Waldgegend, nicht weit von dem Ronnebyfluß entfernt, umherstreifte, sah er eine Schar Wildgänse daherfliegen.

Er sah sogleich, daß eine der Gänse weiß war, und da wußte er ja, mit wem er es zu tun hatte.

Und sofort begann Smirre hinter den Gänsen herzujagen, einmal, weil ihn nach einer guten Mahlzeit gelüstete, dann aber auch in der Absicht, sich für all den Verdruß zu rächen, den sie ihm bereitet hatten.

Er sah sie ostwärts bis zum Ronnebyfluß fliegen; dort änderten sie die Richtung und zogen weiter nach Süden.

Er erriet, daß sie sich am Flußufer eine Schlafstätte suchten, und hoffte, ohne besondre Schwierigkeit einige von ihnen erwischen zu können.

Aber als Smirre endlich den Ort erblickte, wo die Gänse sich niedergelassen hatten, entdeckte er, daß es ein sehr gut beschützter Platz war, und daß er ihnen nicht beikommen konnte.

Der Ronnebyfluß ist zwar kein großer und mächtiger Wasserlauf, aber er ist seiner schönen Ufer wegen doch sehr berühmt.

Einmal ums andre zwängt er sich zwischen steilen Gebirgswänden hindurch, die senkrecht aus dem Wasser aufragen und vollständig mit Geißblatt, Faulkirschen und Weißdorn, mit Erlen, Ebereschen und Weiden bewachsen sind;

an einem schönen Sommertag gibt es nicht leicht etwas Angenehmeres, als auf dem kleinen, dunklen Fluß dahinzurudern und hinaufzuschauen in all das Grün, das sich an den rauhen Felswänden festklammert.

Aber jetzt, als die Wildgänse und Smirre an den Fluß kamen, herrschte noch der kalte, rauhe Vorfrühling, alle Bäume standen noch kahl, und niemand dachte auch nur mit einem Gedanken daran, ob die Ufer schön oder häßlich seien.

Die Wildgänse waren indes sehr froh, daß sie unter einer so steilen Bergwand einen schmalen Sandstreifen sahen, gerade groß genug, um die ganze Schar aufzunehmen.

Vor ihnen brauste der Fluß, der jetzt, wo der Schnee schmolz, wild und angeschwollen war, hinter sich hatten sie die unbesteigbaren Felsenwände, und herabhängende Zweige verdeckten sie; sie hätten es nicht besser haben können.

Smirre stand oben auf dem Gebirgskamm und schaute zu den Wildgänsen hinunter.

„Diese Verfolgung kannst du ebensogut gleich aufgeben,“ sagte er zu sich selbst.

„Einen so steilen Berg kannst du nicht hinunterklettern, durch den wilden Strom kannst du nicht schwimmen, und unten am Berg ist auch nicht der kleinste Streifen Land, der zur Schlafstelle der Gänse führen würde.

Diese Gänse sind dir zu klug, Reineke. Gib dir keine Mühe mehr, sie zu jagen.“

Aber wie andern Füchsen auch, wurde es Smirre schwer, ein halb ausgeführtes Unternehmen aufzugeben; er legte sich deshalb ganz außen an den Bergrand und verwandte kein Auge von den Wildgänsen.

Während er sie so betrachtete, dachte er an all das Böse, das sie ihm zugefügt hatten.

Ja, ihre Schuld war es, daß er aus Schonen verbannt worden war und nach Blekinge hatte flüchten müssen, wo er bis jetzt noch keinen Herrenhofpark, keine zahmen Gänse, kein Wildgehege voller Rehe und leckerer Rehzicklein gesehen hatte.

Er arbeitete sich in eine solche Wut hinein, während er so dalag, daß er den Gänsen Tod und Verderben wünschte, sogar wenn er selbst nicht dazu kommen sollte, sie zu verspeisen.

Als Smirres Zorn diesen hohen Grad erreicht hatte, hörte er in einer großen Kiefer dicht neben sich ein Geraschel, und er sah ein Eichhörnchen, das von einem Marder heftig verfolgt wurde, den Baum herunterlaufen.

Keines von den beiden bemerkte Smirre, der sich ganz ruhig verhielt und der Jagd zusah, die von Baum zu Baum ging.

Er betrachtete das Eichhörnchen, das so leicht durch die Bäume huschte, als ob es fliegen könnte.

Er betrachtete auch den Marder, der kein so kunstgerechter Kletterer war wie das Eichhörnchen, aber doch die Baumstämme hinauf und hinunter lief, als seien es ebene Waldpfade.

„Könnte ich nur halb so gut klettern wie eins von diesen beiden,“ dachte der Fuchs, „dann dürften die dort drunten nicht länger in Ruhe schlafen.“

Sobald die Jagd zu Ende und das Eichhörnchen gefangen war, ging Smirre zu dem Marder hin, machte aber zum Zeichen, daß er ihn seiner Jagdbeute nicht berauben wolle, auf zwei Schritt Abstand vor ihm Halt.

Er begrüßte den Marder sehr freundlich und gratulierte zu dem Ausfall der Jagd.

Smirre setzte seine Worte sehr gut, wie dies beim Fuchs immer der Fall ist.

Der Marder dagegen, der sich mit seinem langen, schmalen Körper, seinem feinen Kopf, seinem weichen Fell und seinem hellbraunen Fleck am Halse wie ein kleines Wunder von Schönheit ausnimmt, ist in Wirklichkeit nur ein ungeschlachter Waldbewohner und gab dem Fuchs kaum eine Antwort.

„Nur eins verwundert mich,“ fuhr Smirre fort, „daß sich ein solcher Jäger wie du mit der Jagd auf Eichhörnchen begnügt, wenn sich so viel besseres Wildbret in erreichbarer Nähe befindet.“

Hier hielt er inne und wartete auf eine Erwiderung, aber als der Marder ihn, ohne ein Wort zu sagen, ganz unverschämt angrinste, fuhr er fort: „Wäre es möglich, daß du die Wildgänse dort unten an der Felswand nicht gesehen hättest?

Oder bist du kein so guter Kletterer, daß du nicht zu ihnen hinunter gelangen könntest?“

Diesmal brauchte Smirre nicht auf Antwort zu warten.

Der Marder stürzte mit gekrümmtem Rücken und gesträubtem Fell auf ihn zu.

Hast du Wildgänse gesehen?“ zischte er ihn an.

„Wo sind sie? Sag es schnell, sonst beiße ich dir die Gurgel entzwei.“

„Nun, nun, vergiß nicht, daß ich doppelt so groß bin als du, und sei ein bißchen höflich.

Ich wünsche gar nichts weiter, als dir die Wildgänse zu zeigen.“

Einen Augenblick später war der Marder auf dem Wege den Abhang hinunter, und während Smirre zusah, wie er seinen schlangendünnen Körper von Zweig zu Zweig schwang, dachte er: „Dieser schöne Baumjäger hat das grausamste Herz der ganzen Schöpfung.

Ich glaube, die Wildgänse werden mir für ein blutiges Erwachen zu danken haben.“

Aber gerade, als Smirre den Todesschrei der Gänse zu hören erwartete, sah er den Marder in den Fluß hinunterplumpsen, so daß das Wasser hoch aufspritzte.

Und gleich nachher erklang starkes Flügelschlagen, und alle Gänse flogen in wilder Hast auf.

Smirre wollte den Gänsen schnell nachjagen, aber er war so neugierig zu erfahren, wie sie gerettet worden waren, daß er stehen blieb, bis der Marder wieder heraufgeklettert kam.

Der Ärmste war patschnaß und hielt ab und zu an, um sich den Kopf mit den Vorderpfoten zu reiben.

„Ich habe mir doch gedacht, daß du ein Tölpel wärst und in den Fluß fallen würdest,“ sagte Smirre verächtlich.

„Ich habe mich nicht tölpelhaft angestellt, und du hast nicht nötig, mich zu schelten,“ erwiderte der Marder.

„Ich saß schon auf einem der untersten Zweige und überlegte, wie ich eine ganze Menge von ihnen töten könnte, als ein kleiner Knirps, nicht größer als ein Eichhörnchen, aufsprang und mir mit solcher Kraft einen Stein an den Kopf warf, daß ich ins Wasser purzelte, und ehe ich wieder aus dem Wasser herauskrabbeln konnte – –“

Der Marder brauchte nicht weiter zu berichten.

Er hatte keinen Zuhörer mehr.

Smirre war schon weit weg hinter den Gänsen her.

Indessen war Akka südwärts geflogen, eine neue Schlafstelle zu suchen.

Es war noch ein wenig Tagesschein vorhanden, und der Halbmond stand hoch am Himmel, so daß sie einigermaßen sehen konnte.

Zum Glück kannte sie sich gut in der Gegend aus, denn es war mehr als einmal vorgekommen, daß die Gänse, wenn sie im Frühjahr über die Ostsee flogen, nach Blekinge verschlagen worden waren.

Sie flog also am Fluß hin, solange sie ihn durch die mondscheinbeglänzte Landschaft wie eine schwarze, blinkende Schlange dahingleiten sah.

Auf diese Weise gelangten sie bis hinunter zum Tiefen Fall, wo der Fluß sich in einer unterirdischen Rinne verbirgt und dann klar und durchsichtig, wie wenn er von Glas wäre, sich in eine enge Schlucht hinabstürzt, auf deren Boden er in glitzernde Tropfen und umherspritzenden Schaum zerschellt.

Unterhalb des Falles lagen einige Steine, zwischen denen das Wasser in wilden Wirbeln aufschäumte, und hier ließ sich Akka nieder.

Dies war wieder ein guter Ruheplatz, besonders so spät am Abend, wo keine Menschen mehr unterwegs waren.

Bei Sonnenuntergang hätten die Gänse sich nicht gut hier niederlassen können, denn der Tiefe Fall liegt in keiner öden Gegend.

Auf der einen Seite erhebt sich eine große Kartonnagefabrik, und auf der andern, die steil und mit Bäumen bestanden ist, liegt der Park von Tiefental, in dem beständig auf den schlüpfrigen und steilen Pfaden Menschen umherstreifen, die sich an dem tobenden Brausen des wilden Stromes erfreuen wollen.

Es war hier gerade wie an dem ersten Platz; keine der Gänse schenkte der Tatsache, daß sie an einen weltberühmten Platz gekommen waren, auch nur einen Gedanken.

Später dachten sie freilich, es sei unheimlich und gefährlich, auf solchen glatten, nassen Steinen mitten in einem Stromwirbel zu schlafen, der vielleicht aufwallen und sie mit fortreißen würde.

Aber sie mußten zufrieden sein, wenn sie nur vor Raubtieren sicher waren.

Nach einer Weile kam Smirre am Flußufer dahergerannt.

Er erblickte die Gänse, die da draußen in den schäumenden Stromschnellen standen, und sah sogleich, daß er auch hier nicht zu ihnen gelangen konnte.

Er fühlte sich sehr gedemütigt, ja, es war ihm, als stehe sein ganzes Ansehen als Jäger auf dem Spiel.

Während er darüber nachdachte, sah er einen Fischotter mit einem Fisch im Maul aus dem Wirbel heraussteigen.

Smirre ging auf ihn zu, blieb aber mit zwei Schritt Entfernung vor ihm stehen, um zu zeigen, daß er ihm seine Jagdbeute nicht nehmen wolle.

„Du bist ein merkwürdiger Kerl, daß du dich mit Fischen begnügst, wenn doch die Steine dort draußen voller Gänse stehen,“ sagte Smirre.

Er war so erregt, daß er sich nicht Zeit nahm, seine Worte so wohl zu setzen, wie es sonst seine Gewohnheit war.

Der Fischotter wendete nicht einmal den Kopf nach dem Strom.

„Dies ist nicht das erstemal, daß wir uns begegnen, Smirre,“ sagte er.

Er war ein Landstreicher, wie alle Fischotter, und hatte oft am Vombsee gefischt, wo er auch mit Smirre zusammengetroffen war.

„Ich weiß wohl, wie du es anfängst, dir eine Lachsforelle zu ergattern.“

„Ach, bist du es, Greifan?“ sagte Smirre erfreut, weil er wußte, daß dieser Fischotter ein kühner und gewandter Schwimmer war.

„Da wundert es mich nicht, daß du die Wildgänse gar nicht ansehen magst, denn du bist ja nicht imstande, zu ihnen hinzukommen.“

Aber der Otter, der Schwimmhäute zwischen den Zehen, einen steifen Schwanz, der so gut wie ein Ruder ist, und einen Pelz hat, durch den das Wasser nicht dringen kann, wollte sich nicht nachsagen lassen, daß es einen Wasserwirbel gebe, den er nicht bewältigen könne.

Er wendete sich dem Strome zu, und sobald er die Wildgänse erblickte, stürzte er sich über das steile Ufer in den Fluß hinein.

Wäre der Frühling etwas weiter vorgeschritten und die Nachtigallen schon im Park von Tiefental eingetroffen gewesen, dann hätten diese sicher in vielen Nächten Greifans Kampf mit den Wasserwirbeln besungen.

Denn der Otter wurde oft von den Wogen zurückgeworfen und in die Tiefe hinuntergerissen, aber er arbeitete sich immer wieder herauf und weiter nach den großen Steinen hin.

Er schwamm in das stille Wasser hinter die Steine und kam so allmählich den Gänsen immer näher.

Es war ein gefährliches Werk, das wohl wert gewesen wäre, von den Nachtigallen besungen zu werden.

Smirre folgte dem Otter mit den Blicken, so gut er konnte.

Er sah, daß dieser beständig näher an die Gänse herankam, und glaubte überdies zu sehen, daß er schon im Begriff war, zu ihnen hinaufzuklettern.

Aber jetzt schrie der Otter plötzlich wild und gellend auf.

Smirre sah, wie er rückwärts ins Wasser fiel und mitgerissen wurde wie ein blindes junges Kätzchen.

Gleich darauf schlugen die Gänse hart mit den Flügeln; sie erhoben sich alle und flogen davon, sich wieder einen andern Ruheplatz zu suchen.

Bald nachher kletterte der Otter ans Ufer. Er sagte kein Wort, sondern begann nur, seine eine Vorderpfote zu lecken.

Aber als Smirre ihn verspottete, weil es ihm mißglückt sei, brach er los.

„An meiner Schwimmkunst fehlte es nicht, Smirre. Ich war bis zu den Gänsen gekommen und wollte eben zu ihnen hinaufklettern, als ein kleiner Knirps auf mich lossprang und mich mit einem scharfen Eisen in den Fuß stach.

Das tat mir so weh, daß ich das Gleichgewicht verlor, und dann ergriff mich der Wirbel.“

Er brauchte nicht weiter zu erzählen. Smirre war schon weg und auf dem Weg zu den Gänsen.

Noch einmal mußte Akka mit den Gänsen nächtlicherweile die Flucht ergreifen.

Zum Glück war der Mond noch am Himmel, und bei dessen Schein gelang es ihr, eine von den andern Schlafstellen zu finden, die sie in dieser Gegend kannte.

Sie flog wieder südwärts, den glänzenden Fluß entlang.

Über dem Herrenhof von Tiefental und über Ronnebys dunklem Dach und weißem Wasserfall flog sie hin, ohne sich niederzulassen.

Aber eine Strecke südlicher von der Stadt, nicht weit vom Meere, liegt die Ronnebyer Heilquelle mit ihrem Bade- und Quellenhaus, mit großen Gasthöfen und Sommerwohnungen für die Badegäste.

Alles dies steht den ganzen Winter hindurch öde und leer, was alle Vögel zur Genüge wissen, und viele Vogelscharen suchen bei harten, stürmischen Zeiten auf den Altanen und Veranden der großen Gebäude Schutz.

Hier ließen sich die Wildgänse auf einem Balkon nieder, und ihrer Gewohnheit gemäß schliefen sie sogleich ein.

Der Junge dagegen konnte nicht schlafen, weil er jetzt bei Nacht nicht mehr ohne weitres unter den Flügel des Gänserichs zu kriechen wagte.

Wenn er da zwischen Federn und Flaum gebettet lag, konnte er gar nichts sehen und nur schlecht hören.

Dann konnte er nicht über die Sicherheit des weißen Gänserichs wachen, und das war ja das einzige, was ihm wichtig war.

Und wie gut war es gewesen, daß er in dieser Nacht nicht geschlafen hatte, sonst hätte er nicht den Marder und den Otter verjagen können.

Nein, es mochte mit dem Schlaf gehen wie es wollte, er durfte jetzt nicht mehr an sich selbst, er mußte in erster Linie an den Gänserich denken.

Der Junge saß auf einem Balkon, der nach Süden ging, so daß er die Aussicht auf das Meer hatte.

Und da er nun doch nicht schlafen konnte und das Meer mit seinen Landzungen und Buchten vor sich hatte, mußte er unwillkürlich denken, wie schön das sei, wenn Meer und Land so zusammenstießen wie hier in Blekinge.

Nach all dem, was er gesehen hatte, konnten Meer und Land auf die verschiedenste Weise zusammentreffen.

An vielen Orten kam das Land zum Meer hinunter mit flachen hügeligen Wiesen, und das Meer kam ihm mit Flugsand entgegen, den es in Haufen und Wällen niederlegte.

Es war, als könnten sich die beiden so wenig leiden, daß sie einander nur das Schlechteste, was sie besaßen, zeigen wollten;

aber es kam auch vor, daß das Land, wenn das Meer zu ihm hinkam, eine Gebirgsmauer vor sich aufrichtete, als sei das Meer etwas Gefährliches, und wenn das Land dies tat, fuhr das Meer mit wilder Brandung darauf los, peitschte und schnaubte und schlug gegen die Klippen und sah aus, als wolle es das Hügelland zerreißen.

Hier in Blekinge aber ging es anders zu, wenn Meer und Land zusammenkamen.

Hier zersplitterte das Land sich in Landzungen und Inseln und Holme, und das Meer verteilte sich in Fjorde und Buchten und Sunde, und daher kam es vielleicht, daß es aussah, als wollten die beiden einträchtig und friedlich zusammenkommen.
Jetzt dachte der Junge vor allem an das Meer. Es lag so einsam und verlassen und unendlich da und wälzte nur immerfort seine grauen Wogen.

Wenn es sich dem Land näherte und auf das erste Eiland traf, überflutete es dieses, riß alles Grüne ab und machte es ebenso kahl und grau wie es selbst ist.

Dann traf es wohl nochmals auf ein Eiland, und mit diesem ging es ebenso.

Und abermals traf es auf ein Eiland, ja, und da ging es genau wie bei den vorigen.

Auch dieses wurde entkleidet und geplündert, als ob es in Räuberhände gefallen wäre.

Aber dann wurden die Schären immer dichter, und das Meer sah wohl ein, daß das Land ihm seine kleinen Kinder entgegenschickte, es zur Milde zu bewegen.

Es wurde auch immer freundlicher, je weiter es hereinkam, es rollte seine Wogen weniger hoch, dämpfte seine Stürme, ließ das Grüne in den Spalten und Rinnen stehen und verteilte sich in kleine Sunde und Buchten, und am Land drinnen war es schließlich so ungefährlich, daß sich kleine Boote auf die sanfte Flut hinauswagten.

Es kannte sich gewiß selbst nicht mehr, so hold und freundlich war es geworden.

Alsdann dachte der Junge an das Festland. Ernst lag es da und war fast überall gleich.

Es bestand aus flachen Ackerfeldern, zwischen denen hier und da ein von Birken eingefriedigter Weideplatz lag, oder auch aus langgestreckten, bewaldeten Bergrücken; es lag da, als dächte es nur an Hafer und Rüben und Kartoffeln, an Tannen und Fichten.

Dann kam eine Meeresbucht, die tief ins Land einschnitt.

Daraus machte sich das Land aber nichts, sondern umrandete sie mit Birken und Erlen, ganz als sei sie ein freundlicher Süßwassersee.

Dann schob sich noch eine Bucht hinein.

Aber auch daraus machte sich das Land nichts, sie bekam dieselbe Bekleidung wie die vorige.

Doch die Meerbusen begannen sich auszuweiten und sich zu teilen; sie zersplitterten die Felder und Wälder, und da konnte das Land nicht mehr anders, es mußte Notiz davon nehmen.

„Ich glaube wahrhaftig, das Meer selbst kommt daher,“ sagte das Land und fing schnell an, sich zu schmücken.

Es bekränzte sich mit Blumen, nahm Wellenform an und schob sogar kleine Inseln ins Meer hinein.

Es wollte nichts mehr von Fichten und Kiefern wissen, sondern warf sie ab wie alte Werktagskleider und machte Staat mit großen Eichbäumen, Linden, Kastanien und mit blühenden Auen, und wurde so schön wie der Park eines Herrenhofs.

Und als es mit dem Meer zusammentraf, war es so verändert, daß es sich selbst nicht mehr kannte.

So weit war der Junge in seinen Gedanken gekommen, als ihn plötzlich ein langes, unheimliches Heulen, das vom Badehauspark herklang, aufschreckte.

Und als er sich aufrichtete, sah er auf dem Rasen unter dem Balkon einen Fuchs im weißen Mondschein stehen.

Denn Smirre war den Gänsen noch einmal nachgegangen.

Aber als er den Platz, wo sie sich niedergelassen hatten, fand, sah er ein, daß er jetzt auf keine Weise zu ihnen gelangen konnte, und da hatte er vor lauter Wut laut hinausgeheult.

Als der Fuchs so heulte, erwachte die alte Akka, und obgleich sie fast nichts sehen konnte, glaubte sie doch die Stimme zu erkennen.

„Bist du es, Smirre, der heute Nacht unterwegs ist?“ fragte sie.

„Ja,“ antwortete Smirre, „ich bins, und ich will jetzt fragen, wie euch Gänsen die Nacht gefällt, die ich euch bereitet habe?“

„Willst du damit sagen, daß du es gewesen bist, der den Marder und den Otter auf uns gehetzt hat?“ fragte Akka.

„Eine gute Tat soll man nicht leugnen,“ sagte Smirre.

„Ihr habt einmal das Gänsespiel mit mir getrieben, jetzt hab ich angefangen, das Fuchsspiel mit euch zu treiben; ich hab auch nicht im Sinn, es zu beendigen, solange noch eine von euch am Leben ist, und wenn ich euch durchs ganze Land verfolgen müßte.“

„Du solltest dir aber doch überlegen, ob das recht von dir ist, Smirre, wenn du, der mit Zähnen und Krallen bewaffnet ist, uns, die verteidigungslosen, auf diese Weise verfolgst,“ sagte Akka.

Smirre glaubte jetzt, Akka habe Angst, und deshalb sagte er schnell: „Wenn du, Akka, mir den kleinen Däumling, der mir so in die Quere gekommen ist, herunterwirfst, dann will ich Frieden mit euch schließen und werde weder dir noch einer von den deinen je wieder etwas Böses tun.“

„Den Däumling kann ich dir nicht geben,“ sagte Akka.

„Von der jüngsten bis zur ältesten ist keine unter uns, die nicht gern das Leben für ihn lassen würde.“

„Wenn ihr ihn so lieb habt,“ erwiderte Smirre, „dann soll er der erste sein, an dem ich meine Rache kühlen werde, das verspreche ich euch!“

Akka gab keine Antwort mehr, und nachdem Smirre noch ein paarmal aufgeheult hatte, wurde alles still.

Der Junge war noch immer wach und schaute durch das Balkongeländer auf die Schären hinaus.

Vorhin hatte er so angenehme und frohe Gedanken gehabt.

Wie Tanz und Spiel waren sie ihm durchs Gehirn gezogen, und er wünschte, daß sie wiederkämen.

Aber er konnte die Landschaft nicht mehr mit denselben Blicken betrachten wie vorher, und die schönen Gedanken wollten nicht wiederkehren.

Da erkannte er, daß die schönen Gedanken scheu und empfindlich sind, und daß Haß und Unfriede sie immer verjagen.