de-en  Die_Hessen_im_Krieg_gegen_Amerika_ Kapitel_5_Von_Deutschland_nach_Amerika
Chapter 5: From Germany to America.

The first German troops who went to America, were those of Brunswick.

These marched on February 22, 1776, 2282 men strong, from Brunswick and embarked in Stade, near the mouth of the river Elbe.

The second Braunschweig division, about 2000 men, embarked at the end of May.

The first Hessian division started off at the beginning of March from Cassel and embarked in Bremerlehe, close to the Weser Estuary; the second division followed in June; together they comprised between twelve and thirteen thousand men.

They were for the most part excellent and well-equipped troops, for the small army of the landgrave was considered one of the best in Germany.

The march from Brunswick and Cassel to the harbours was a comparatively easy matter.

The troops came from the territories of their own princes into the Hanoverian territories of the King of England, which reached right to the sea.

The Prince of Waldeck sent his regiment through Cassel without disturbance.

The Count of Hesse-Hanau, the Margrave of Anspach-Bayreuth and the Prince of Anwalt-Zerbst had to take a longer route and to overcome greater difficulties.

The troops of the latter were to be sent down the river Rhine by boats.

Apart from several small German states situated on the Rhine which could have refused them passage, it was Prussia, whose territories they had to pass through, which was capable of causing them the most trouble.

Frederick the Great even withheld permission from his own nephew, the Margrave of Anspach, to pass through his land.

In a letter to him he expressed his surprise that German princes were to sacrifice the blood of their own subjects for foreign interests.

Besides, it was a small act of revenge against England because of her misconduct concering the port of Gdansk.

Seume left behind the following description of his experiences on the voyage: "In the English transport ships we were pressed together, over and under each other and pickled like herrings.

To save space, instead of hammocks, bed crates had been installed between decks one above the other in the already narrow space.

Below deck a grown man could not stand upright, and in the crate bed he could not sit upright.

The bed crates were for six men each.

When four were lying in them there was no more room left and the last two had to be jammed in.

In warm weather it wasn't cold: for the individual it was completely impossible to turn over and just as impossible to lay on one's back.

One had to lie completely straight on one's side.

So, after we had dutifully sweated and roasted on one side, the right wing-man called out: About face! and so we regrouped: once we had suffered the same fate on the other side, the left wing-man called out the same.

The rations weren't any better than the accommodation.

Bacon and peas today, peas and bacon tomorrow; at times groats and peal barley and as a treat pudding which we had to cook with stale flower and a mixture of salt water and sweet water and old tallow.

The bacon was most likely four or five years old, had black streaks on both sides towards the edges, further inside it was yellow and only had in the middle a small white section.

The same was true for the salted beef.

In the hardtack there were often lots of worms, which we had to eat as fat if we didn't want to eat even less than the already small portion we had: it was that hard that we often needed cannon balls to break it up; hunger seldom allowing us to soften it by soaking; besides there was often not enough water.

We were told, and this is not really improbable, that the hard tack was French; the English had taken it from the French in the Seven Years' War, since that time is is said to have been in a warehouse in Portsmouth, and now the Germans were fed with it, to kill, God willing, the French again, lead by Rochambeau and Lafayette, in America.

But God must not have really wanted it.

The heavily sulfurized water was awfully foul.

When a barrel was lifted up and prised open, the rank smell on deck was a mixture of all kinds of evil odours.

It was filled with finger-length worms, and it had to be filtered through towels before you could drink it; and then you still had to hold your nose.

Rum and sometimes a little strong beer improved the beverage. Penned up in this way, with air you could hardly breathe, with unpalatable food and foul water, many of them only insufficiently clothed, these young men, old people, students, merchants and peasants were tossed around on the Atlantic ociean for months.

Many of the sufferings of the journey were undoubtedly inevitable, and many of the recruits were already accustomed to a hard life.

But much of what they had to endure was the result of an intentional lack of care and great greed.

What should one say about the British Quartermasters' Department, which sent these people out to sea without proper food and drink?

What about the Duke of Brunswick who sent his subjects to Canada without sturdy shoes and stockings and without coats?

Often people have happily endured a hard life, because they understood the reason. But these poor fellows were made to suffer for a fight which was not their own, only to provide the means to pay for the debts or the pleasures of their masters.
unit 1
Kapitel 5: Von Deutschland nach Amerika.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 2
Die ersten deutschen Truppen, welche nach Amerika gingen, waren die Braunschweiger.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 3
Diese marschierten am 22.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 5
Die zweite Braunschweiger Division, ungefähr 2000 Mann, schiffte sich Ende Mai ein.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 8
Der Marsch von Braunschweig und Cassel zu den Häfen war eine verhältnismässig einfache Sache.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 10
Der Fürst von Waldeck schickte sein Regiment durch Cassel ohne Störung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 12
Die Truppen der letzteren sollten auf Booten den Rhein hinuntergeschickt werden.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 19
unit 20
Die Bettkasten waren für je sechs Mann.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 21
Wenn vier darin lagen, waren sie voll und die beiden letzten mussten hineingezwängt werden.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 23
Die geradeste Richtung mit der schärfsten Kante war nötig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 26
Die Verpflegung hielt gleichen Schritt mit der Unterbringung.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 29
Ebenso war es mit dem gesalzenen Rindfleisch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 32
Gott muss aber doch nicht recht gewollt haben.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 33
Das schwergeschwefelte Wasser lag in tiefer Verderbnis.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 41
Oft haben Menschen ein hartes Leben freudig ertragen, weil sie den Grund verstanden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 18  2 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 21  2 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 35  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 32  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 24  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 37  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 17  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 9  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 14  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 26  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 36  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 30  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 23  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 22  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 13  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 4  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 6  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 33  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 41  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 38  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 37  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 2  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 8  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 3  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 29  2 months, 3 weeks ago

Kapitel 5: Von Deutschland nach Amerika.

Die ersten deutschen Truppen, welche nach Amerika gingen, waren die Braunschweiger.

Diese marschierten am 22. Februar 1776, 2282 Mann stark, von Braunschweig ab und wurden in Stade, in der Nähe der Elbmündung, eingeschifft.

Die zweite Braunschweiger Division, ungefähr 2000 Mann, schiffte sich Ende Mai ein.

Die erste hessische Division brach Anfang März von Cassel auf und wurde in Bremerlehe, in der Nähe der Wesermündung, eingeschifft, die zweite Division folgte im Juni; sie zählten zusammen zwischen 12 und 13000 Mann.

Sie waren zum grössten Teil ausgezeichnete und wohlausgerüstete Truppen, denn die kleine Armee des Landgrafen galt als eine der besten in Deutschland.

Der Marsch von Braunschweig und Cassel zu den Häfen war eine verhältnismässig einfache Sache.

Die Truppen kamen aus den Gebieten der eigenen Fürsten in die hannöverschen Landesteile des Königs von England und diese reichten bis an die See.

Der Fürst von Waldeck schickte sein Regiment durch Cassel ohne Störung.

Der Graf von Hessen-Hanau, der Markgraf von Anspach-Bayreuth und der Fürst von Anhalt-Zerbst hatten einen längeren Weg zu machen und grössere Schwierigkeiten zu überwinden.

Die Truppen der letzteren sollten auf Booten den Rhein hinuntergeschickt werden.

Abgesehen von mehreren kleinen deutschen, am Rhein gelegenen Staaten, welche ihnen den Durchgang verwehren konnten, war Preussen, dessen Territorien sie passieren mussten, im Stande, ihnen grosse Schwierigkeiten zu bereiten.

Friedrich der Grosse versagte selbst seinem Neffen, dem Markgrafen von Anspach, seine Einwilligung, sein Land zu passieren.

In einem Brief an ihn drückte er ihm sein Befremden aus, dass deutsche Fürsten das Blut ihrer Landeskinder für fremde Interessen opferten.

Nebenbei war es ein kleiner Akt der Rache an England wegen dessen schlechten Verhaltens inbetreff des Hafens von Danzig.

Seume hat von seinen Erlebnissen auf der Seereise folgende Beschreibung hinterlassen:

»In den englischen Transportschiffen wurden wir gedrückt, geschichtet und gepöckelt wie die Heringe.

Um Platz zu sparen hatte man keine Hängematten sondern Verschläge in der Tabulatur des Verdecks, das schon niedrig genug war, und nun lagen noch zwei Schichten übereinander.

Im Verdecke konnte ein ausgewachsener Mann nicht gerade stehen und im Bettverschlage nicht gerade sitzen.

Die Bettkasten waren für je sechs Mann.

Wenn vier darin lagen, waren sie voll und die beiden letzten mussten hineingezwängt werden.

Das war bei warmem Wetter nicht kalt: es war für den Einzelnen gänzlich unmöglich sich umzuwenden und ebenso unmöglich auf dem Rücken zu liegen.

Die geradeste Richtung mit der schärfsten Kante war nötig.

Wenn wir so auf einer Seite gehörig geschwitzt und gebraten hatten, rief der rechte Flügelmann: Umgewendet! und es wurde umgeschichtet: hatten wir nun auf der andern Seite quantum satis ausgehalten, rief das nämliche der linke Flügelmann.

Die Verpflegung hielt gleichen Schritt mit der Unterbringung.

Heute Speck und Erbsen und morgen Erbsen und Speck; zuweilen Grütze und Graupen und zum Schmause Pudding, den wir aus muffigem Mehl halb mit Seewasser, halb mit süssem Wasser und altem Schöpsenfett machen mussten.

Der Speck mochte wohl vier oder fünf Jahre alt sein, war von beiden Seiten am Rande schwarzstriefig, weiter hinein gelb und hatte nur in der Mitte noch einen kleinen weissen Gang.

Ebenso war es mit dem gesalzenen Rindfleisch.

In dem Schiffsbrot waren oft viele Würmer, die wir als Schmalz mitessen mussten, wenn wir nicht die schon kleine Portion noch mehr reduzieren wollten: dabei war es so hart, dass wir nicht selten Kanonenkugeln brauchten es nur aus dem gröbsten zu zerbrechen;

und doch erlaubte uns der Hunger selten, es einzuweichen; auch fehlte es oft an Wasser.

Man sagte uns, und nicht ganz unwahrscheinlich, der Zwieback sei französisch;

die Engländer hätten ihn noch im siebenjährigen Kriege den Franzosen abgenommen, seit der Zeit habe er in Portsmouth im Magazin gelegen, und nun füttere man die Deutschen damit, um wieder in Amerika die Franzosen unter Rochambeau und Lafayette, so Gott wolle, tot zu schlagen.

Gott muss aber doch nicht recht gewollt haben.

Das schwergeschwefelte Wasser lag in tiefer Verderbnis.

Wenn ein Fass heraufgeschroten und aufgeschlagen wurde, roch es auf dem Verdeck nach einer Mischung von allen möglichen übeln Gerüchen.

Es war angefüllt mit fingerlangen Würmern, und es musste durch Tücher gefüllt werden, bevor man es trinken konnte: und dann musste man immer noch die Nase zuhalten.

Rum und manchmal ein wenig starkes Bier verbesserten das Getränk.«

Auf diese Weise zusammengepfercht, in dicker Luft, mit schlechter Nahrung und faulem Wasser, viele von ihnen ungenügend bekleidet, wurden diese Jünglinge, alten Leute, Studenten, Kaufleute und Bauern Monate lang auf dem Atlantischen Ozean herumgeworfen.

Viele von den Leiden der Reise waren zweifellos unvermeidlich, und viele von den Rekruten waren schon an ein hartes Leben gewöhnt.

Aber Vieles, was sie zu erdulden hatten, war das Resultat von einem absichtlichen Mangel an Fürsorge und grosser Habsucht.

Was soll man sagen über das britische Quartiermeister-Departement, das diese Leute auf die See schickte ohne richtiges Essen und Trinken?

Was vom Herzog von Braunschweig, welcher seine Unterthanen nach Canada ohne haltbare Schuhe und Strümpfe schickte und ohne Mäntel?

Oft haben Menschen ein hartes Leben freudig ertragen, weil sie den Grund verstanden. Aber diese armen Kerle litten für einen Streit, der nicht ihr eigener war, nur um für die Mittel zu sorgen zur Bezahlung der Schulden oder der Vergnügungen ihrer Herren.