de-en  Der Deutsche Lausbub in Amerika - Zweiter Teil - Kapitel 4
The coming of war.

Prehistory of the Spanish-American War. - The guerrilla fighting between Spaniards and Cuban insurgents. The Virginia's soldiers of fortune. - Tense relations between the United States and Spain. - Barbarities. - Cuban junta in New York. - The Destruction of the Maine. The Cry of Revenge. ... - Declaration of War. - My big idea! - The big idea doesn't work! - But I must absolutely go to Cuba ... A heavy cloud of war hung over the new world in 1898. Down south on the island of Cuba, a small war has been raging for years between masters and servants, between a race in decline and evil mixed blood; between Spaniards and Cubans. The rich island, the land of tobacco, the land of sugar had become desperately poor under Spanish mismanagement and the intolerable pressure of taxes burdened on it. The Spanish-Indian half-breeds, the West Indian Negroes and mulattoes, never friends of hard work, were even more thoroughly corrupted by the incompetent Spanish civil service with its mañana-faith of laying its hands in its lap than they already were from mother nature. Corruption was all over the country. Famine followed famine. Bitter misery had prevailed for many years. Then the half-breeds battled in the bushes, and slowly the national-Cuban uprising grew under the leadership of adventurers; a guerrilla war that was fought from both sides with a ferocity and cruelty that took the breath away from neighboring America and reminded it of an old painful episode that had made bad blood in the United States: the death of the men of Virginia.
A decade prior, for as long as the small war was raging between Spaniards and the insurgents, American soldiers of fortune had sailed in the schooner Virginia to Cuba and landed in the south to fight for fame and fortune in the ranks of the revolutionaries. A Spanish gunboat intercepted the schooner. Twenty-four hours later, the Spanish pelotons fired and Virginia's soldiers of fortune were dead. America shook with indignation, even though Washington officially had to stand on the basis of international law and declare that those American adventurers had forfeited the protection of the motherland when they got involved in their illegal enterprise. But the men of Virginia were never forgotten.
As early as the end of 1897, relations between the United States and Spain were strained because Washington had repeatedly and vigorously pointed out that Cuba's tobacco and sugar industry had millions in American money attached to it and that the unsustainable conditions on the island were damaging to the economic interests of the United States. The Spanish General Weyler was sent to the island as captain general, and the fight against the insurgents began on a grand scale. The fierce soldier conceived the system of lines of blockhouses. In a fan shape, small blockhouses protruded from the heavily occupied military centers into the interior of the country in order to crowd the revolutionaries together in an ever advancing, protected line of attack and mile by mile to cleanse the country of them. The trocha slid across the entire width of the island. It was an immense war machine: impenetrable wire mines connected the blockhouses. In front of this belt of small fortresses ran a second line of wolf pits and explosive mines, which already made a mere approach to the trocha a deadly venture.
A terrible slaughter begann. Animal fought against animal, for the half-starved, desperate, outlawed people in the forests had become animals whose machetes cruelly slaughtered every hated Spanish soldier who fell into their hands, and the bitter Spaniards showed themselves to be no less cruel than these. They did not preserve either woman or child. That's how the small war raged. Again and again the trocha were broken through here and there by the insurgents in fighting to the finish; yet these human skeletons, who possessed little more than their weapons, had nothing to lose and everything to hope for. Prisoners were easily shot by the Spaniards: dozens, hundreds. In New York, however, a Cuban junta, a representative of the insurgents, faithfully ensured that American public opinion was informed of every atrocity committed by the Spanish soldiers in writing and images, while the revolutionaries' atrocities were wisely kept quiet. But glaring accounts of hunger, misery, and brutal oppression never fail to have an effect on the American.
Everything urged the United States to involvement. The slowly awakening imperialism, which demanded an expansion of American power and demanded action; the capital and strong economic interests, which not only wanted to save their investments on the neighboring island, but also promised themselves golden mountains from an American Cuba; eventually the train of public opinion, which no longer wanted to see the bloody atrocities in the house of its neighbor.
The mood was tense to burst.
On February 15, 1898, at 9 pm, the great American cruiser Maine flew into the air in the port of Havana and sank instantly. The entire crew of over six hundred men were killed.
Now events were were chasing each other. ...
A cry of indignation screamed over America. Revenge for the Maine! it rushed through the papers: Remember the Maine! ... it was thundered in mass meetings. .... For every American it was obvious that an insidious Spanish torpedo had blown up the Maine and its 600 Americans.
The Cuban insurgents were recognized by the United States government as a belligerent party. Sharp Spanish protest in unseemly terms. Short exchange of notes, which only exacerbated the situation. On 25. April, the American House of Representatives, the Senate and Congress declared a state of war with the Kingdom of Spain.
On the same day, the American fleet in East Asia received telegraphic instructions from Admiral Dewey. After five days, the Spanish fleet of the Philippines was destroyed in the naval battle of Manila on May 1, 1898.
+++ The rascal would not have been the human child full of restlessness and deep-rooted urge for a harsh experience if his adventurous blood would not have been stirred amidst of the noise of war. His soldier's blood may also have come from his grandfather and father, the old officers.
I gobbled up the coursing news and roared with jubilation and joy when Lascelles rushed into the reporters' room with the dispatch from the victory at Manila. No native American could have been more enthusiastic! Once again, events were hunting each other down. With ever greater certainty came the news that an American army ought take possession of the island of Cuba, and - I became very contemplative, without actually knowing why. I got twitchy. How stale and indifferent the inspiring reporter's life suddenly seemed! I became dissatisfied. What did I care about the paper when there was a war! War!! Bloody War! Fight in a tropical country!!!
I saw myself two nights in a row in a troubled dream as a colossally brave officer who led his people to victory in the assault.... And next morning I got this great idea! One had to seize the opportunity! The possibilites of the job had to be used till the very last! I wanted to be a war correspondent - but of course - war correspondet!!!
+++ I hung around the reporters' room till all my colleagues had gone. Barely as the long-legged Ferguson with his stomping feet marched out of the door as the last to leave, I was already rushing to the desk in the corner - "Mac, do you have a moment for me? I'd like to speak about a personal matter..." "Of course, my son," he interrupted me laughing. "All right! How much money do you actually need then?" "It - it is not about money, Mac," I stuttered.
"Well, and what‘s the panic?“ "War - Cuba..." "Cuba, huh? What the hell do you have to do with Cuba?" But I stuck to my guns. "Do you really believe, Mac, that we will be invading Cuba?" He took off his golden glasses and cleaned them thoughtfully.
"Well, I'm not the minister of war!" he commented. "But you can bet your bottom dollar that we'll occupy the island a bit, because it's the big sausage to fight over. By the way, the story will expire in peace and quiet, I imagine. The Spaniards would be fools if they really put up a fight. Well, it can also be different. Above all, however, speak your mind calmly now, my boy! What the devil do you actually want? What have you set your mind on again? ?" "I want to go to Cuba!" "I thought so, sonny!" I knew that I had turned scarlet and realized that I had stuttered clumsily in the excitement, but now it was time to talk, talk, talk ... "Mac - help me, Mac! You don't even realize how much I care!! My father was an officer - and as a boy I always wanted to become an officer and - you might understand me..." Allan McGrady nodded seriously at him.
"Put in a good word for me with the old man, Mr. McGrady! I certainly don't want to make any money on it. Just come with me -" "Phooey, who's gonna put pressure on the price!" "Oh, Mac, you know what I mean." "I know, I know. And now it's trust versus trust, you madman. For twenty years I've been in the newspaper service. According to my best belief, my name is worth something in the newspaper world and with the old man. Now you see: I would give three fingers of my left hand if I could be sent to Cuba by Hearst! Three fingers, my boy! With pleasure!! With delightful pleasure! !" "But -" I stuttered, flabbergasted. "You can do it!" He laughed. "It's nice of you to think I can dare do the impossible. However, with the same chance of success, I could set my mind on wanting to be President of the United States at six o'clock this evening. Man, you have no idea at all what it means to be a war correspondent. Only the best of the best are sent there. People of untiring energy, shining feathers - men who know how to find a way out in every situation - men with first-rate military knowledge - oh, dear God. If there is really some serious fighting down there, then half of the war correspondents are made men for the rest of their lives. The names of the lucky ones - luck is also part of it! - will be almost as famous as those of the victorious generals. Let's get the idea out of our heads, my boy! It comes down to this, for our newspapers, Davis and McCullock, of course, are going to Cuba; Davis, who is a great writer and Hearst's friend, and McCullock, who was with the great Mullah in Sudan! That's not even a question!" That's when Lascelles entered.
"Good morning, Mac!" he exclaimed. "Do you think the devil is finally loose! Washington telegraphed that the National Guard has been mobilised! That means of course that Uncle Sam is marching to Cuba. And I would give three fingers if I stood in McCullock's shoes! !« Mac wink at to me.
As if he wanted to say: "You see! There is another one! One who has already climbed up the rungs of the newspaper ladder and still can't accomplish what you put into your thick skull. You greenhorn ... you! +++ I stole away. I worked miserably badly that day, for my head was rumbling and roaring and hammering: Cuba - Cuba - war... I walked all over San Francisco, which was decorated with flags. Among excited people who spoke of nothing but war and Cuba. The devil - the devil - - And the defiant blind will of the moment rumbled about ever louder in me, as it has rumbled a hundred more times in my later life, sometimes to my good fortune, sometimes to my misfortune. Later, when one has found the real power and captured with retrospective sense of humor, one likes to think of such moments of madness. If they were paid in hellers and pennies in the coin of life and acquired the right to happy memories, reason may also defend itself with theirs: It would have been better if...
So I walked around in the streets.
After a new toy that jumping little devils dangled in front of me and that I wasn't supposed to catch, and maybe that was the only reason it seemed so desirable. The yearning turned into an obsession. It would be extremly wanted.
So the scallywag did some thinking. Was thinking real hard, to see reason. However, every other person would have laughed themselves sick about the rationality of this reflection: It was essentially that I kept thinking the same thing - "But I want to go to Cuba! What the hell, I want to go to Cuba anyway! !" The minor affairs of life to the left and right of Cuba and the mysterious future that lay beyond Cuba bothered me dreadfully little. They were of no importance. First of all I wanted to be part of this campaign, secondly I had to, and thirdly there was now doubt in my mind I would be part of it! I was now fully aware of that and hence the matter seemed to be resolved.
I - really - needed - to go - to Cuba! !
unit 1
Das Kommen des Krieges.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 2
Vorgeschichte des spanisch-amerikanischen Krieges.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 3
– Die Guerillakämpfe zwischen Spaniern und kubanischen Insurgenten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 4
– Die Glückssoldaten der Virginia.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 5
– Gespannte Beziehungen zwischen den Vereinigten Staaten und Spanien.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 6
– Grausamkeiten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 7
– Die kubanische Junta in New York.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 8
– Der Untergang der Maine.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 9
– Der Racheschrei.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 10
– Kriegserklärung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 11
– Meine große Idee!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 12
– Die große Idee funktioniert nicht!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 17
Korruption war überall im Land.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 18
Hungersnot folgte auf Hungersnot.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 19
Bitteres Elend herrschte seit vielen Jahren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 22
Ein spanisches Kanonenboot fing den Schooner ab.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 25
Vergessen aber wurden die Männer der Virginia nie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 28
Der grimmige Soldat ersann das System der Blockhauslinien.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 30
Quer über die ganze Breite der Insel schob sich die trocha.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 31
Eine gewaltige Kriegsmaschine war es: Undurchdringbare Drahtverhaue verbanden die Blockhäuser.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 33
Ein furchtbares Gemetzel begann.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 35
Sie schonten weder Weib noch Kind.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 36
So tobte der Kleinkrieg.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 38
Gefangene wurden von den Spaniern ohne weiteres erschossen: zu Dutzenden, zu Hunderten.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 41
Alles drängte zur Einmischung der Vereinigten Staaten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 43
Die Stimmung war gespannt zum Platzen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 44
Da flog am 15.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 46
Die gesamte Besatzung von über sechshundert Mann ging zugrunde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 47
Jetzt jagten sich die Ereignisse.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 48
Ein Schrei der Entrüstung gellte über Amerika.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 49
Rache für die Maine!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 50
durchbrauste es die Zeitungen: Remember the Maine!
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 51
donnerte es in den Massen meetings.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 54
Scharfer spanischer Protest in unziemlichen Ausdrücken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 55
Kurzer Notenwechsel, der die Lage nur verschärfte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 56
Am 25.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 59
Nach fünf Tagen war die spanische Philippinenflotte in der Seeschlacht von Manila am 1.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 60
Mai 1898 vernichtet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 62
Das Soldatenblut vielleicht auch vom Großvater und Vater her, den alten Offizieren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 64
Kein Stockamerikaner hätte begeisterter sein können!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 65
Wieder jagten sich die Ereignisse.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 67
Ich wurde zappelig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 68
Wie schal und gleichgültig schien auf einmal das begeisternde Reporterleben!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 69
Ich wurde unzufrieden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 70
Was scherte mich die Zeitung, wenn es Krieg gab!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 71
Krieg!!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 72
Blutigen Krieg!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 73
Kämpfe im tropischen Land!!!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 75
Und am nächsten Morgen kam mir die große Idee!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 76
Man mußte die Gelegenheit beim Schopfe packen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 77
Die Möglichkeiten des Berufs mußten ausgenutzt werden bis zum letzten!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 78
Kriegskorrespondent wollte ich sein – aber selbstverständlich – Kriegskorrespondent!!!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 79
+++ Ich drückte mich im Reporterzimmer herum, bis die Kollegen alle fort waren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 82
» Allright!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 83
unit 84
»Nun, und wo brennt es dann?« »Krieg – Kuba...« »Kuba, eh?
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 85
Was in der Hölle haben Sie denn mit Kuba zu tun?« Aber ich ließ nicht locker.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 87
»Nun, ich bin nicht der Kriegsminister!« meinte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 89
Die Geschichte wird übrigens so ziemlich in Ruhe und Frieden ablaufen, denke ich mir.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 90
Die Spanier wären Narren, wollten sie uns ernsthaften Widerstand entgegensetzen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 91
Na, es kann auch anders kommen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 92
Vor allem aber reden Sie jetzt ruhig heraus, lieber Junge!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 93
Was wollen Sie eigentlich, zum Teufel?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 94
Was haben Sie sich da wieder in den Kopf gesetzt?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 96
Sie wissen ja nicht, wieviel mir daran liegt!!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 98
»Legen Sie ein gutes Wort für mich ein beim Alten, Mr. McGrady!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 99
Ich will gewiß kein Geld verdienen dabei.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 101
Und nun Vertrauen gegen Vertrauen, Sie Mann der Tollheiten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 102
Zwanzig Jahre bin ich im Zeitungsdienst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 103
Mein Name ist nach meiner besten Ueberzeugung etwas wert in der Zeitungswelt und beim Alten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 105
Drei Finger, mein Junge!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 106
Mit Vergnügen!!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 107
Mit wonnevoller Wonne!!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 108
!« »Aber –« stotterte ich, aus allen Wolken gefallen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 109
» Sie können das doch erreichen!« Er lachte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 110
»Es ist nett von Ihnen, mir das Unmögliche zuzutrauen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 112
Mann, Sie ahnen nicht, was es bedeutet, Kriegskorrespondent zu sein.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 113
Da schickt man die Auserlesensten der Auserlesenen hin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 116
Die Namen der Glücklichen – Glück gehört auch dazu!
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 117
– werden beinahe so berühmt werden wie diejenigen der siegreichen Generale.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 118
Schlagen wir's uns aus dem Kopf, mein Junge!
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 120
Das ist gar keine Frage!« Da trat Lascelles ein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 121
» Good morning, Mac!« rief er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 122
»Denken Sie mal, der Teufel ist endlich los!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 123
Washington telegraphiert die Mobilmachung der National Guard!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 124
Bedeutet natürlich, daß Onkel Sam nach Kuba marschiert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 125
Und ich würde drei Finger drum geben, stände ich in McCullocks Schuhen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 126
!« Mac blinzelte mir zu.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 127
Als wolle er sagen: »Siehst du!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 128
Da ist noch einer!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 130
Du blutiger Anfänger ...
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 131
du!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 132
!« +++ Ich schlich mich fort.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 134
Unter aufgeregten Menschen, die von nichts sprachen als vom Krieg und von Kuba.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 138
So lief ich umher in den Straßen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 140
Die Sehnsucht gestaltete sich zur fixen Idee.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 141
Sie wurde zum harten Wollen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 142
Der Lausbub dachte also nach.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 143
Dachte angestrengt nach, vernünftig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 145
Zum Teufel, ich will aber doch nach Kuba!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 147
Sie waren nebensächlich.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 149
Darüber war ich mir nun klar, und damit schien mir die Angelegenheit erledigt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 150
Ich – mußte – unbedingt – nach – Kuba!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 151
!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 128  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 88  2 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 108  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 128  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 142  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 140  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 151  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 • 1774  commented on  unit 151  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 96  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  translated  unit 151  2 months, 3 weeks ago
"!"
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 113  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 107  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 97  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 95  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 77  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 74  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 8  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 147  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  translated  unit 131  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 86  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 54  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 79  2 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 76  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 121  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 112  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 106  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 105  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 74  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 89  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 82  2 months, 4 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 82  2 months, 4 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 74  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 90  2 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 71  2 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 56  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 23  2 months, 4 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 19  2 months, 4 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 8  2 months, 4 weeks ago

Das Kommen des Krieges.

Vorgeschichte des spanisch-amerikanischen Krieges. – Die Guerillakämpfe zwischen Spaniern und kubanischen Insurgenten. – Die Glückssoldaten der Virginia. – Gespannte Beziehungen zwischen den Vereinigten Staaten und Spanien. – Grausamkeiten. – Die kubanische Junta in New York. – Der Untergang der Maine. – Der Racheschrei. – Kriegserklärung. – Meine große Idee! – Die große Idee funktioniert nicht! – Aber ich muß unbedingt nach Kuba ...

Schweres Kriegsgewölk überschattete im Jahre 1898 die Neue Welt. Unten im Süden auf der Insel Kuba tobte seit Jahren ein Kleinkrieg zwischen Herren und Knechten, zwischen einer Rasse, die sich im Niedergange befand, und bösem Mischblut; zwischen Spaniern und Kubanern. Die reiche Insel, das Tabaksland, das Zuckerland war bitterarm geworden unter spanischer Mißwirtschaft, und unerträglicher Steuerdruck lastete auf ihm. Die spanisch-indianischen Mischlinge, die westindischen Neger und Halbneger, nie Freunde harter Arbeit, wurden durch das unfähige spanische Beamtentum mit seinem die Hände in den Schoß legenden mañana-Glauben noch gründlicher verdorben, als sie von Mutter Natur aus schon waren. Korruption war überall im Land. Hungersnot folgte auf Hungersnot. Bitteres Elend herrschte seit vielen Jahren. Da schlugen sich die Mischlinge in die Büsche, und langsam wuchs unter Führung von Abenteurern die national-kubanische Erhebung; ein Guerillakrieg, der von beiden Seiten mit einer Wildheit und einer Grausamkeit geführt wurde, die dem benachbarten Amerika den Atem stocken ließ und ihm eine altschmerzende Episode ins Gedächtnis rief, die in den Vereinigten Staaten böses Blut gemacht hatte: Das Sterben der Männer der Virginia.
Vor einem Jahrzehnt, denn solange schon wütete der Kleinkrieg zwischen Spaniern und Insurgenten, waren amerikanische Glückssoldaten in dem Schooner Virginia gen Kuba gesegelt und im Süden gelandet, sich in den Reihen der Revolutionäre Ruhm und Glück zu erkämpfen. Ein spanisches Kanonenboot fing den Schooner ab. Vierundzwanzig Stunden später knallten die Schüsse der spanischen Pelotons, und die Glückssoldaten der Virginia waren tot. Amerika zitterte vor Entrüstung, wenn auch das amtliche Washington sich wohl oder übel auf den Boden des internationalen Rechts stellen und erklären mußte, jene amerikanischen Abenteurer hätten den Schutz des Mutterlandes verwirkt, als sie sich auf ihre ungesetzliche Unternehmung einließen. Vergessen aber wurden die Männer der Virginia nie.
Schon zu Ende des Jahres 1897 waren die Beziehungen zwischen den Vereinigten Staaten und Spanien gespannt, denn Washington hatte wiederholt energisch darauf hingewiesen, daß in der Tabak- und Zuckerindustrie Kubas Millionen amerikanischen Geldes steckten und die unhaltbaren Zustände auf der Insel den wirtschaftlichen Interessen der Vereinigten Staaten schadeten. Da wurde der spanische General Weyler als Generalkapitän auf die Insel gesandt, und der Kampf gegen die Insurgenten begann im großen Stil. Der grimmige Soldat ersann das System der Blockhauslinien. In Fächerform wurden von den militärisch stark besetzten Zentren aus kleine Blockhäuser in das Innere des Landes vorgeschoben, um in stetig fortschreitender, geschützter Angriffslinie die Revolutionäre zusammenzudrängen und das Land Meile für Meile von ihnen zu säubern. Quer über die ganze Breite der Insel schob sich die trocha. Eine gewaltige Kriegsmaschine war es: Undurchdringbare Drahtverhaue verbanden die Blockhäuser. Vor diesem Gürtel kleiner Festungen lief eine zweite Linie von Wolfsgruben und Sprengminen, die eine bloße Annäherung an die trocha schon zu einem tödlichen Wagnis machten.
Ein furchtbares Gemetzel begann. Tier kämpfte gegen Tier, denn die halbverhungerten, verzweifelten, geächteten Menschen in den Wäldern waren zu Tieren geworden, die mit ihren Macheten jeden der verhaßten spanischen Soldaten, der ihnen in die Hände fiel, grausam abschlachteten, und die erbitterten Spanier zeigten sich nicht weniger grausam als jene. Sie schonten weder Weib noch Kind. So tobte der Kleinkrieg. Immer wieder wurden die trocha da und dort in Kämpfen bis aufs Messer von den Insurgenten durchbrochen; hatten doch diese menschlichen Gerippe, die wenig mehr besaßen als ihre Waffen, nichts zu verlieren und alles zu hoffen. Gefangene wurden von den Spaniern ohne weiteres erschossen: zu Dutzenden, zu Hunderten. In New York aber sorgte eine kubanische Junta, eine Vertretung der Insurgenten, getreulich dafür, daß die amerikanische öffentliche Meinung in Schrift und Bild jede Greueltat der spanischen Soldaten erfuhr, während über die Schandtaten der Revolutionäre klüglich geschwiegen wurde. Grelle Schilderungen von Hunger, Jammer, und brutaler Unterdrückung aber verfehlen ihre Wirkung auf den Amerikaner nie.
Alles drängte zur Einmischung der Vereinigten Staaten. Der langsam erwachende Imperialismus, der eine Ausdehnung der amerikanischen Macht forderte und Taten verlangte; das Kapital und starke wirtschaftliche Interessen, die nicht nur ihre Geldanlagen auf der Nachbarinsel retten wollten, sondern auch von einem amerikanischen Kuba sich goldene Berge versprachen; der Zug der öffentlichen Meinung endlich, die die blutigen Greuel im Nachbarhause nicht mehr mit ansehen mochte.
Die Stimmung war gespannt zum Platzen.
Da flog am 15. Februar des Jahres 1898 abends 9 Uhr im Hafen von Havana der große amerikanische Kreuzer Maine in die Luft und sank augenblicklich. Die gesamte Besatzung von über sechshundert Mann ging zugrunde.
Jetzt jagten sich die Ereignisse.
Ein Schrei der Entrüstung gellte über Amerika. Rache für die Maine! durchbrauste es die Zeitungen: Remember the Maine! donnerte es in den Massen meetings. Denn für jeden Amerikaner war es selbstverständlich, daß ein heimtückischer spanischer Torpedo die Maine und ihre 600 Amerikaner in die Luft gesprengt hatte.
Die kubanischen Insurgenten wurden von der Regierung der Vereinigten Staaten als kriegführende Partei anerkannt. Scharfer spanischer Protest in unziemlichen Ausdrücken. Kurzer Notenwechsel, der die Lage nur verschärfte. Am 25. April erklärte das amerikanische Repräsentantenhaus, der Senat und der Kongreß, den Kriegszustand mit dem Königreich Spanien.
Am selben Tage noch erhielt das amerikanische Geschwader in Ostasien unter Admiral Dewey telegraphische Instruktionen. Nach fünf Tagen war die spanische Philippinenflotte in der Seeschlacht von Manila am 1. Mai 1898 vernichtet.
+++
Der Lausbub wäre nicht das Menschenkind voller Unrast und tiefgewurzeltem Drängen nach grellem Erleben gewesen, hätte sich nicht inmitten des Kriegslärms sein abenteuerliches Blut geregt. Das Soldatenblut vielleicht auch vom Großvater und Vater her, den alten Offizieren.
Ich verschlang die sich jagenden Nachrichten und brüllte mit in Jubel und Freude, als Lascelles mit der Depesche vom Siege bei Manila ins Reporterzimmer stürzte. Kein Stockamerikaner hätte begeisterter sein können! Wieder jagten sich die Ereignisse. Mit immer größerer Bestimmtheit trat die Nachricht auf, daß eine amerikanische Armee von der Insel Kuba Besitz ergreifen sollte und – ich wurde sehr nachdenklich, ohne eigentlich zu Wissen warum. Ich wurde zappelig. Wie schal und gleichgültig schien auf einmal das begeisternde Reporterleben! Ich wurde unzufrieden. Was scherte mich die Zeitung, wenn es Krieg gab! Krieg!! Blutigen Krieg! Kämpfe im tropischen Land!!!
Ich sah mich zwei Nächte hintereinander im unruhigen Traum als kolossal tapferen Offizier, der seine Leute im Sturm zum Siege führte ... Und am nächsten Morgen kam mir die große Idee! Man mußte die Gelegenheit beim Schopfe packen! Die Möglichkeiten des Berufs mußten ausgenutzt werden bis zum letzten! Kriegskorrespondent wollte ich sein – aber selbstverständlich – Kriegskorrespondent!!!
+++
Ich drückte mich im Reporterzimmer herum, bis die Kollegen alle fort waren. Kaum war der langbeinige Ferguson mit seinen polternden Schritten als letzter aus der Türe gestiefelt, als ich schon auf den Schreibtisch in der Ecke zuschoß –
»Mac, haben Sie einen Augenblick Zeit für mich? Ich möchte gern in einer persönlichen Angelegenheit ...«
»Natürlich, mein Sohn,« unterbrach er mich lachend. » Allright! Wieviel brauchen Sie denn nun eigentlich?«
»Es – es handelt sich nicht um Geld, Mac.« stotterte ich.
»Nun, und wo brennt es dann?«
»Krieg – Kuba...«
»Kuba, eh? Was in der Hölle haben Sie denn mit Kuba zu tun?«
Aber ich ließ nicht locker. »Glauben Sie wirklich, Mac, daß wir in Kuba einfallen werden?«
Er nahm seine goldene Brille ab und putzte sie bedächtig.
»Nun, ich bin nicht der Kriegsminister!« meinte er. »Aber Sie können immerhin Ihren letzten Stiefel darauf verwetten, daß die Insel ein bißchen besetzt wird von uns, denn sie ist die große Wurst, um die man sich zankt. Die Geschichte wird übrigens so ziemlich in Ruhe und Frieden ablaufen, denke ich mir. Die Spanier wären Narren, wollten sie uns ernsthaften Widerstand entgegensetzen. Na, es kann auch anders kommen. Vor allem aber reden Sie jetzt ruhig heraus, lieber Junge! Was wollen Sie eigentlich, zum Teufel? Was haben Sie sich da wieder in den Kopf gesetzt??«
»Ich will nach Kuba!«
»Dachte ich mir, sonny!«
Ich wußte, daß ich puterrot geworden war und merkte, daß ich ungeschickt stotterte in der Aufregung, aber jetzt hieß es reden, reden, reden ... »Mac – helfen Sie mir, Mac! Sie wissen ja nicht, wieviel mir daran liegt!! Mein Vater war Offizier – und ich wollte als Junge immer schon Offizier werden und – Sie verstehen mich vielleicht ...«
Allan McGrady nickte ernsthaft vor sich hin.
»Legen Sie ein gutes Wort für mich ein beim Alten, Mr. McGrady! Ich will gewiß kein Geld verdienen dabei. Nur mitkommen –«
»Pfui, wer wird auf die Preise drücken!« »Oh, Mac, Sie wissen doch, wie ich es meine.«
»Ich weiß, ich weiß. Und nun Vertrauen gegen Vertrauen, Sie Mann der Tollheiten. Zwanzig Jahre bin ich im Zeitungsdienst. Mein Name ist nach meiner besten Ueberzeugung etwas wert in der Zeitungswelt und beim Alten. Nun sehen Sie: Ich würde drei Finger meiner linken Hand hergeben, wenn ich damit erreichen könnte, von Hearst nach Kuba geschickt zu werden! Drei Finger, mein Junge! Mit Vergnügen!! Mit wonnevoller Wonne!!!«
»Aber –« stotterte ich, aus allen Wolken gefallen. » Sie können das doch erreichen!«
Er lachte. »Es ist nett von Ihnen, mir das Unmögliche zuzutrauen. Ich könnte mir jedoch mit der gleichen Aussicht auf Erfolg es in den Kopf setzen, heute abend um sechs Uhr Präsident der Vereinigten Staaten sein zu wollen. Mann, Sie ahnen nicht, was es bedeutet, Kriegskorrespondent zu sein. Da schickt man die Auserlesensten der Auserlesenen hin. Leute von unermüdlicher Tatkraft, glänzende Federn – Männer, die in jeder Lage einen Ausweg zu finden wissen – Männer mit militärischen Kenntnissen ersten Ranges – ach du lieber Gott. Gibt es da unten wirklich ernsthafte Kämpfe, so sind die Hälfte der Kriegskorrespondenten für den Rest ihres Lebens gemachte Männer. Die Namen der Glücklichen – Glück gehört auch dazu! – werden beinahe so berühmt werden wie diejenigen der siegreichen Generale. Schlagen wir's uns aus dem Kopf, mein Junge! Für unsere Zeitungen gehen selbstverständlich Davis und McCullock nach Kuba, kommt es so weit; Davis, der ein großer Schriftsteller und Hearsts Freund ist, und McCullock, der beim tollen Mullah im Sudan war! Das ist gar keine Frage!«
Da trat Lascelles ein.
» Good morning, Mac!« rief er. »Denken Sie mal, der Teufel ist endlich los! Washington telegraphiert die Mobilmachung der National Guard! Bedeutet natürlich, daß Onkel Sam nach Kuba marschiert. Und ich würde drei Finger drum geben, stände ich in McCullocks Schuhen!!« Mac blinzelte mir zu.
Als wolle er sagen: »Siehst du! Da ist noch einer! Einer, der schon hoch geklettert ist auf den Sprossen der Zeitungsleiter und trotzdem das nicht erreichen kann, was du dir in den dicken Schädel gesetzt hast. Du blutiger Anfänger ... du!!«
+++
Ich schlich mich fort. Miserabel schlecht arbeitete ich an jenem Tag, denn in meinem Kopf rumorte und lärmte und hämmerte es: Kuba – Kuba – Krieg...
Kreuz und quer lief ich durch das flaggengeschmückte San Franzisko. Unter aufgeregten Menschen, die von nichts sprachen als vom Krieg und von Kuba. Teufel – Teufel – – Und immer lauter rumorte in mir das trotzige blinde Wollen des Augenblicks, wie es noch hundert Male rumort hat in meinem späteren Leben, zum Glück manchmal, manchmal zu meinem Unglück. Später, wenn man die wirkliche Kraft gefunden und sich rückschauenden Humor eingefangen hat, denkt man gern an solche Augenblicke der Tollheit. Hat man sie doch auf Heller und Pfennig bezahlt in der Münze des Lebens und das Recht auf fröhliche Erinnerung erworben, mag auch die Vernunft sich wehren mit ihrem: Es wäre doch besser gewesen, wenn...
So lief ich umher in den Straßen.
Einem neuen Spielzeug nach, das hüpfende Teufelchen vor mir baumeln ließen und das ich nicht erhaschen sollte und das vielleicht nur deshalb so begehrenswert schien. Die Sehnsucht gestaltete sich zur fixen Idee. Sie wurde zum harten Wollen.
Der Lausbub dachte also nach. Dachte angestrengt nach, vernünftig. Ueber die Vernünftigkeit dieses Nachdenkens aber würde jeder andere Mensch sich krankgelacht haben: Es bestand im Wesentlichen darin, daß ich fortwährend dasselbe dachte – »Ich will aber nach Kuba! Zum Teufel, ich will aber doch nach Kuba!!«
Die kleinen Affären des Lebens, die links und rechts neben Kuba, und die schleierhafte Zukunft, die hinter Kuba lag, kümmerten mich furchtbar wenig. Sie waren nebensächlich. Erstens wollte ich mit in diesen Feldzug, und zweitens mußte ich mit, und drittens ging ich überhaupt auf jeden Fall mit! Darüber war ich mir nun klar, und damit schien mir die Angelegenheit erledigt.
Ich – mußte – unbedingt – nach – Kuba!!