de-en  Rede von Außenminister Heiko Maas am National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in Tokyo, Japan
July 25th, 2018 - Speech - Dear Professor Tanaka, Dear Mr. Saaler, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen, Dear Friends, First of all many thanks for the very friendly welcome and many thanks also to our co-host, the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung!

" 'Somebody has 'Grips' []brains]', that is what people in Germany say about a person who has acuteness of mind and acts wisely. In this respect, the name of the GRIPS is also program.

For more than two decades now, students from more than 60 countries have been prepared to find clever solutions to international problems. I would like to mention, the times make obvious that this task is getting more and more demanding. That's why I am especially happy that I am allowed to be here today; but before I talk about German-Japanese relations and, above all, about the challenges we face together in Asia and Europe, I would like to express once again my condolences to the Japanese government and also to the Japanese people, as I have just made clear in my talks with the Foreign Minister. Many people in Germany have observed and been deeply affected by the floods in the west of the country.

And therefore our thoughts are with the victims and the relatives. Many thanks and, above all, respect goes to all the helpers who helped with this terrible event.

This misfortune has just reminded us of how Japanese volunteers helped us Germans when the 100-year flood in 2013 flooded places in the east and south of our country. That was a gesture, we and quite a lot of people in Germany haven't forgotten until today.

It is indeed all the more gratifying to see that some Germans were able to reciprocate this spirit of co-operation by helping in the cleanup work near Hiroshima, removing debris and mud and supporting the Japanese helpers to the best of their ability.

In Japanese and German there is a very similar saying for that. It reads, "You recognize the true friend in distress." Japan and Germany are true friends.

It is therefore no coincidence that my first trip to Asia as foreign minister leads me first and foremost to Japan.

Our countries are connected by much more than the geographical distance would suggest. I am not only talking about the cliché that many people have in mind that Japaneses and Germans are always diligent, tidy and punctual.

In the trendy districts of Berlin, Düsseldorf or Frankfurt, Ramen is now one of the staple foods. Young people in Germany love manga, anime, cosplay. Books by Haruki Murakami are consistently on top of our bestseller lists in Germany. And, I think that 740 University co-operations are an expression of a singularly networked landscape of science.

So, I can only encourage you: use these partnerships, also come to Germany. You are very welcome there. And study our country and get acquainted with the people there. To paraphrase the proverb common throughout East Asia: "Seeing once is better than hearing a hundred times." For us Germans, Japan epitomizes like hardly any other country the fascinating mixture of true to tradition and rapid technological progress

I have just come from a visit to the Zōjō-ji-Temple. Behind it, the Tokyo Tower juts into the sky and around it pulsates the energy of this megacity, which in its extent is still barely tangible for a European.

The contrasts, the dynamic of this city which captivates your imagination after only a few hours, and that's the same for many of my fellow Germans und also many in Europe beyond Germany. The French ethnologist Claude Lévi-Strauss, a great connoisseur of your country, once called Japan "the example of a humane modernism" because of this harmonious combination of contrasts. I think, that's a very appropriate description.

Ever since the World Cup, our admiration for Japan also includes its sporting achievements, even though we have to confess that this carries a sad note.

The Japanese team has inspired people all over the world by the way they have performed there and by the fighting spirit up to the last minute. And after the shock of being eliminated at an early stage, many people in Germany crossed their fingers for the Japaneses - and not just because seven of Japan's national players play in the German Bundesliga. No, thanks to Yuya Osako, we even learned a new word: 半 端 な い! (Note: hampanai has been the Japanese trend word since the World Cup. It is being associated with the player Osako. Meaning: unbelievable, great, awesome!)

As interesting as football may be - that is not the reason why I came here. At the moment, the discussion about football in Germany is indeed a political discussion, which I do not want to elaborate on much at this point. In addition, with Lukas Podolski we have an extraordinary prominent football ambassador here in Japan.

Today I would like to talk about the tremendous upheavals we are experiencing in the world right now and which challenge Japan and Germany in a very similar way.

In Europe, but of course much more here in Japan the North Korean missile and nuclear tests of the last two years, for example, have aroused great concern. And most recently in Europe, the fighting in Eastern Ukraine and the flow of refugees from Syria and Iraq have shown us that we are definitely not living on an 'island of bliss'.

This is reinforced now by the uncertainty about the course of the United States under President Trump, who meanwhile, by a 280-character tweet, calls into question alliances that have been growing for decades. Russia has openly challenged the world order by its annexation of the Crimea contrary to international law and its behaviour in the Syria conflict, too..

China wants to shift the geopolitical balance of power in its favour and demands something from many in the neighbourhood that I would call followers.

In this global political situation, I think, we need a German- Japanese soludarity, because it is also a solidarity of values. Our countries are too small to set the tone in the power concert of the world powers alone. Therefore we must also think about new ways in these times.

It will remain so that individually it remains difficult for each of us, to be a 'rule maker' in a multipolar world. But that doesn't mean that we have to accept the role of 'rule taker'!

If we combine our strengths, what we can do even more than we did in the past, together we might become something like a 'rule shaper' - designers and engines of an international order the world desperately needs.

Today here in Tokyo we made a step in this direction: Foreign Minister Kōno and me just now have agreed, to fine-tune even more closely and more frequently in the future. Moreover we launched an even closer cooperation of our diplomats, secretaries of state, department heads up to the planning staffs and written and signed a joint statement thereto.

We want to develop a common view on regional and global problems and then seek and tackle solutions together. Thereby we count on shared values and on the historically grown affinity of our societies.

There are hardly two countries, so far away from each other like Japan and Germany, whose history has developed so similarly in the past 150 years. In fact with all heights and depths.

Analogical to the industrialisation in Germany there was a development in Japan at the end of the 19th century, that almosty catapulted this country into the circle of the leading industrial nations. One here can be quite proud of this intellectual and political feat.

We Germans are also a little proud of the fact that German scientists and also statesmen and stateswomen have helped us take a similar development. So, and I also say this as a former Minister of Justice, that, for example, it is still a special circumstance for us that the Japanese legal system to this day closely follows the German one.

Both countries experienced the Second World War as a life-threatening catastrophe – for us in Germany this was accompanied by a declaration of moral bankruptcy.

This was followed by – thanks to the extended hands of the victorious Western powers – a truly meteoric economic ascent. And the enduring turning of our countries to freedom, democracy and the rule of law has also not been a foregone conclusion, but it is the foundation on which our partnership values are based today.

One pillar of this partnership is free world trade. Japan and Europe benefit equally of it. For this reason, the new protectionism, which unfortunately is so much talked about on the international stage, and the "America First" policy behind it all challenge us together.

The correct answer is also provided by the free trade agreement signed last week between the European Union and Japan. For me this is a milestone. Because in the end not just a much closer agreement and a lot more opportunities emerge, this creates most of all the largest free trade zone in the world.

We influence standards for world trade: for example, in the environment and on climate issues, in the protection of consumers, the observance of social standards or even in competition law.

And I hope that we also come to an agreement soon in the current negotiations on better investment protection and then can set further new standards there as well.

That's what I understand by "rule shaper" to be very practical!

But perhaps even more important is the signal to the east and west: free trade is not a zero-sum game for us. The trade with reliable rules ultimately creates prosperity for all.

Not only the USA define free trade at the moment in any case somehow different. In China, too, our companies are repeatedly faced with barriers to market access.

Many complain about inadequate protection of intellectual property or forced technology transfer. I hope, therefore, that Japan and Europe will continue to work together against such trade practices and develop strategies and concepts. At this point we also share many interests with the United States. It is therefore still important to rely on trilateral cooperation between Japan, the EU and the USA wherever possible in order to strengthen the international trading system and also, especially in the current discussion, to keep the USA on-board.

Fair trade requires strong institutions at all levels, above all certainly the World Trade Organisation. In order to preserve the WTO, some modernisation is also necessary there.

I am thinking, for example, of modern rules for digital commerce or for dealing with state-owned companies. Japan and Germany, which have already given this a considerable amount of thought, can also act together as pioneers in this area.

Germany and Japan can and should also work much more closely together in dealing with artificial intelligence or the digitization of our working and living environment.

Whether in Berlin or Tokyo - people are asking similar questions in all sectors.

Is my job still secure in times of digitalization?

Will artificial intelligence eventually outpace the human mind?

What are the advantages of greater networking and where are its risks?

And we in Germany often ask ourselves why, when something new is involved, is the discussion about the risks almost always put into the foreground before even properly evaluating what the actual benefit is and where such developments can help us and everyone, not just a few.

And that is also why a focus of the journey here is to search, together with German and Japanese experts, for answers to these very questions.

As much as we are impressed by Asia's economic dynamism and as important as free world trade is - our view of Asia must not be limited to economic interests alone. I say this absolutely self-critically, also with a view to the European policy on Asia of last several decades.

On no other continent are the global challenges concentrated as much as is the case in Asia.

Territorial conflicts such as in the South China Sea, the situation in the East China Sea or the nuclear armament of North Korea jeopardize the entire international order. If we allow the intimidation of neighboring countries or the breach of international rules of law to be tacitly accepted, then the regulation at stake is actually already lost.

Tomorrow we will have talks with the Korean government in Seoul. We also share with our partner Korea, the commitment to free trade and a rule-based world.

North Korea's nuclear aspirations have been fundamentally challenging this world order for a some time now. The maintenance of the nuclear order is not a regional issue, but a question of survival for all of humanity.

President Trump's meeting with Kim Jong Un in Singapore was a first and, indeed, I would say a right step away from the escalation of last year. But of course further steps must follow towards a complete, irreversible and verifiable denuclearization of North Korea - we agreed on this in our talks here in Tokyo today.

Only when North Korea visibly returns to the basis of international law, will discussions, talks and considerations about easing sanctions come into consideration in the first place. If this were to be done differently, those who have broken international law countless times would be prematurely rewarded and thus in this way would have acquired nuclear weapons in the first place. That would be a fatal signal, especially beyond East Asia.

We are ready, within the scope of our means, to contribute to the search for a solution. We have gathered expertise, for example in the difficult nuclear negotiations with Iran in recent years.

Here, too, it was essentially a question of preventing nuclear armament by means of a globally unique regime of transparency. And by the way, our adherence to the agreement with Iran is also a signal to North Korea and other states that it is worth giving up the pursuit of nuclear weapons.

Because ultimately, every international system of order is primarily based on trust. And trust can only be built if contracts are fulfilled and a word given today is not revoked tomorrow.

I am firmly convinced that Germany and Japan stand for this kind of reliability. Our approaches are similar: in the United Nations, the G7 and the G20 we are consistently committed to a future for the multilateral world order.

We think of political solutions and civil crisis management together and they are always at the forefront of our conflict management.

We continue to advertise arms control, which is another topic of our discussions today.

And perhaps it is also the German-Japanese appreciation of clear rules that repeatedly leads us to advocate that disputes must be resolved on the basis of international law. Not everyone sees it that way today. This applies to the conflict in Ukraine as well as to the recognition of international arbitration awards, for example in the South China Sea.

I am pleased, as we have also said today, that Japan, as chair of the G20, also intends to set such foreign policy issues on the agenda next year.

When Germany moves into the United Nations Security Council for two years at the beginning of 2019, we will therefore also coordinate closely with Japan on foreign and security policy issues. Because, and I want to say this very deliberately here in Tokyo, for us, Japan belongs on a UN Security Council that will change the world order of the 21st century. Together with Brazil and India, we, as the G4, continue to work for such a modern Security Council.

There are many genuine success stories of German-Japanese co-operation and we want to build on these. Some of them need to be recalled.

In Afghanistan we have accumulated shared experiences in the rebuilding of that country. This can be used as a basis for stabilising other crisis areas.

In Syria and the neighbouring countries, Japan and Germany are making decisive contribution through their humanitarian aid to alleviate the misery of the people in the war zone and the suffering of the refugees, at least to some extent. Continuation of this is more important than ever, especially when other donors are reducing their support, as is, unfortunately, also the case at present. And in Africa, Germany and Japan have assumed significantly more responsibility for stability and security in recent years. We want to resolutely continue on this path that has also occupied us today. Regrettably, there is also a great need for this in Africa.

Germany and Japan can become core of an alliance of multilateralists.

An alliance of countries that will jointly defend and also develop existing regulations, there, where it is necessary.

Showing solidarity, if international law is trampled on each other's doorstep.

which fill the gaps that are and have been also created by the withdrawal of others from large parts of the world stage.

who stand up for climate protection and which was one of the greatest challenges facing humanity.

who assume joint responsibility in international organizations - financially, but not only financially, but also and especially politically.

We need such an alliance, particularly in Asia, which is already closely interwoven economically, but is often divided by political differences. An alliance of multilateralists would also provide support for all the countries in the region, which may find it even more difficult than Germany or Japan to actually have their concerns heard.

I am thinking, for example, of the Pacific island states. Free world trade, open sea routes and the fight against climate change also pertain to them - and often in a very existential way. And when you talk to the representatives of these countries, they explain very impressively what the nexus between climate change and security is, there, where they live.

That is why, ladies and gentlemen, Germany and Japan agree on many issues and their strategic direction is also very cooperative. That's why we wanted to make it clear once again with our visit here in Tokyo that we are ready to be a partner for our Japanese friends. It's a good thing that the same is true on the Japanese side.

ありがとうございます Thank you again for making it possible to combine our visit here today and our political talks with an event like this. For I am firmly convinced that in politics there is too often a mistake which is regrettably made everywhere: That responsible politicians, even if they share the same opinion, unfortunately often only talk to each other. Once you have managed to reach a political agreement with friends, launch a project or pursue a strategy, a very significant part of political work as I understand it, is to immediately make sure of one thing: and that is, at least a minimum acceptance of that which you are advocating in the society in which you live. And maybe today with this event we could contribute to it.

Thank you very much, I am looking forward to the discussion.
unit 3
Insofern ist der Name des GRIPS auch Programm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 5
Ich würde mal sagen, die Zeiten machen uns deutlich, dass diese Aufgabe immer anspruchsvoller wird.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 8
Und deshalb sind unsere Gedanken bei den Opfern und bei den Angehörigen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 11
unit 13
Auf Japanisch und auf Deutsch gibt es dafür ein sehr ähnliches Sprichwort.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 14
Es lautet: „Den wahren Freund erkennst Du in der Not.“ Japan und Deutschland sind wahre Freunde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 16
Unsere Länder verbindet viel mehr, als die geographische Entfernung es vermuten ließe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 19
Junge Leute in Deutschland lieben Manga, Anime, Cosplay.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 20
unit 24
Ich komme gerade von einem Besuch im Zōjō-ji -Tempel.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 28
Ich finde, das ist eine sehr treffende Beschreibung.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 32
Nein, auch dank Yuya Osako haben wir sogar ein neues Wort gelernt: 半端ない!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 33
(Anmerkung: hampanai ist seit der WM das japanische Trendwort.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 34
Es wird mit dem Spieler Osako in Verbindung gebracht wird.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 35
Bedeutung: unglaublich, großartig, krass!)
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 36
So interessant auch Fußball sein mag – das ist nicht der Grund, weshalb ich hierhergekommen bin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 40
In Europa, aber natürlich noch viel mehr hier in Japan, haben z.B.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 41
die nordkoreanischen Raketen- und Atomtests der beiden letzten Jahre große Sorge ausgelöst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 47
Unsere Länder sind zu klein, um allein jeweils im Machtkonzert der Weltmächte den Ton anzugeben.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 48
Deshalb müssen wir uns in diesen Zeiten auch über neue Wege Gedanken machen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 50
Aber das heißt nicht, dass wir uns mit der Rolle des „rule taker“ abfinden wollen!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 57
Und zwar mit allen Höhen und auch Tiefen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 58
Ähnlich wie die Industrialisierung in Deutschland hat es in Japan Ende des 19.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 60
Auf diese intellektuelle und politische Meisterleistung kann man hier durchaus stolz sein.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 66
Eine Säule dieser Partnerschaft ist der freie Welthandel.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 67
Japan und Europa profitieren gleichermaßen davon.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 70
Für mich ein Meilenstein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 74
Das ist es, was ich unter „rule shaper“ dann auch ganz praktisch verstehe!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 76
Handel mit verlässlichen Regeln schafft letztlich Wohlstand für alle.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 77
Nicht nur die USA definieren freien Handel zur Zeit auf jeden Fall irgendwie anders.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 78
Auch in China stehen unsere Unternehmen immer wieder vor Hürden beim Marktzugang.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 79
Viele klagen über mangelhaften Schutz geistigen Eigentums oder erzwungenen Technologietransfer.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 81
An der Stelle teilen wir auch viele Interessen mit den Vereinigten Staaten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 84
Um die WTO zu bewahren, muss auch dort Einiges modernisiert werden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 88
Ob in Berlin oder in Tokio – die Menschen stellen doch ähnliche Fragen in allen Bereichen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 89
Ist mein Job noch sicher in Zeiten der Digitalisierung?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 90
Überholt künstliche Intelligenz irgendwann den menschlichen Verstand?
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 91
Welche Vorteile bringt größere Vernetzung und wo liegen ihre Risiken?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 99
Morgen werden wir Gespräche mit der koreanischen Regierung in Seoul führen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 100
unit 101
Nordkoreas Nuklearstreben fordert diese Weltordnung schon seit einiger Zeit fundamental heraus.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 107
Das wäre ein fatales Signal, vor allen Dingen auch über Ostasien hinaus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 108
unit 112
unit 114
unit 117
unit 119
Das sieht ja heute auch nicht mehr jeder so.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 124
Jahrhunderts widerspiegelt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 126
unit 127
Manche muss man auch noch mal in Erinnerung rufen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 128
In Afghanistan haben wir gemeinsam Erfahrungen gesammelt beim Wiederaufbau dieses Landes.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 129
Darauf lässt sich aufbauen, wenn es darum geht, andere Krisengebiete zu stabilisieren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 132
Diesen Weg wollen wir, auch das hat uns heute beschäftigt, ganz entschlossen weitergehen.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 133
Bedauerlicherweise gibt es dafür in Afrika auch eine große Notwendigkeit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 134
Deutschland und Japan können zum Kern einer Allianz der Multilateralisten werden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 142
Ich denke etwa an die Inselstaaten des Pazifik.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 147
Dabei ist es gut, dass einem auf der japanischen Seite das Gleiche entgegenkommt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 151
Und vielleicht konnten wir heute mit dieser Veranstaltung dazu beitragen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 152
Herzlichen Dank, ich freue mich auf die Diskussion.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 131  3 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 150  3 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 37  3 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 144  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 131  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 126  3 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 119  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 113  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 111  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 79  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 78  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 98  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 5  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 1  3 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 36  3 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 35  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 25  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 141  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 138  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 127  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 103  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 99  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 101  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 100  3 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 113  3 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 75  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Maria-Helene • 2282  commented on  unit 55  3 months, 3 weeks ago
kardaMom • 0  commented on  unit 102  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 31  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 67  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 63  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 6  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 26  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 27  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 29  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 31  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 28  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 7  3 months, 3 weeks ago

25.07.2018 - Rede

Sehr geehrter Herr Professor Tanaka, sehr geehrter Herr Saaler, Exzellenzen, sehr geehrte Damen und Herren, liebe Freundinnen und Freunde,
zunächst einmal vielen Dank für die sehr freundliche Begrüßung und einen Dank auch an unseren Mitgastgeber, die Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung!

„Jemand hat Grips“, das sagt man in Deutschland über einen Menschen, der einen wachen Verstand hat, der klug handelt. Insofern ist der Name des GRIPS auch Programm.

Seit über zwei Jahrzehnten werden hier Studierende aus über 60 Ländern darauf vorbereitet, kluge Lösungen auf internationale Probleme zu finden. Ich würde mal sagen, die Zeiten machen uns deutlich, dass diese Aufgabe immer anspruchsvoller wird. Deshalb freue ich mich auch ganz besonders heute hier sein zu dürfen

Bevor ich aber etwas zu den deutsch-japanischen Beziehungen und vor allen Dingen auch zu den Herausforderungen, vor denen wir gemeinsam in Asien und Europa stehen, sagen will, möchte ich, und das habe ich eben in meinen Gesprächen mit dem Außenminister schon deutlich gemacht, der japanischen Regierung und auch dem japanischen Volk noch einmal mein Mitgefühl aussprechen. Die Überflutungen im Westen des Landes haben viele Menschen in Deutschland mitverfolgt und tief getroffen.

Und deshalb sind unsere Gedanken bei den Opfern und bei den Angehörigen. Großer Dank und vor allen Dingen auch Respekt geht an alle Helferinnen und Helfer, die bei diesem schlimmen Ereignis geholfen haben.

Dieses Unglück hat gerade uns auch daran erinnert, wie japanische Freiwillige uns Deutschen geholfen haben, als das Jahrhunderthochwasser 2013 Orte im Osten und Süden unseres Landes überschwemmt hat. Das war eine Geste, die wir und die ganz viele Menschen in Deutschland bis heute nicht vergessen haben.

Umso schöner ist es auch zu sehen, dass die Hilfsbereitschaft nun einige Deutsche zurückgegeben konnten, die in der Nähe von Hiroshima bei den Aufräumarbeiten mit angepackt haben, die Schutt und Schlamm beseitigt und die japanischen Helfer nach besten Kräften unterstützt haben.

Auf Japanisch und auf Deutsch gibt es dafür ein sehr ähnliches Sprichwort. Es lautet: „Den wahren Freund erkennst Du in der Not.“

Japan und Deutschland sind wahre Freunde.

Darum ist es auch kein Zufall, dass die erste Asienreise, die ich als Außenminister unternehme, mich zuerst nach Japan führt.

Unsere Länder verbindet viel mehr, als die geographische Entfernung es vermuten ließe. Dabei meine ich nicht nur das Klischee, dass viele vor Augen haben, wonach Japaner und Deutsche immer fleißig, ordentlich und pünktlich sind.

In den angesagten Stadtteilen von Berlin, Düsseldorf oder Frankfurt gehört Ramen inzwischen zu den Grundnahrungsmitteln. Junge Leute in Deutschland lieben Manga, Anime, Cosplay. Bücher von Haruki Murakami stehen regelmäßig ganz oben auf unseren Bestsellerlisten in Deutschland. Und 740 Hochschulkooperationen sind, wie ich finde, Ausdruck einer einmalig vernetzten Wissenschaftslandschaft.

Ich kann Sie also nur ermutigen: Nutzen Sie diese Partnerschaften, kommen Sie auch nach Deutschland, sie sind dort sehr willkommen, und lernen Sie unser Land, und die Menschen dort kennen! Frei nach dem in ganz Ostasien verbreiteten Sprichwort: „Einmal sehen ist besser als hundert Mal hören.“ (百聞は一見に如かず)

Für uns Deutsche verkörpert Japan wie kaum ein anderes Land die faszinierende Mischung aus Treue zur Tradition und rasantem technologischen Fortschritt.

Ich komme gerade von einem Besuch im Zōjō-ji -Tempel. Dahinter ragt der Tokyo Tower in den Himmel und ringsherum pulsiert die Energie dieser Megacity, die in ihrer Ausdehnung für einen Europäer immer noch etwas kaum Fassbares ist.

Die Gegensätze, die Dynamik dieser Stadt, die zieht einen schon nach wenigen Stunden in ihren Bann - und so geht es auch vielen meiner Landsleute, und auch vielen in Europa, über Deutschland hinaus. Der französische Ethnologe Claude Lévi-Strauss, ein großer Kenner Ihres Landes, hat Japan aufgrund dieser harmonischen Verbindung von Gegensätzen einmal als „das Beispiel für eine humane Moderne“ bezeichnet. Ich finde, das ist eine sehr treffende Beschreibung.

Spätestens seit der Fußball-Weltmeisterschaft schließt unsere Bewunderung für Japan auch sportliche Glanzleistungen mit ein, auch wenn wir das mit einer gewissen Trauer in der Stimme bekennen müssen.

Das japanische Team hat Menschen auf der ganzen Welt durch die Art und Weise, wie man dort aufgetreten ist, und durch den Kampfgeist bis zur letzten Minute begeistert. Und nach dem Schreck über unser eigenes frühes Ausscheiden haben viele Menschen in Deutschland den Japanern die Daumen gedrückt – und das nicht nur, weil sieben japanische Nationalspieler in der deutschen Bundesliga spielen. Nein, auch dank Yuya Osako haben wir sogar ein neues Wort gelernt: 半端ない! (Anmerkung: hampanai ist seit der WM das japanische Trendwort. Es wird mit dem Spieler Osako in Verbindung gebracht wird. Bedeutung: unglaublich, großartig, krass!)

So interessant auch Fußball sein mag – das ist nicht der Grund, weshalb ich hierhergekommen bin. Zur Zeit ist auch in Deutschland die Diskussion über Fußball durchaus eine politische Diskussion, auf die ich hier gar nicht groß eingehen will. Außerdem haben wir mit Lukas Podolski hier in Japan einen außerordentlich prominenten Fußballbotschafter.

Ich möchte gerne heute etwas sagen über die gewaltigen Umbrüche, die wir gerade im Moment auf der Welt erleben, und die Japan und auch Deutschland in ganz ähnlicher Weise herausfordern.

In Europa, aber natürlich noch viel mehr hier in Japan, haben z.B. die nordkoreanischen Raketen- und Atomtests der beiden letzten Jahre große Sorge ausgelöst. Und in Europa haben uns spätestens die Kämpfe in der Ostukraine und die Flüchtlingsströme aus Syrien und dem Irak gezeigt, dass wir eben nicht auf einer „Insel der Glückseligen“ leben.

Verstärkt wird dies nun auch durch die Ungewissheit über den Kurs der USA unter Präsident Trump, der über Jahrzehnte gewachsene Allianzen durchaus auch schon mal per Tweet in 280 Zeichen in Frage stellt. Russland hat die Weltordnung durch seine völkerrechtswidrige Annexion der Krim und sein Verhalten auch im Syrien-Konflikt offen herausgefordert.

China will die geopolitische Machtbalance zu seinen Gunsten verschieben und verlangt von vielen in der Nachbarschaft etwas, was ich als Gefolgschaft bezeichne.

In dieser weltpolitischen Lage brauchen wir, wie ich finde, einen deutsch-japanischen Schulterschluss, weil es auch ein Schulterschluss von Werten ist. Unsere Länder sind zu klein, um allein jeweils im Machtkonzert der Weltmächte den Ton anzugeben. Deshalb müssen wir uns in diesen Zeiten auch über neue Wege Gedanken machen.

Es wird so bleiben, dass einzeln es für jeden von uns schwer bleibt, ein „rule maker“ zu sein in einer multipolaren Welt. Aber das heißt nicht, dass wir uns mit der Rolle des „rule taker“ abfinden wollen!

Wenn wir unsere Stärken bündeln, und das können wir noch mehr, als wir es in der Vergangenheit getan haben, können wir gemeinsam vielleicht so etwas werden wie „rule shaper“ – Gestalter und Motoren einer internationalen Ordnung, die die Welt bitter nötig hat.

Heute haben wir hier in Tokio, einen Schritt in diese Richtung gemacht: Außenminister Kōno und ich haben gerade eben vereinbart, uns künftig noch enger und häufiger miteinander abzustimmen. Aber wir haben auch eine noch engere Zusammenarbeit unserer Diplomaten, Staatssekretäre, Abteilungsleiter bis hin zu den Planungsstäben angestoßen und dazu eine gemeinsame Erklärung verfasst und unterzeichnet.

Wir wollen einen gemeinsamen Blick auf die regionalen und die globalen Probleme entwickeln und dann gemeinsam nach Lösungen suchen und auch anpacken. Dabei bauen wir auf geteilte Werte und auf die historisch gewachsene Verbundenheit unserer Gesellschaften.

Es gibt wohl kaum zwei Länder, die so weit voneinander entfernt liegen wie Japan und Deutschland, deren Geschichte sich aber in den vergangenen 150 Jahren so parallel entwickelt hat. Und zwar mit allen Höhen und auch Tiefen.

Ähnlich wie die Industrialisierung in Deutschland hat es in Japan Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts eine Entwicklung gegeben, die dieses Land in den Kreis der führenden Industrienationen nahezu katapultiert hat. Auf diese intellektuelle und politische Meisterleistung kann man hier durchaus stolz sein.

Wir Deutschen sind auch ein wenig stolz darauf, dass die deutschen Wissenschaftler und auch die Staatsmänner und -frauen dazu beigetragen haben, dass es bei uns eine ähnliche Entwicklung genommen hat. So, und das sage ich auch als ehemaliger Justizminister, ist es für uns immer noch eine besondere Tatsache, dass zum Beispiel das japanische Rechtssystem bis heute eng an das deutsche angelehnt.

Den Zweiten Weltkrieg erlebten beide Länder als eine existenzbedrohende Katastrophe - für uns in Deutschland ging das mit einer moralischen Bankrotterklärung einher.

Darauf folgte – auch dank der ausgestreckten Hand der westlichen Siegermächte – ein wahrhaft kometenhafter wirtschaftlicher Aufstieg. Und die dauerhafte Hinwendung unserer Länder zu Freiheit, Demokratie und Rechtsstaat ist auch keine Selbstverständlichkeit gewesen, aber sie ist das Fundament, auf dem unsere Wertepartnerschaft heute beruht.

Eine Säule dieser Partnerschaft ist der freie Welthandel. Japan und Europa profitieren gleichermaßen davon. Deshalb fordert der neue Protektionismus, über den bedauerlicherweise so viel auf der internationalen Bühne gesprochen wird, und die Politik des „America First“, die dahinter steht, uns auch gemeinsam heraus.

Die richtige Antwort darauf gibt auch das letzte Woche unterzeichnete Freihandelsabkommen zwischen der Europäischen Union und Japan. Für mich ein Meilenstein. Denn letztlich entsteht dadurch nicht nur eine noch viel engere Abstimmung und noch viel mehr neue Möglichkeiten, es entsteht vor allem die größte Freihandelszone der Welt.

Wir prägen Standards für den globalen Handel: Zum Beispiel in Umwelt und in Klimafragen, beim Schutz von Verbraucherinnen und Verbrauchern, der Einhaltung von Sozialstandards oder auch im Wettbewerbsrecht.

Und ich hoffe, dass wir auch in den laufenden Verhandlungen über besseren Investitionsschutz bald zu einer Einigung kommen und dann auch dort weitere neue Standards setzen können.

Das ist es, was ich unter „rule shaper“ dann auch ganz praktisch verstehe!

Noch wichtiger ist aber vielleicht das Signal in Richtung Osten und auch Westen:

Freier Handel ist für uns kein Nullsummenspiel. Handel mit verlässlichen Regeln schafft letztlich Wohlstand für alle.

Nicht nur die USA definieren freien Handel zur Zeit auf jeden Fall irgendwie anders. Auch in China stehen unsere Unternehmen immer wieder vor Hürden beim Marktzugang.

Viele klagen über mangelhaften Schutz geistigen Eigentums oder erzwungenen Technologietransfer. Ich wünsche mir daher, dass Japan und Europa weiter gemeinsam gegen solche Handelspraktiken vorgehen, Strategien und Konzepte entwickeln. An der Stelle teilen wir auch viele Interessen mit den Vereinigten Staaten. Es ist deshalb weiter wichtig, auch auf die trilaterale Kooperation zwischen Japan, der EU und den USA zu setzen, wo immer das eben möglich ist - um das internationale Handelssystem zu stärken und auch, gerade in der aktuellen Diskussion, um die USA an Bord zu halten.

Fairer Handel braucht starke Institutionen und das auf allen Ebenen, allen voran ganz sicherlich die Welthandelsorganisation. Um die WTO zu bewahren, muss auch dort Einiges modernisiert werden.

Ich denke dabei zum Beispiel an moderne Regeln für den digitalen Handel oder für den Umgang auch mit Staatsunternehmen. Japan und Deutschland, die sich darüber schon eine nicht unerhebliche Anzahl von Gedanken gemacht haben, können an der Stelle durchaus auch als Vordenker dabei gemeinsam agieren.

Auch beim Umgang mit künstlicher Intelligenz oder der Digitalisierung unserer Arbeits- und Lebenswelt können und sollen Deutschland und Japan noch viel enger zusammenarbeiten.

Ob in Berlin oder in Tokio – die Menschen stellen doch ähnliche Fragen in allen Bereichen.

Ist mein Job noch sicher in Zeiten der Digitalisierung?

Überholt künstliche Intelligenz irgendwann den menschlichen Verstand?

Welche Vorteile bringt größere Vernetzung und wo liegen ihre Risiken?

Und wir in Deutschland fragen wir uns oft, warum, wenn es um irgendetwas Neues geht, immer sofort die Diskussion über die Risiken in den Vordergrund gestellt wird, bevor noch nicht einmal richtig abgeschätzt wurde, was ist denn der eigentliche Nutzen und wo können uns solche Entwicklungen, und allen, nicht nur wenigen, helfen.

Und deshalb ist ein Schwerpunkt der Reise hierher auch, gemeinsam mit deutschen und japanischen Experten nach Antworten auf genau diese Fragen zu suchen.

So sehr uns die wirtschaftliche Dynamik Asiens beeindruckt und so wichtig freier Welthandel ist – unser Blick auf Asien darf aber nicht nur auf wirtschaftliche Interessen beschränkt sein. Ich sage das durchaus auch selbstkritisch auch mit Blick auf die europäische Asienpolitik der letzten Jahrzehnte.

Auf keinem anderen Kontinent bündeln sich die globalen Herausforderungen so sehr wie das in Asien der Fall ist.

Territorialkonflikte wie im Südchinesischen Meer, die Lage im Ostchinesischen Meer oder die nukleare Bewaffnung Nordkoreas gefährden die gesamte internationale Ordnung. Wenn wir zulassen, dass die Einschüchterung von Nachbarländern oder der Bruch völkerrechtlicher Regeln stillschweigend akzeptiert werden, dann ist die Ordnung, um die es geht, eigentlich schon verloren.

Morgen werden wir Gespräche mit der koreanischen Regierung in Seoul führen. Auch mit unserem Partner Korea teilen wir das Bekenntnis zu freiem Handel und einer regelbasierten Welt.

Nordkoreas Nuklearstreben fordert diese Weltordnung schon seit einiger Zeit fundamental heraus. Der Erhalt der nuklearen Ordnung ist eben keine regionale Frage, sondern eine Überlebensfrage für die gesamte Menschheit.

Das Treffen von Präsident Trump mit Kim Jong Un in Singapur war ein erster und, ja ich sage auch, ein richtiger Schritt weg von der Eskalation gerade im vergangenen Jahr. Aber natürlich müssen weitere Schritte folgen hin zu einer kompletten, unumkehrbaren und überprüfbaren Denuklearisierung Nordkoreas – darüber sind wir uns heute in unseren Gesprächen hier in Tokio einig gewesen.

Erst wenn Nordkorea erkennbar auf den Boden internationalen Rechts zurückkehrt, erst dann kommen auch überhaupt Diskussionen, Gespräche, Überlegungen über Sanktionserleichterungen überhaupt erst in Betracht. Wenn man das anders handhaben würde, würde derjenige vorschnell belohnt, der bereits unzählige Male internationales Recht gebrochen und auf diese Art und Weise überhaupt erst Nuklearwaffen erlangt hat. Das wäre ein fatales Signal, vor allen Dingen auch über Ostasien hinaus.

Wir sind bereit, im Rahmen unserer Möglichkeiten, uns bei der Suche nach einer Lösung einzubringen. Wir haben Expertise, etwa in den schwierigen Nuklearverhandlungen in den vergangenen Jahren mit dem Iran gesammelt.

Auch dort ging es ja im Kern darum, nukleare Aufrüstung durch ein weltweit einmaliges Transparenzregime eben zu verhindern. Und im Übrigen, unser Festhalten an der Vereinbarung mit dem Iran ist auch ein Signal an Nordkorea und andere Staaten, dass es sich lohnt, das Streben nach Nuklearwaffen aufzugeben.

Denn letztlich: jede internationale Ordnung beruht vor allen Dingen auf einem, nämlich auf Vertrauen. Und Vertrauen entsteht nur, wenn Verträge auch eingehalten werden und ein heute gegebenes Wort nicht morgen schon widerrufen wird.

Deutschland und Japan, und davon bin ich fest überzeugt, stehen für diese Art der Verlässlichkeit. Unsere Ansätze dazu sind auch ähnlich:

In den Vereinten Nationen, der G7 und der G20 setzen wir konsequent auf eine Zukunft der multilateralen Weltordnung und treten dafür ein.

Politische Lösungen und ziviles Krisenmanagement denken wir zusammen und sie stehen für uns bei der Konfliktbewältigung immer im Vordergrund.

Wir werben, auch das ist ein Thema heute in unseren Gesprächen, nach wie vor für Rüstungskontrolle.

Und vielleicht ist es auch die deutsch-japanische Wertschätzung von klaren Regeln, die uns immer wieder dafür eintreten lässt, dass Streitigkeiten auf dem Boden des Völkerrechts gelöst werden müssen. Das sieht ja heute auch nicht mehr jeder so. Das gilt für den Konflikt in der Ukraine genauso wie für die Anerkennung internationaler Schiedssprüche, zum Beispiel im Südchinesischen Meer.

Ich freue mich, auch das haben wir heute zum Ausdruck gebracht, dass Japan als Vorsitz der G20 im nächsten Jahr auch solche außenpolitischen Fragen auf die Tagesordnung setzen will.

Wenn Deutschland Anfang 2019 für zwei Jahre in den Sicherheitsrat der Vereinten Nationen einziehen wird, dann werden wir uns auch deshalb in außen- und sicherheitspolitischen Fragen eng mit Japan abstimmen. Denn, und auch das will ich hier ganz bewusst in Tokio sagen, für uns gehört Japan in einen VN-Sicherheitsrat, der die Weltordnung des 21. Jahrhunderts widerspiegelt. Für einen solchen zeitgemäßen Sicherheitsrat setzen wir uns gemeinsam als G4 zusammen mit Brasilien und Indien nach wie vor ein.

Es gibt viele echte Erfolgsgeschichten deutsch-japanischer Kooperation und daran wollen wir anknüpfen. Manche muss man auch noch mal in Erinnerung rufen.

In Afghanistan haben wir gemeinsam Erfahrungen gesammelt beim Wiederaufbau dieses Landes. Darauf lässt sich aufbauen, wenn es darum geht, andere Krisengebiete zu stabilisieren.

In Syrien und den Nachbarländern tragen Japan und Deutschland durch ihre humanitäre Hilfe entscheidend dazu bei, die Not der Menschen im Kriegsgebiet und das Leid der Flüchtlinge zumindest etwas zu lindern. Das fortzusetzen ist wichtiger denn je, gerade wenn andere Geber ihre Unterstützung zurückfahren, wie es bedauerlicherweise gegenwärtig auch der Fall ist

Und in Afrika haben Deutschland und Japan in den vergangenen Jahren deutlich mehr Verantwortung für Stabilität und Sicherheit übernommen. Diesen Weg wollen wir, auch das hat uns heute beschäftigt, ganz entschlossen weitergehen. Bedauerlicherweise gibt es dafür in Afrika auch eine große Notwendigkeit.

Deutschland und Japan können zum Kern einer Allianz der Multilateralisten werden.

Einer Allianz von Ländern,

die bestehende Regeln gemeinsam verteidigen und auch weiterentwickeln, dort, wo es notwendig ist.

die Solidarität zeigen, wenn internationales Recht vor der Haustür des jeweils anderen mit Füßen getreten wird.

die Leerstellen füllen, die auch durch den Rückzug von anderen aus weiten Teilen der Weltbühne entstehen und entstanden sind.

die sich für den Klimaschutz stark machen und das war eine der größten Herausforderungen der Menschheit.

die gemeinsam Verantwortung übernehmen in internationalen Organisationen – finanziell, aber nicht nur finanziell, sondern auch und gerade politisch.

Wir brauchen eine solche Allianz gerade auch in Asien, das zwar wirtschaftlich schon eng verflochten, aber oft auch von politischen Gegensätzen gespalten ist. Eine Allianz der Multilateralisten wäre auch eine Stütze für all die Länder in dieser Region, die es vielleicht noch schwerer haben als Deutschland oder Japan, mit ihren Anliegen tatsächlich auch gehört zu werden.

Ich denke etwa an die Inselstaaten des Pazifik. Freier Welthandel, offene Seewege oder der Kampf gegen den Klimawandel betreffen auch sie – und zwar oft auf ganz existenzielle Art und Weise. Und wenn man mit den Vertretern dieser Länder spricht, erklären sie einem sehr eindrücklich, was der Nexus zwischen Klimawandel und Sicherheit ist, dort, wo sie leben.

Deshalb, meine Damen und Herren, Deutschland und Japan sind sich in vielen Fragen einig und ihre strategische Ausrichtung ist auch sehr kooperativ. Deshalb haben wir mit unserem Besuch heute hier in Tokio noch einmal deutlich machen wollen, dass wir für unsere japanischen Freundinnen und Freunde als Partner bereit stehen. Dabei ist es gut, dass einem auf der japanischen Seite das Gleiche entgegenkommt.

ありがとうございます Vielen Dank noch einmal, dass wir die Möglichkeit haben, unseren Besuch und unsere politischen Gespräche heute hier zu verbinden mit einer Veranstaltung wie dieser. Denn ich bin fest davon überzeugt, dass es in der Politik allzu oft einen Fehler gibt, der bedauerlicherweise überall gemacht wird: Dass politisch Verantwortliche, selbst wenn sie die gleiche Auffassung teilen, leider oftmals nur miteinander reden. Und ich verstehe einen ganz wesentlichen Teil der politischen Arbeit darin, dass, wenn man es geschafft hat, sich politisch mit Freunden zu einigen, ein Projekt auf den Weg zu bringen oder eine Strategie zu verfolgen, dass man sich sofort um eines kümmern muss: nämlich um ein Mindestmaß an Akzeptanz dessen, wofür man eintreten will, in der Gesellschaft, in der man lebt. Und vielleicht konnten wir heute mit dieser Veranstaltung dazu beitragen.

Herzlichen Dank, ich freue mich auf die Diskussion.