de-en  Staat und Religion in Deutschland. Historische und aktuelle Dynamiken im Religionsrecht.
Author: Hans Michael Heinig.

Constitutional law on religion in Germany is largely shaped by its history. [1} Anyone who ignores the history of the religious legal system will ultimately misjudge the challenges of the present. A look into the past also helps to anticipate its possible future development: without knowledge of past dynamics the future perspectives appear far too static. For in doing this, the long road the churches have walked till they became today's supporting elements of a liberal and democratic constitional order is blocked out. [2] Both warp the view of reality in a harmful way.

From laws at the time of the reformation to laws dealing with the results of secularization.

The religious law in Germany is first of all a consequence of the Reformation [3], for it was essentially formed by the schism associated with the nascent Reformation in 1517: unlike in northern and southern Europe, two equally strong religious parties emerged in this country. The dispute about the true belief led to civil wars between dominations which came to an end with the Peace of Westphalia in 1648. With it, the religious question of truth was suspended to some extent in the political space. ... An early form of secularized public authority emerged - but only at the level of the realm itself. At first the individual territorial states adhered to the ideal of confessional homogenity: the sovereigns decided on religion in their domain. In protestant territories sovereignty over the church emerged, yet a close alliance between throne and altar was also formed in catholic imperial estates.


Freedom of religion and equal treatment of all religions and world views were only gradually established The Prussian Civil Code of 1794 and the Principal Decree of the Imperial Deputation of 1803 represented important steps, just as the failed bourgeois revolution of 1849 and the subsequently "imposed" constitutions from above. Their laws on freedom and equality did not really hold up under pressure, as Bismark's "Kulturkampf" ("culture war") against the Roman Catholic Church in particular showed. This started shortly after the founding of the German Reich was orchestrated in 1871 by Protestant Prussia, with Catholic Austria being excluded. German Catholicism was ravished despite all constitutional guarantees - a long-lasting trauma[4].


With the founding of the Weimar Republic there was also a decisive turning point in religious constitutional law: state rule over the church came to an end, as did every other form of state church and state religion. The Weimar Reich Constitution (WRV) of 1919 guaranteed for the first time throughout Germany individual and corporate religious freedom and prohibited discrimination on the basis of religion or creed.


Intensive discussions were held at the time on how the separation of church and state should be shaped. One found an inventive compromise between the conflicting interests: Germany would not go the French way of secularism and oust religion from civic life, but the separation was to take place "in an amicable way." 5] Cooperations remained possible on a selective basis, for example with theological faculties or denominational religious education in public schools. The public-law legal form for religious communities was also retained and from then on was accessible to all religions and world views. The aim was to preserve the taxation of members as an efficient form of financing and to underline the cultural significance of religion. It was also seen that the status of a corporate body frequently allowed a self-management according to the theological self-image better than the civil law on associations.


The Weimar Republic collapsed at such an early stage that the religious provisions of its constitution could not really prove themselves in democratic every day life. Not until the Bonn Republic could it be spelled out in detail what the separation of church and state implemented in 1919 meant – now, against the backdrop of the breakdown in civilization by the Nationalist Socialist State, which had conducted a murderous religious policy.


Text unchanged, society changed.

In 1949, the Parliamentary Council incorporated the essential provisions of the Weimar Compromise on Religion into the Basic Law (Grundgesetz, GG). However, the fundamental right of freedom of religion was, unlike in article 135 WRV in article. 4th paragraph 1 and 2 Basic Law revised without reservation in law. Only constitutional rights of third parties and public welfare matters with constitutional status should justify restrictions on religious freedom. The text of religious constitutional law has remained unchanged to this day, i.e. it will be one hundred years old in 2019. But the religious empiricism has changed considerably. Whilst in 1949 almost all citizens were still members of the two main Christian churches, in the 1960's a process of increasing secularisation, individualisation and pluralism began to take place. In urban areas and East Germany, those who are not religiously or ideologically organised now often make up the majority. In addition, migration significantly changed the composition of religious affiliations in Germany[6].


This change from a biconfessional to a multi-, diffuse and non-religious society is also reflected in legal practice. Immediately after the founding of the Federal Republic, a very church-friendly interpretation of the Basic Law took hold: church and state were regarded as socially stabilizing forces on equal footing, and a quasi sovereignty of its own was conferred on the churches. This approach quickly met with criticism, and the federal constitutional court rejected it in the end: all religious denominations are naturally subject to the civil legal system and at the same time protected in their freedom by this.


Gradually, the facts on which constitutional court decisions were based changed, just as society changed in religious matters. ... While at first it was more likely a matter of minority protection in a Christian-dominated society, more recently the subject of legal contentions were, for example, Islamic classes at school, the opening of stores on Sundays during the Advent season, the corporate status for the Bahá' í faith or state funding for different Jewish institutions.


For a long time a broad consensus prevailed in the Federal Republic regarding how the guidelines of the Basic Law are to be understood: unequal treatment of religions and world views are permissible only to a limited extent in the presence of objective reasons. Religion is not only a private matter, but can be carried into the state sphere by the citizens. But the state has no religious identity of its own. It may not identify with any particular religion or ideology. ... Apart from the exceptions governed in the constitution, the basic principle is that religious denominations are not to assume any state tasks and the state assumes no tasks of the denominations. But the religiously and ideologically neutral state does not have to act completely religion-blind as a cultural and welfare state. It can for example consider Diakonie and Catholic Charities as service providers and be allowed to take an interest in the social effects of religious culture. It can encourage the free association of religious citizens, just as it also supports athletic and artistic activities. It may for example draw attention in school lessons to people who had a strong cultural influence. [7]

But especially in the field of education it also becomes obvious how strongly society has changed regarding religious and ideological questions. The controversy about the headscarfs of female teachers is a typical example for that. At the same time it illustrates quite clearly how the basic right to religious freedom "works in real life."

Headscarf, Cross and Kippa: Religious Freedom in Real Life.

In the tradition of German laws on religion that emphasize freedom of religious choice and cooperation a relaxed and tolerant handling of religiously motivated dress codes at school would have suggested itself. However the question of whether for religious reasons a female teacher is allowed to wear a headscarf in a public school has intensively and controversally been discussed since the end of the 1990s. In theory these debates are always about the cross on a necklace or the kippa as a headdress as well. Yet the Islamic headscarf is in the center of attention. Some see the wearing of head scarves by teachers as an expression of equal religious practice, successful integration and female emancipation. Others, on the other hand, see an Islamic claim to power manifested and the hardwon emancipative gender order threatened.


In this example, it is shown how our society collectively, in connection with the experiences of the bi-confessional society – sometimes even in turning away from them – sometimes thoughtfully and tentatively, sometimes confrontationally and encapsulated in an echo-chamber, searches for the right approach to religious-ideological diversity. This search extends to questions of individual religious freedom as well as to corporate rights of religious communities with regard to religious education, theological faculties, prison and military pastoral care, but also as service providers in the welfare state and as public corporations of own kind which are not part of state administration. The overall questions is if and how openly practised religion will be allowed in spheres of society for which state institutions are responsible.


In order for fundamental rights to develop their freedom protection effectively and rationally, different questions are submitted from a legal perspective: What behavior and which persons are generally protected by fundamental rights (scope of protection)? Is there in a specific case an impairment of this freedom attributable to the state (intervention)? Is such a violation of fundamental rights legitimized by the Basic Law (constitutional justification)?

Freedom of Religion and Action

In the protected area of religious freedom the individual should be able to develop freely in his religious and ideological orientation. These in art. (article) 4 paragraph 1 and 2 of the Basic law mentioned attributes of faith, confession and practice of religion are to be understood in their context of meaning. Freedom of religion then means "freedom to have or not to have a faith, to accept or reject a faith, to retain or abandon one's faith, to confess or not to confess one's faith, to perform a particular act for religious motives or to refrain from religious motives or to keep one's actions free from any religious motivation". [8] As a consequence, religious freedom is to be understood widely as "the right of the individual to orient his entire conduct to the teachings of his faith and to act according to his inner religious conviction"[9].


The individual must be able to plausibly convey that his behaviour is motivated by religion. It does not matter whether religious authorities consider a certain action or omission to be imperative. Religious freedom is not limited to following authoritative doctrines. Individual religious and ideological self-determination just means being allowed to form one's own conviction. With the headscarf it is therefore irrelevant that among Muslims it is disputed which forms of dress the Islamic tradition demands.


Also the sometimes heard reproach in political debates that Islam is a political ideology and not a religion must be ignored for the question of what is covered by the scope of protection of Article 4 of the Basic Law. The state can only grant religious freedom in the full sense when it declares itself theologically unqualified and does not try to give answers of its own to religious questions of truth. In practice, there are repeatedly borderline cases when it has to be decided whether something can be considered to be "religion" in the legal sense – for example, when critics of religion act as disciples of a flying spaghetti monster. Relating to Islam, however, there is no serious doubt that it is a world religion with centuries of tradition. It is characterised by social functions, cultural practices and linguistic idiosyncrasies typical of religions. Therefore, the behaviour in the Islamic faith tradition undoubtedly falls within the scope of the protection of religious freedom. The rights of third parties and public interest interests, on the other hand, are not taken into account in determining the scope of protection. They play a role in the modern thinking of fundamental rights only at the level of justifying impairments of freedom, since in the liberal constitutional state it is not the use of freedom but rather its state restriction that has to be justified.


This model of determining the scope of protection of religious freedom was developed under conditions of bi-confessionalism in the 1960s but retains its validity under changed societal circumstances as well. There are always proposals to make the scope of protection more restrictive. Yet those who want to restrict religious freedom to religious services and prayers or to the adherence to official church doctrines miss the real point of religious freedom, that is the protection of individual religious-philosophical self-determination from which the rights of religious bodies are ultimately derived.


Justification of state restrictions on freedom.

In 1949, the Parliamentary Council deliberately decided against including a legal reservation for religious freedom. The legislator should not be allowed to restrict basic rights for arbitrary political reasons but only in as much as it is called for in a proportionate manner to protect the rights of third parties or other matters of public interest on a constitutional level. Colliding rights must be balanced as gently as possible. It is not always easy to determine when a third party right stands in the way of religious freedom and what exactly an appropriate equalisation of legal interests is. Experts seldom agree on these detailed questions.


In the case of a teacher's headscarf, the dissent went so far that the First and the Second Senate of the Federal Constitutional Court made contradictory decisions. [10] In 2003 the second senate saw in the pupils' right to religious freedom and in the parents' rights with regard to the religious upbringing of their children the existence of third party rights that were potentially in conflict with the religious freedom of the teacher. [11] In addition, he tried the state school supervisory authority (Article 7 paragraph 1 basic law), which also includes peace at school as an integration and functional prerequisite for schooling. Since greater religious diversity is accompanied with a greater potential for conflict, it is possible that a more distancing separation of state and religion is necessary than has traditionally been maintained in Germany. In any case, religiously connoted clothing creates an "abstract danger" for the peace at school among teachers. Therefore, the legislator can prohibit such.


The First Senate disagreed in 2015. [12] Religious clothing such as the Islamic headscarf is an everyday phenomenon. Since religious freedom does not protect pupils from confrontations with religious-ideological convictions of others the pupils' religious freedom as well as the parents' right of education are not substantially impaired. Moreover, an abstract danger for school peace was not sufficient to demand neutral clothing from teaching staff. The concrete circumstances on site or at least in the school district are decisive. A blanket ban was disproportionate.


In contrast, the Federal Constitutional Court agreed on how to deal with the ambiguity of the "symbol" headscarf. The court did not adopt the view prevalent in some parts of society that the Islamic headscarf is an expression of an attitude inimical to emancipation. Such interpretations do exist and they contribute to the conflict risk of the headscarf. But they did not simply superimpose the religious intention of the headscarf wearer, which was protected by fundamental rights.


Also revealing are the statements of both senates on the question of whether the wearing of religiously influenced clothing by civil servants represents a violation against the obligation for neutrality of religious-ideology. This principle is not explicitly mentioned in the Basic Law, but in the freedom of religion, the religious-related guarantees of equality (Article 3 Paragraph 3 Basic law, Article 33 paragraph 3 Basic law, Article 140 Basic Law in conjunction with Article 136 paragraph 1 and 2 Weimar Imperial Constitution and the prohibition of the state church (Article 140 Basic law in connection with article 137 Paragraph 1 Weimar Imperial Constitution) in a summary extracted. [13] According to the Federal Constitutional Court, everyone is aware that religiously influenced clothing such as a kippa or headscarf only expresses the individual convictions of teachers, which the state as a whole does not adopt as its own.


This decisively distinguishes the difference between the headscarf worn by a teacher and the state-ordered crucifix in the classroom, which affected opinions in 1995. At that time, the Federal Constitutional Court rejected a provision in the Bavarian school law, according to which a crucifix had to be hung up in every classroom. The court later explicitly emphasized the differences between the teacher's headscarf and the crucifix in the classroom. [14] While the state affixing order also expresses that the beliefs symbolized by the crucifix are "exemplary and worthy of observance", [15] religiously influenced dress of individual teachers has no such appellative effect in itself. In the 1995 crucifix decision, the constitutional court also emphasized that by no means could the cross be reduced to symbolize a Western culture that was shaped by Christianity. The religiously and ideologically neutral state may allow Christian references in the public school system, but it must exclude coercion as much as possible. For example, school prayers and church services may only be held if participation is voluntary. School crucifixes must also be removed in case of doubt[16].


Increasing consistency problems as an expression of social embarrassment.

Each of the three guiding decisions outlined is comprehensibly justified. Together, however, they are not easy to communicate beyond the narrow circle of legal experts. Sometimes the Basic Law should allow a general legal ban on religious clothing of state employees (as the 2003 decision), then again not (thus 2015). The governments position on the crucifix in the classroom must yield when contradicted by students and parents, the teacher's headscarf, however, if one follows the decision of 2015, only when there is concrete disturbance of the school peace. The state may operate "Christian community schools", but may not provide for an obligatory crucifix in the classroom (so 1995).


From a legal point of view these results are understandable, but the overall impression is not consistent. Now it is wise to ask the Constitutional Court to coordinate its decisions better. In fact, the court is always exposed to the current trends. Islam in its many facets is currently encountering social reservations that are partly sweeping, partly hateful, and partly differentiated. At the same time, a privileged treatment of the Christian faith or the Christian churches seems unacceptable by the majority. In addition, there is the progressive trend towards secular interpretations of being. This mixed situation has for some time given rise to increasingly secular tendencies that are contrary to the constitution intention and tradition in Germany.


In light of the experience gained in France for example, it is doubtful that Germany would be well advised to make a radical change in the constitutional law on religion. Nevertheless, constitutional law is currently losing its guiding force. No one, for example, is able to reliably predict on the basis of the cases decided so far how the constitutional court will give a ruling on the headscarfs of state prosecutors and judges in the near future. In the political realm it was even discussed recently whether or not the wearing of religiously oriented clothing should be prohibited per se for children before their reaching the age of religious maturity. Because the unconstitutionality of such a ban would have been obvious to everyone, there would not have been such a debate even ten years ago. It appears yet to be only a matter of time until even the nativity scene in the town square and the Christmas tree in front of the chancellor's office are called into question.


Contrary to such tendencies, the Bavarian state government recently wanted to set an example and decided that a crucifix could be hung in the entrance area in every state office. The decision was met with massive criticism, also from the ranks of the churches and academic theology. {17] While Bavarian politicians and bishops in Munich rallied together in 1995 against the crucifix decision of the constitutional court, a completely new hostile attitude appeared in 2018: from the church's standpoint, one sensed an exploitation of the central symbol of Christianity for electioneering purposes and showed itself worried due to its profanization, since the cross in an authority of the religiously and ideologically neutral state was stripped of its religious and theological meaning as a matter of law. So a gesture that was supposed to address the socially conservative and church-committed voters ultimately provoked irritations on all sides, with decided-secularists, the religiously indifferent, Muslims and Jews, and even with Christians. In contrast to 1995, it once again becomes apparent how far advanced the erosion of the old federal republican truisms is on questions of religious and worldview policy, even in Bavaria.

Outlook.

Many experts emphasise that Germany has had good experiences in the past with its religious constitutional law as a whole. [18] The religious and ideological peace was assured. The destructive potentials inherent in all religions were harnessed and their socially productive forces stimulated. [19] Mutual encroachments between religion and politics were the exception. The citizens cultivated tolerance among themselves to ensure politeness.


Of course, even the wisest constitutional text cannot guarantee its own practical effectiveness. In the future, the constitutional law on religion oriented to the same freedom, cooperative segregation and general public will only continue to develop its integrating effects, even though the leading social groups sufficiently form accommodating ways of life. The further dynamics will therefore depend above all on whether a sustainable balance of interests between secular and religiously minded citizens succeeds; society as a whole learns better to distinguish serious threats to the common good posed by individual religious cultures from mere cultural experiences of foreignness; the socially relevant religious cultures can credibly demonstrate that they are compatible with a liberal-democratic social order; additional institutional actors know how to deal elegantly with the unwritten rules of German neo-corporatism and whether immigrants make a history foreign to them, to which the history of religion (law) also belongs, their own and continue to write as such.

Footnotes 1 On these influences, most recently Hans Michael Heinig, Precarious Orders. Historical patterns of religious law in Germany, Tübingen 2018; Horst Dreier, State without God. Religion in Secular Modernism, Munich 2018, p. 63 ff. ; Christoph Schönberger, Stages of German Religious Law from the Reformation until today, in: Zeitschrift für evangelisches Kirchenrecht 4/2017, p. 333-347, with comments by Stefan Korioth (ibid., p. 348-353) and Olivier Beaud (ibid., p. 354-361); Hendrik Munsonius, Öffentliche Religion im säkularen Staat, Heidelberg 2016, p. 11ff.


2 On Catholicism, for example Christian Waldhoff, Katholizmus und Verfassungsstaat(Catholicism and the constitutional state), in: Jahres- und Tagungsbericht (Annual and Conference Report) of the Görres Society 2010, Bonn 2011, p. 43ff. and Protestantism Hans Michael Heinig, Säkularer Staat, viele Religionen (Secular State, many religions), Freiburg/Br. 2018, p. 81 ff.


cf. 3 Christian Walter, Consequences of the Reformation, Secularization and Pluralization, in: Zeitschrift für evangelisches Kirchenrecht 4/2017, pp. 395-414.

4 The individual measures are documented in Ernst-Rudolf Huber/Wolfgang Huber (ed. ), State and Church in the 19th and 20th Centuries, Volume 2 Darmstadt 1976, p. 395ff.


5 At a glance, for example, Karl-Hermann Kästner, in: Wolfgang Kahl/Christian Waldhoff/Christian Walter (ed. ), Bonner (comment to the basic law) Kommentar zum Grundgesetz, Heidelberg 2010, Article. 140 Rn. 1ff. See also the article by Thomas Großbölting in this issue (Note. d. Red.).


6 See also the article by Gert Pickel in this issue (Note. d. Red.). (Editors).


7 On religious education in schools, see also the article by Riem Spielhaus and Zrinka Štimac in this issue (note: d. Editors).


8 Michael Germann, in: Volker Epping/Christian Hillgruber, Beck's Online Commentary Basic Law, Munich 2016, Article 4, Rn. 21.


9 Decisions of the Federal Constitutional Court (BVerfGE) 108, p. 282 (297); settled case law.


10 BVerfGE 138, 296ff. ; BVerfGE 108, 282ff. On both decisions, for example, Heinig (Note. 2), p. 17f., S. 109ff.. 11 BVerfGE 108, S. 282 (301, 303).


12 BVerfGE 138, 296ff.


13 On the salary and limits of the principle cf. Heinig (note 2), p. 12ff. ; with a slightly different accent of threesomes (note 1), p. 95ff.


14 BVerfGE 138, 296 (340).


15 BVerfGE 93, 1 (20).


16 The Federal Constitutional Court subsequently did not object to the solution of the objection introduced in reaction to the crucifix ruling. Cf. Federal Constitutional Court, Neue Zeitschrift für Verwaltungsrecht (New Journal for Administrative Law) 1999, p. 757ff.


17 See also the article by Friedrich Wilhelm Graf in this issue (note d. Editor)


18 cf. about Christian Waldhoff, New Religious Conflicts and State Neutrality, Munich 2010; Christoph Möllers, Religious Freedom as a Danger? (Religiöse Freiheit als Gefahr?),, In: Publications of the Association of German State Law Teacher 68/2009, p. 47-93, here p. 87; Stefan Korioth, Reform of German religious law?, In: Horst Groschopp (ed. ), Konfessionsfreie und Grundgesetz, Aschaffenburg 2010, pp. 13-28, here pp. 13ff.

19 cf. Heinig (note 2), p. 27ff.


This text is published under the Creative Commons license. by-nc-nd/3.0/ The name of the author/rights holder shall be named as follows: by-nc-nd/3.0/ Author: Hans Michael Heinig for foreign policy and contemporary history/bpb.de copyright information on images / graphics / videos can be found directly at the illustrations.

http://www.bpb.de/apuz/272101/historische-und-aktuelle-dynamiken-im-religionsrecht?p=all
unit 1
Autor: Hans Michael Heinig.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 2
Das Religionsverfassungsrecht in Deutschland ist in hohem Maße historisch geprägt.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 6
[2] Beides verzerrt die Realitäten auf ungute Weise.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 7
Vom Reformations- zum Säkularisierungsfolgenrecht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 10
Mit ihm wurde die religiöse Wahrheitsfrage im politischen Raum ein Stück weit suspendiert.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 21
unit 29
Unveränderter Textbestand, veränderte Gesellschaft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 31
Das Grundrecht der Religionsfreiheit wurde allerdings, anders als in Art.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 32
135 WRV, in Art.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 33
4 Abs.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 34
1 und 2 GG ohne Gesetzesvorbehalt neu gefasst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 37
Doch die Religionsempirie hat sich erheblich verändert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 48
Der Staat hat aber keine eigene religiöse Identität.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 49
Er darf sich nicht mit einer bestimmten Religion oder Weltanschauung identifizieren.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 54
Er darf auf die kulturellen Prägekräfte des Religiösen hinweisen, etwa im Schulunterricht.[7].
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 56
Exemplarisch steht dafür der Streit um das Kopftuch der Lehrerin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 58
Kopftuch, Kreuz und Kippa: Religionsfreiheit in der Praxis.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 62
Doch im Zentrum der Aufmerksamkeit steht das islamische Kopftuch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 69
Gibt es im konkreten Fall eine dem Staat zurechenbare Beeinträchtigung dieser Freiheit (Eingriff)?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 71
Glaubens- und Handlungsfreiheit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 73
Die in Art.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 74
4 Abs.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 78
Der Einzelne muss plausibel vermitteln können, dass sein Verhalten religiös motiviert ist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 80
Die Religionsfreiheit ist nicht darauf beschränkt, autoritativen Lehrmeinungen zu folgen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 84
4 GG erfasst wird, unbeachtet bleiben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 93
Es gibt zwar immer wieder Vorschläge, den Schutzbereich restriktiver zu fassen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 95
Rechtfertigung staatlicher Freiheitsbeschränkung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 98
Kollidierende Rechte müssen zu einem möglichst schonenden Ausgleich gebracht werden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 100
Fachleute sind in diesen Detailfragen selten einer Meinung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 103
[11] Daneben bemühte er die staatliche Schulaufsicht (Art.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 104
7 Abs.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 105
unit 108
Deshalb könne der Gesetzgeber solche verbieten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 109
Der Erste Senat widersprach 2015.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 110
[12] Religiös geprägte Kleidung wie das islamische Kopftuch sei eine Alltagserscheinung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 113
Entscheidend seien die konkreten Umstände vor Ort oder zumindest im Schulbezirk.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 114
Ein pauschales Verbot sei unverhältnismäßig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 117
Solche Deutungen gebe es zwar und sie trügen zur Konfliktträchtigkeit des Kopftuchs bei.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 121
3 Abs.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 122
3 GG, Art.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 123
33 Abs.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 124
3 GG, Art.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 125
140 GG in Verbindung mit Art.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 126
136 Abs.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 127
1 und 2 WRV) sowie dem Verbot der Staatskirche (Art.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 128
140 GG in Verbindung mit Art.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 129
137 Abs.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 130
1 WRV) in einer Zusammenschau entnommen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 138
unit 139
Ebenso sind Schulkreuze im Zweifel abzuhängen.[16].
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 140
Zunehmende Konsistenzprobleme als Ausdruck gesellschaftlicher Verlegenheit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 141
Jede der drei skizzierten Leitentscheidungen ist für sich nachvollziehbar begründet.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 148
Tatsächlich ist das Gericht immer auch den Strömungen der Zeit ausgesetzt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 151
Hinzu tritt der fortschreitende Trend zu säkularen Seinsdeutungen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 154
Gleichwohl verliert das Verfassungsrecht momentan an orientierender Kraft.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 160
unit 164
Ausblick.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 166
[18] Der religiös-weltanschauliche Frieden war gesichert.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 168
[19] Wechselseitige Übergriffigkeiten zwischen Religion und Politik waren die Ausnahme.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 169
Die Bürgerinnen und Bürger pflegten untereinander zivilitätssichernde Toleranz.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 170
unit 173
Fußnoten 1 Zu diesen Einflüssen etwa in jüngster Zeit Hans Michael Heinig, Prekäre Ordnungen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 174
unit 175
Religion in der säkularen Moderne, München 2018, S.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 176
63ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 179
und zum Protestantismus Hans Michael Heinig, Säkularer Staat, viele Religionen, Freiburg/Br.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 180
2018, S. 81ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 181
3 Vgl.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 183
4 Die einzelnen Maßnahmen sind dokumentiert in Ernst-Rudolf Huber/Wolfgang Huber (Hrsg.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 184
), Staat und Kirche im 19. und 20.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 185
Jahrhundert, Bd.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 186
2, Darmstadt 1976, S. 395ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 187
unit 188
), Bonner Kommentar zum Grundgesetz, Heidelberg 2010, Art.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 189
140 Rn.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 190
1ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 191
Siehe auch den Beitrag von Thomas Großbölting in dieser Ausgabe (Anm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 192
d.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 193
Red.).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 194
6 Siehe auch den Beitrag von Gert Pickel in dieser Ausgabe (Anm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 195
d.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 196
Red.).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 198
d.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 199
Red.).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 201
4, Rn.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 202
21.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 203
unit 204
10 BVerfGE 138, 296ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 205
; BVerfGE 108, 282ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 206
Zu beiden Entscheidungen etwa Heinig (Anm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 207
2), S.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 208
17f., S. 109ff.. 11 BVerfGE 108, S. 282 (301, 303).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 209
12 BVerfGE 138, 296ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 210
13 Zu Gehalt und Grenzen des Grundsatzes vgl.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 211
Heinig (Anm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 212
2), S.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 213
12ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 214
; mit etwas anderem Akzent Dreier (Anm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 215
1), S. 95ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 216
14 BVerfGE 138, 296 (340).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 217
15 BVerfGE 93, 1 (20).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 219
Vgl.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 220
Bundesverfassungsgericht, Neue Zeitschrift für Verwaltungsrecht 1999, S. 757ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 221
17 Siehe auch den Beitrag von Friedrich Wilhelm Graf in dieser Ausgabe (Anm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 222
d.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 223
Red.)
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 224
18 Vgl.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 226
), Konfessionsfreie und Grundgesetz, Aschaffenburg 2010, S. 13–28, hier S. 13ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 227
19 Vgl.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 228
Heinig (Anm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 229
2), S. 27ff.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 230
Dieser Text ist unter der Creative Commons Lizenz veröffentlicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 232
http://www.bpb.de/apuz/272101/historische-und-aktuelle-dynamiken-im-religionsrecht?p=all
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 149  3 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 149  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 137  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 134  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 162  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 38  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 54  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 106  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 111  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 16  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 42  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 45  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 46  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 50  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 153  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 157  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 155  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 136  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 14  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 68  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 131  3 months, 3 weeks ago
3Bn37Arty • 2765  translated  unit 46  3 months, 3 weeks ago
3Bn37Arty • 2765  commented on  unit 17  3 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 28  3 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 26  3 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 92  3 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 27  3 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 43  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 227  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 224  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 223  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 222  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 213  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 212  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 207  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 202  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 201  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 219  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 198  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 195  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 193  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 192  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 190  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 189  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 181  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 176  3 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 164  3 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 53  3 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 86  3 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 85  3 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 19  3 months, 4 weeks ago

Autor: Hans Michael Heinig.

Das Religionsverfassungsrecht in Deutschland ist in hohem Maße historisch geprägt.[1]Wer die Vorgeschichte der religionsrechtlichen Ordnung außer Acht lässt, verkennt am Ende die Herausforderungen der Gegenwart. Der Blick zurück hilft zudem für den nach vorne: Ohne Kenntnis der bisherigen Dynamiken erscheinen die weiteren Perspektiven allzu statisch. Dann wird etwa ausgeblendet, welch langen Weg die Kirchen zurückgelegt haben, bis sie zu den heutigen Stützen einer liberaldemokratischen Verfassungsordnung wurden.[2] Beides verzerrt die Realitäten auf ungute Weise.

Vom Reformations- zum Säkularisierungsfolgenrecht.

Das Religionsrecht in Deutschland ist zunächst einmal "Reformationsfolgenrecht",[3]denn es wurde entscheidend durch die mit der 1517 einsetzenden Reformation einhergehende Kirchenspaltung geprägt: Anders als im Norden und Süden Europas bildeten sich hierzulande zwei gleichstarke Religionsparteien heraus. Der Streit um den wahren Glauben mündete in konfessionellen Bürgerkriegen, denen der Westfälische Frieden 1648 ein Ende setzte. Mit ihm wurde die religiöse Wahrheitsfrage im politischen Raum ein Stück weit suspendiert. Eine Frühform säkularisierter öffentlicher Gewalt entstand – doch nur auf der Ebene des Reiches selbst. Die einzelnen Territorialstaaten folgten zunächst dem Ideal konfessioneller Homogenität: Die Landesherren entschieden über die Religion in ihrem Herrschaftsbereich. In protestantischen Territorien entstand das landesherrliche Kirchenregiment, doch auch in den katholischen Reichsständen kam es zu einem engen Bündnis von Thron und Altar.

Religionsfreiheit und Gleichbehandlung aller Religionen und Weltanschauungen setzten sich erst allmählich durch. Das Allgemeine Landrecht für die Preußischen Staaten von 1794 und der Reichsdeputationshauptschluss von 1803 markieren wichtige Etappen, ebenso die gescheiterte bürgerliche Revolution von 1848 und die anschließend von oben "oktroyierten" Verfassungen. Deren Freiheits- und Gleichheitsrechte waren wenig belastbar, wie insbesondere Bismarcks Kulturkampf gegen die römisch-katholische Kirche zeigte. Dieser setzte alsbald nach der 1871 vom protestantischen Preußen orchestrierten Reichsgründung unter Ausschluss des katholischen Österreichs ein. Der deutsche Katholizismus wurde allen Verfassungsgarantien zum Trotz rabiat verfolgt – ein lange nachwirkendes Trauma.[4].

Mit der Gründung der Weimarer Republik kam es auch religionsverfassungsrechtlich zu einer einschneidenden Zäsur: Das landesherrliche Kirchenregiment fand ein Ende, ebenso jede sonstige Form von Staatskirchentum und Staatsreligion. Die Weimarer Reichsverfassung (WRV) von 1919 garantierte erstmals für ganz Deutschland verfassungsrechtlich die individuelle und korporative Religionsfreiheit und verbot Diskriminierungen aus Gründen der Religion oder Weltanschauung.

Intensiv wurde damals diskutiert, wie das Auseinandertreten von Staat und Kirche gestaltet werden sollte. Man fand einen originellen Kompromiss zwischen den widerstreitenden Interessen: Deutschland sollte nicht den französischen Weg des Laizismus gehen und die Religion aus dem staatlich verfassten öffentlichen Leben verdrängen, sondern die Trennung sollte "schiedlich-friedlich" erfolgen.[5] Punktuell blieben Kooperationen möglich, etwa bei theologischen Fakultäten oder dem konfessionellen Religionsunterricht an öffentlichen Schulen. Auch die öffentlich-rechtliche Rechtsform für Religionsgemeinschaften blieb erhalten und war fortan allen Religionen und Weltanschauungen zugänglich. Man wollte so die Mitgliederbesteuerung als effiziente Finanzierungsform erhalten und die kulturelle Bedeutung des Religiösen unterstreichen. Zudem sah man, dass der Körperschaftsstatus eine Selbstorganisation gemäß dem theologischen Selbstverständnis oftmals besser ermöglicht als das bürgerliche Vereinsrecht.

Die Weimarer Republik scheiterte so frühzeitig, dass sich die Religionsbestimmungen ihrer Verfassung im demokratischen Alltag nicht richtig bewähren konnten. Erst in der Bonner Republik ließ sich im Detail durchbuchstabieren, was die 1919 vollzogene Trennung von Staat und Kirche bedeutet – nun vor dem Hintergrund des Zivilisationsbruchs durch den NS-Staat, der eine mörderische Religionspolitik betrieben hatte.

Unveränderter Textbestand, veränderte Gesellschaft.

Der Parlamentarische Rat übernahm 1949 die wesentlichen Bestimmungen des Weimarer Religionskompromisses in das Grundgesetz (GG). Das Grundrecht der Religionsfreiheit wurde allerdings, anders als in Art. 135 WRV, in Art. 4 Abs. 1 und 2 GG ohne Gesetzesvorbehalt neu gefasst. Nur Verfassungsrechte Dritter und Gemeinwohlbelange mit Verfassungsrang sollten Einschränkungen der Religionsfreiheit rechtfertigen. Der Textbestand des Religionsverfassungsrechts blieb bis heute unverändert, wird also 2019 hundert Jahre alt. Doch die Religionsempirie hat sich erheblich verändert. Waren 1949 noch nahezu alle Bürgerinnen und Bürger Mitglied in einer der beiden großen christlichen Kirchen, setzten ab den 1960er Jahren zunehmend Säkularisierungs-, Individualisierungs- und Pluralisierungsprozesse ein. Im urbanen Raum und Ostdeutschland stellen diejenigen, die nicht religiös oder weltanschaulich organisiert sind, inzwischen oft die Mehrheit. Zudem veränderte Migration die Zusammensetzung der religiösen Zugehörigkeiten in Deutschland erheblich.[6].

Dieser Wandel von einer bikonfessionellen zur multi-, diffus- und nichtreligiösen Gesellschaft spiegelt sich auch in der Rechtspraxis wider. Unmittelbar nach der Gründung der Bundesrepublik hatte sich zunächst eine äußerst kirchenfreundliche Lesart des Grundgesetzes etabliert: Staat und Kirchen galten als Ordnungsmächte auf Augenhöhe, den Kirchen wurde quasi eigene Souveränität zugestanden. Der Ansatz stieß schnell auf Kritik, und das Bundesverfassungsgericht erteilte ihm schließlich eine Absage: Alle Religionsgemeinschaften seien selbstverständlich der staatlichen Rechtsordnung unterworfen und zugleich durch diese in ihrer Freiheit geschützt.

Nach und nach wandelten sich die den verfassungsgerichtlichen Entscheidungen zugrundeliegenden Sachverhalte, wie sich auch die Gesellschaft in Religionsdingen veränderte. Ging es anfänglich eher um den Minderheitenschutz in einer christlich geprägten Gesellschaft, waren in jüngerer Zeit etwa der islamische Religionsunterricht, Ladenöffnungen an Adventssonntagen, der Körperschaftsstatus für die Bahai oder die Verteilung von Landesleistungen zwischen unterschiedlichen jüdischen Gemeindeverbänden Gegenstand juristischer Auseinandersetzungen.

Lange Zeit herrschte in der Bundesrepublik ein breiter Konsens darüber, wie die Leitlinien des Grundgesetzes zu verstehen sind: Ungleichbehandlungen zwischen Religionen und Weltanschauungen sind nur eingeschränkt bei Vorliegen sachlicher Gründe zulässig. Religion ist nicht nur Privatsache, sondern kann von den Bürgerinnen und Bürgern in die staatliche Sphäre hineingetragen werden. Der Staat hat aber keine eigene religiöse Identität. Er darf sich nicht mit einer bestimmten Religion oder Weltanschauung identifizieren. Abgesehen von den in der Verfassung geregelten Ausnahmen gilt der Grundsatz, dass Religionsgemeinschaften keine staatlichen Aufgaben wahrnehmen sollen und der Staat keine religiösen Aufgaben übernimmt. Doch der religiös-weltanschaulich neutrale Staat muss als Kultur- und Sozialstaat nicht gänzlich religionsblind agieren. Er kann etwa Diakonie und Caritas als Leistungserbringer berücksichtigen und darf sich für gesellschaftliche Wirkungen von Religionskulturen interessieren. Er kann den freien Zusammenschluss religiöser Bürgerinnen und Bürger fördern, so wie er auch sportliche oder künstlerische Aktivitäten unterstützt. Er darf auf die kulturellen Prägekräfte des Religiösen hinweisen, etwa im Schulunterricht.[7].

Gerade im schulischen Bereich zeigt sich aber auch, wie stark sich die Gesellschaft in religiös-weltanschaulichen Fragen verändert hat. Exemplarisch steht dafür der Streit um das Kopftuch der Lehrerin. Er bietet zugleich Anschauungsmaterial, wie das Grundrecht der Religionsfreiheit "praktisch funktioniert".

Kopftuch, Kreuz und Kippa: Religionsfreiheit in der Praxis.

In der religionsoffenen, kooperativen Tradition des deutschen Religionsrechts hätte ein gelassen-toleranter Umgang mit religiös bedingten Kleidungsformen in der Schule nahegelegen. Doch seit Ende der 1990er Jahre wird in Deutschland intensiv und kontrovers über die Frage diskutiert, ob eine Lehrerin in einer öffentlichen Schule aus religiösen Gründen ein Kopftuch tragen darf. Theoretisch geht es in diesen Debatten immer auch um das Kreuz an der Halskette oder um die Kippa als Kopfbedeckung. Doch im Zentrum der Aufmerksamkeit steht das islamische Kopftuch. Die einen begreifen kopftuchtragende Lehrerinnen als Ausdruck von Religionsfreiheit und gleichberechtigter Religionsausübung, gelungener Integration und weiblicher Emanzipation. Andere sehen dagegen einen islamischen Machtanspruch manifestiert und die mühsam errungene emanzipative Geschlechterordnung bedroht.

An dem Beispiel zeigt sich, wie unsere Gesellschaft insgesamt in Anknüpfung an die Erfahrungen der bikonfessionellen Gesellschaft – zuweilen auch in Abkehr von diesen – mal nachdenklich und tastend, mal konfrontativ und in Echokammern verkapselt nach dem richtigen Umgang mit der religiös-weltanschaulichen Vielfalt sucht. Diese Suche erstreckt sich auf Fragen individueller Religionsfreiheit ebenso wie auf korporative Rechte von Religionsgemeinschaften mit Blick auf Religionsunterricht, theologische Fakultäten, Gefängnis- und Militärseelsorge, aber auch als Leistungserbringer im Sozialstaat und als öffentlich-rechtliche Körperschaften eigener Art, die nicht Teil der Staatsverwaltung sind. Übergreifend stellt sich die Frage, wie es mit der Öffentlichkeit von Religion in staatlich verantworteten Sphären der Gesellschaft weitergeht.

Damit Grundrechte ihren Freiheitsschutz effektiv und rational entfalten können, schichtet man in juristischer Betrachtung unterschiedliche Fragenkreise ab: Welches Verhalten und welche Personen werden grundrechtlich generell geschützt (Schutzbereich)? Gibt es im konkreten Fall eine dem Staat zurechenbare Beeinträchtigung dieser Freiheit (Eingriff)? Ist ein solcher Grundrechtseingriff durch das Grundgesetz legitimiert (verfassungsrechtliche Rechtfertigung)?

Glaubens- und Handlungsfreiheit.

Im Schutzbereich der Religionsfreiheit soll sich der Einzelne in seiner religiösen und weltanschaulichen Orientierung frei entfalten können. Die in Art. 4 Abs. 1 und 2 GG genannten Merkmale des Glaubens, Bekenntnisses und der Religionsausübung sind in ihrem Sinnzusammenhang zu verstehen. Religionsfreiheit meint dann die "Freiheit, einen Glauben zu haben oder keinen zu haben, einen Glauben anzunehmen oder abzulehnen, seinen Glauben zu behalten oder aufzugeben, ihn zu bekennen oder nicht zu bekennen, eine bestimmte Handlung aus religiösen Motiven zu tun oder aus religiösen Motiven zu unterlassen oder sein Handeln von jeder religiösen Motivation freizuhalten".[8] In der Konsequenz ist die Religionsfreiheit weit zu verstehen als "das Recht des Einzelnen, sein gesamtes Verhalten an den Lehren seines Glaubens auszurichten und seiner inneren Glaubensüberzeugung gemäß zu handeln".[9].

Der Einzelne muss plausibel vermitteln können, dass sein Verhalten religiös motiviert ist. Dabei kommt es nicht darauf an, ob religiöse Autoritäten ein bestimmtes Tun oder Unterlassen für zwingend geboten halten. Die Religionsfreiheit ist nicht darauf beschränkt, autoritativen Lehrmeinungen zu folgen. Individuelle religiös-weltanschauliche Selbstbestimmung meint gerade, sich eine eigene Überzeugung bilden zu dürfen. Beim Kopftuch ist es deshalb unerheblich, dass unter Muslimen umstritten ist, welche Bekleidungsformen die islamische Überlieferung fordert.

Auch der in politischen Debatten zuweilen zu hörende Vorhalt, der Islam sei eine politische Ideologie und keine Religion, muss für die Frage, was vom Schutzbereich des Art. 4 GG erfasst wird, unbeachtet bleiben. Religionsfreiheit in vollem Sinne kann der Staat nur gewähren, wenn er sich selbst für theologisch inkompetent erklärt und auf die religiöse Wahrheitsfrage keine eigenen Antworten zu geben sucht. In der Praxis gibt es immer wieder Grenzfälle, wenn zu entscheiden ist, ob etwas als "Religion" im Rechtssinne gelten kann – beispielsweise wenn Religionskritiker sich als Anhänger eines fliegenden Spaghettimonsters gerieren. In Bezug auf den Islam lässt sich aber nicht ernsthaft bezweifeln, dass dieser eine Weltreligion mit jahrhundertelanger Tradition darstellt. Er zeichnet sich durch für Religionen typische soziale Funktionen, kulturelle Praktiken und sprachliche Eigenarten aus. Deshalb fällt das in der islamischen Glaubenstradition stehende Verhalten unzweifelhaft in den Schutzbereich der Religionsfreiheit. Rechte Dritter und Belange des Gemeinwohls bleiben hingegen bei der Schutzbereichsbestimmung unberücksichtigt. Sie spielen im modernen Grundrechtsdenken erst auf der Ebene der Rechtfertigung von Freiheitsbeeinträchtigungen eine Rolle, da im liberalen Rechtsstaat nicht der Freiheitsgebrauch, sondern seine staatliche Einschränkung begründet werden muss.

Dieses Modell zur Bestimmung des Schutzbereichs der Religionsfreiheit hat sich noch unter Bedingungen des Bikonfessionalismus in den 1960er Jahren ausgebildet, behält aber auch unter veränderten gesellschaftlichen Umständen seine Gültigkeit. Es gibt zwar immer wieder Vorschläge, den Schutzbereich restriktiver zu fassen. Doch wer die Religionsfreiheit auf Gottesdienste und Gebete oder auf die Befolgung amtlicher kirchlicher Lehrmeinungen beschränken will, verfehlt die eigentliche Pointe der Religionsfreiheit, nämlich den Schutz individueller religiös-weltanschaulicher Selbstbestimmung, aus der sich Rechte der Religionsgemeinschaften letztlich ableiten.

Rechtfertigung staatlicher Freiheitsbeschränkung.

Der Parlamentarische Rat entschied sich 1949 bewusst dagegen, einen Gesetzesvorbehalt für die Religionsfreiheit aufzunehmen. Der Gesetzgeber sollte das Grundrecht nicht für beliebige politische Zwecke einschränken dürfen, sondern nur, soweit das unter Wahrung der Verhältnismäßigkeit zur Sicherung der Rechte Dritter oder sonstiger Gemeinwohlbelange mit Verfassungsrang erforderlich ist. Kollidierende Rechte müssen zu einem möglichst schonenden Ausgleich gebracht werden. Wann ein Recht Dritter der Religionsfreiheit entgegensteht und wie genau ein angemessener Rechtsgüterausgleich aussieht, ist nicht immer einfach zu bestimmen. Fachleute sind in diesen Detailfragen selten einer Meinung.

Im Falle des Kopftuchs einer Lehrerin ging der Dissens so weit, dass der Erste und der Zweite Senat des Bundesverfassungsgerichts sich widersprechende Entscheidungen trafen.[10] Der Zweite Senat sah 2003 in der Religionsfreiheit der Schülerinnen und Schüler sowie im religiösen Erziehungsrecht der Eltern der Religionsfreiheit des Lehrpersonals potenziell entgegenstehende Rechte Dritter.[11] Daneben bemühte er die staatliche Schulaufsicht (Art. 7 Abs. 1 GG), die auch den Schulfrieden als Integrations- und Funktionsvoraussetzung für die Beschulung umfasst. Da größere religiöse Vielfalt mit einer größeren Konfliktträchtigkeit einhergehe, sei möglicherweise eine distanzierendere Trennung von Staat und Religion geboten, als sie traditionell in Deutschland gepflegt wird. Jedenfalls erzeuge religiös konnotierte Bekleidung bei Lehrerinnen und Lehrern eine "abstrakte Gefahr" für den Schulfrieden. Deshalb könne der Gesetzgeber solche verbieten.

Der Erste Senat widersprach 2015.[12] Religiös geprägte Kleidung wie das islamische Kopftuch sei eine Alltagserscheinung. Da die Religionsfreiheit nicht vor der Konfrontation mit religiös-weltanschaulichen Überzeugungen anderer schütze, seien die Religionsfreiheit der Schülerinnen und Schüler sowie das religiöse Erziehungsrecht der Eltern nicht substanziell beeinträchtigt. Zudem reiche eine abstrakte Gefahr für den Schulfrieden nicht aus, um vom Lehrpersonal neutral gehaltene Kleidung zu verlangen. Entscheidend seien die konkreten Umstände vor Ort oder zumindest im Schulbezirk. Ein pauschales Verbot sei unverhältnismäßig.

Einig war man sich im Bundesverfassungsgericht hingegen darin, wie mit der Vieldeutigkeit des "Symbols" Kopftuch umzugehen ist. Das Gericht machte sich die in der Gesellschaft teils verbreitete Überzeugung, das islamische Kopftuch sei Ausdruck einer emanzipationsfeindlichen Grundhaltung, nicht zu eigen. Solche Deutungen gebe es zwar und sie trügen zur Konfliktträchtigkeit des Kopftuchs bei. Doch sie überlagerten nicht einfach die grundrechtlich geschützte religiöse Intention der Kopftuchträgerin.

Aufschlussreich sind auch die Aussagen beider Senate zu der Frage, ob religiös geprägte Kleidung von Staatsbediensteten einen Verstoß gegen die Verpflichtung zur religiös-weltanschaulichen Neutralität darstellt. Dieser Grundsatz wird im Grundgesetz nicht ausdrücklich erwähnt, sondern der Religionsfreiheit, den religionsbezogenen Gleichheitsgarantien (Art. 3 Abs. 3 GG, Art. 33 Abs. 3 GG, Art. 140 GG in Verbindung mit Art. 136 Abs. 1 und 2 WRV) sowie dem Verbot der Staatskirche (Art. 140 GG in Verbindung mit Art. 137 Abs. 1 WRV) in einer Zusammenschau entnommen.[13] Bei religiös geprägter Bekleidung wie einer Kippa oder einem Kopftuch sei allen bewusst, dass diese nur individuelle Überzeugungen der Lehrpersonen zum Ausdruck bringe, die sich der Staat als Ganzer nicht zu eigen mache, so das Bundesverfassungsgericht.

Damit unterscheidet sich das Kopftuch der Lehrerin in einem entscheidenden Punkt vom auf staatliche Anordnung aufgehängten Kreuz im Klassenzimmer, das die Gemüter 1995 bewegte. Damals verwarf das Bundesverfassungsgericht eine Bestimmung im bayerischen Schulgesetz, nach der in jedem Klassenzimmer ein Kreuz aufzuhängen war. Das Gericht hob später ausdrücklich die Unterschiede zwischen dem Kopftuch der Lehrerin und dem Kreuz im Klassenzimmer hervor.[14] Während im staatlichen Anbringungsbefehl zugleich zum Ausdruck komme, dass die durch das Kreuz symbolisierten Glaubensgehalte "vorbildhaft und befolgungswürdig" sind,[15] habe religiös geprägte Kleidung einzelner Lehrpersonen für sich keine solche appellative Wirkung. Im Kruzifix-Beschluss 1995 betonte das Verfassungsgericht zudem, dass man das Kreuz keineswegs auf die vom Christentum geprägte abendländische Kultur reduzieren könne. Der religiös-weltanschaulich neutrale Staat dürfe zwar christliche Bezüge im öffentlichen Schulwesen zulassen, doch müsse er dabei Zwang so weit wie möglich ausschließen. So dürfen etwa Schulgebete und -gottesdienste nur veranstaltet werden, wenn die Teilnahme freiwillig ist. Ebenso sind Schulkreuze im Zweifel abzuhängen.[16].

Zunehmende Konsistenzprobleme als Ausdruck gesellschaftlicher Verlegenheit.

Jede der drei skizzierten Leitentscheidungen ist für sich nachvollziehbar begründet. Doch zusammengenommen sind sie über den engen Kreis von Rechtsexperten hinaus nicht einfach zu vermitteln. Mal soll das Grundgesetz ein allgemeines gesetzliches Verbot religiöser Bekleidung von Staatsbediensteten ermöglichen (so die Entscheidung 2003), dann wieder doch nicht (so 2015). Das auf staatliche Veranlassung hin aufgehängte Kreuz im Klassenzimmer muss bei Widerspruch von Schülern und Eltern weichen, das Kopftuch der Lehrerin hingegen, folgt man der Entscheidung von 2015, nur bei konkreter Störung des Schulfriedens. Der Staat darf zwar "christliche Gemeinschaftsschulen" betreiben, aber für diese kein verpflichtendes Kreuz im Klassenzimmer vorsehen (so 1995).

Rechtstechnisch lassen sich diese Ergebnisse jeweils nachvollziehen, und doch entsteht auf das Ganze gesehen der Eindruck mangelnder Konsistenz. Nun ist es wohlfeil, vom Verfassungsgericht zu verlangen, seine Entscheidungen besser aufeinander abzustimmen. Tatsächlich ist das Gericht immer auch den Strömungen der Zeit ausgesetzt. Der Islam in seinen vielen Facetten stößt gegenwärtig auf teils pauschale, ja hasserfüllte, teils differenzierte gesellschaftliche Vorbehalte. Zugleich erscheint eine Privilegierung des christlichen Glaubens oder der christlichen Kirchen mehrheitlich nicht akzeptabel. Hinzu tritt der fortschreitende Trend zu säkularen Seinsdeutungen. Diese Gemengelage löst seit einiger Zeit verstärkt laizistische Tendenzen aus, die gegenläufig zur verfassungsrechtlichen Intention und Tradition in Deutschland stehen.

Angesichts der etwa in Frankreich gemachten Erfahrungen ist zu bezweifeln, dass Deutschland mit einem radikalen Systemwechsel im Religionsverfassungsrecht gut beraten wäre. Gleichwohl verliert das Verfassungsrecht momentan an orientierender Kraft. Niemand vermag etwa auf der Grundlage der bislang entschiedenen Fälle verlässlich zu prognostizieren, wie das Bundesverfassungsgericht demnächst über das Kopftuch von Staatsanwältinnen und Richterinnen entscheiden wird. Im politischen Raum wurde jüngst gar diskutiert, ob nicht Kindern vor Erreichen der Religionsmündigkeit per se das Tragen religiös geprägter Kleidung verboten werden soll. Weil die Verfassungswidrigkeit eines solchen Verbotes allen evident gewesen wäre, hätte es solch eine Debatte noch vor zehn Jahren nicht gegeben. Es scheint nur noch eine Frage der Zeit zu sein, bis auch die Weihnachtskrippe auf dem städtischen Marktplatz und der Weihnachtsbaum vor dem Bundeskanzleramt infrage gestellt werden.

Gegen solche Tendenzen wollte jüngst die Bayerische Staatsregierung ein Zeichen setzen und beschloss, dass in jeder Landesbehörde ein Kreuz im Eingangsbereich aufzuhängen sei. Der Beschluss stieß auf massive Kritik, auch aus den Reihen der Kirchen und der akademischen Theologie.[17] Demonstrierten bayerische Politiker und Bischöfe in München 1995 noch gemeinsam gegen den Kruzifix-Beschluss des Bundesverfassungsgerichts, ergab sich 2018 eine ganz neue Frontstellung: Kirchlicherseits witterte man eine Instrumentalisierung des Zentralsymbols des Christentums für Wahlkampfzwecke und zeigte sich ob seiner Profanisierung besorgt, da das Kreuz in einer Behörde des religiös-weltanschaulich neutralen Staates von Rechts wegen seines religiös-theologischen Sinngehaltes entkleidet werde. So löste eine Geste, die wertkonservative und kirchlich gebundene Wählerinnen und Wähler ansprechen sollte, am Ende allenthalben Irritationen aus, bei entschieden Säkularen, religiös Indifferenten, Muslimen und Juden, aber eben auch bei Christen. Im Kontrast zu 1995 zeigt sich abermals, wie weit fortgeschritten die Erosion alter bundesrepublikanischer Selbstverständlichkeiten in Fragen der religiös-weltanschaulichen Ordnung ist, selbst in Bayern.

Ausblick.

Viele Fachleute betonen, dass Deutschland in der Vergangenheit mit seinem Religionsverfassungsrecht auf das Ganze gesehen gute Erfahrungen gemacht hat.[18] Der religiös-weltanschauliche Frieden war gesichert. Die allen Religionen eigenen destruktiven Potenziale wurden eingehegt, ihre sozialproduktiven Kräfte stimuliert.[19] Wechselseitige Übergriffigkeiten zwischen Religion und Politik waren die Ausnahme. Die Bürgerinnen und Bürger pflegten untereinander zivilitätssichernde Toleranz.

Freilich kann selbst der klügste Verfassungstext seine eigene praktische Wirksamkeit nicht garantieren. In Zukunft wird das auf gleiche Freiheit, kooperative Trennung und Öffentlichkeit angelegte Religionsverfassungsrecht seine integrierenden Wirkungen nur weiter entfalten, wenn auch die maßgeblichen gesellschaftlichen Gruppen hinreichend entgegenkommende Lebenshaltungen ausbilden. Die weitere Dynamik wird deshalb vor allem davon abhängen, ob ein nachhaltiger Interessenausgleich zwischen säkular und religiös gesonnenen Bürgerinnen und Bürgern gelingt; die Gesellschaft insgesamt besser lernt, von einzelnen Religionskulturen ernsthaft ausgehende Gefahren für das Gemeinwohl von bloßen kulturellen Fremdheitserfahrungen zu unterscheiden; die gesellschaftlich maßgeblichen Religionskulturen glaubwürdig darstellen können, dass sie mit einer liberaldemokratischen Gesellschaftsordnung verträglich sind; hinzukommende institutionelle Akteure mit den ungeschriebenen Spielregeln des deutschen Neokorporatismus elegant umzugehen wissen; und ob Zugewanderte sich eine ihnen fremde Geschichte, zu der auch die Religions(rechts)geschichte gehört, als ihre zu eigen machen und als solche weiterschreiben.

Fußnoten

1 Zu diesen Einflüssen etwa in jüngster Zeit Hans Michael Heinig, Prekäre Ordnungen. Historische Prägungen des Religionsrechts in Deutschland, Tübingen 2018; Horst Dreier, Staat ohne Gott. Religion in der säkularen Moderne, München 2018, S. 63ff.; Christoph Schönberger, Etappen des deutschen Religionsrechts von der Reformation bis heute, in: Zeitschrift für evangelisches Kirchenrecht 4/2017, S. 333–347, mit Kommentaren von Stefan Korioth (ebd., S. 348–353) und Olivier Beaud (ebd., S. 354–361); Hendrik Munsonius, Öffentliche Religion im säkularen Staat, Heidelberg 2016, S. 11ff.

2 Zum Katholizismus etwa Christian Waldhoff, Katholizismus und Verfassungsstaat, in: Jahres- und Tagungsbericht der Görres-Gesellschaft 2010, Bonn 2011, S. 43ff. und zum Protestantismus Hans Michael Heinig, Säkularer Staat, viele Religionen, Freiburg/Br. 2018, S. 81ff.

3 Vgl. Christian Walter, Reformationsfolgen, Säkularisierungsfolgen, Pluralisierungsfolgen, in: Zeitschrift für evangelisches Kirchenrecht 4/2017, S. 395–414.

4 Die einzelnen Maßnahmen sind dokumentiert in Ernst-Rudolf Huber/Wolfgang Huber (Hrsg.), Staat und Kirche im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert, Bd. 2, Darmstadt 1976, S. 395ff.

5 Im Überblick etwa Karl-Hermann Kästner, in: Wolfgang Kahl/Christian Waldhoff/Christian Walter (Hrsg.), Bonner Kommentar zum Grundgesetz, Heidelberg 2010, Art. 140 Rn. 1ff. Siehe auch den Beitrag von Thomas Großbölting in dieser Ausgabe (Anm. d. Red.).

6 Siehe auch den Beitrag von Gert Pickel in dieser Ausgabe (Anm. d. Red.).

7 Zum schulischen Religionsunterricht siehe auch den Beitrag von Riem Spielhaus und Zrinka Štimac in dieser Ausgabe (Anm. d. Red.).

8 Michael Germann, in: Volker Epping/Christian Hillgruber, Beck’scher Online-Kommentar Grundgesetz, München 2016, Art. 4, Rn. 21.

9 Entscheidungen des Bundesverfassungsgerichts (BVerfGE) 108, S. 282 (297); ständige Rechtsprechung.

10 BVerfGE 138, 296ff.; BVerfGE 108, 282ff. Zu beiden Entscheidungen etwa Heinig (Anm. 2), S. 17f., S. 109ff..

11 BVerfGE 108, S. 282 (301, 303).

12 BVerfGE 138, 296ff.

13 Zu Gehalt und Grenzen des Grundsatzes vgl. Heinig (Anm. 2), S. 12ff.; mit etwas anderem Akzent Dreier (Anm. 1), S. 95ff.

14 BVerfGE 138, 296 (340).

15 BVerfGE 93, 1 (20).

16 Die in Reaktion auf den Kruzifix-Beschluss eingeführte Widerspruchslösung hat das Bundesverfassungsgericht in der Folge nicht beanstandet. Vgl. Bundesverfassungsgericht, Neue Zeitschrift für Verwaltungsrecht 1999, S. 757ff.

17 Siehe auch den Beitrag von Friedrich Wilhelm Graf in dieser Ausgabe (Anm. d. Red.)

18 Vgl. etwa Christian Waldhoff, Neue Religionskonflikte und staatliche Neutralität, München 2010; Christoph Möllers, Religiöse Freiheit als Gefahr?, in: Veröffentlichungen der Vereinigung deutscher Staatsrechtslehrer 68/2009, S. 47–93, hier S. 87; Stefan Korioth, Reform des deutschen Religionsrechts?, in: Horst Groschopp (Hrsg.), Konfessionsfreie und Grundgesetz, Aschaffenburg 2010, S. 13–28, hier S. 13ff.

19 Vgl. Heinig (Anm. 2), S. 27ff.

Dieser Text ist unter der Creative Commons Lizenz veröffentlicht. by-nc-nd/3.0/ Der Name des Autors/Rechteinhabers soll wie folgt genannt werden: by-nc-nd/3.0/

Autor: Hans Michael Heinig für Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte/bpb.de
Urheberrechtliche Angaben zu Bildern / Grafiken / Videos finden sich direkt bei den Abbildungen.

http://www.bpb.de/apuz/272101/historische-und-aktuelle-dynamiken-im-religionsrecht?p=all