de-en  Der Deutsche Lausbub in Amerika - Zweiter Teil - Kapitel 3
News service.

What the American demands from his newspaper. - The scoop. - The shipwreck of the steamer Hong Kong. - The men of quick decisions. How a reporter's piece is staged. - Hunting for the sensation. - In the machinery room. - How I exercised the art of listening. - The Daemon in the Steel. - Newspaper's tycoon Hearst. - An anecdote about the yellow peril of the Emperor and Hearst's Yellow Press. - A black day.
The life of the American is hustle and bustle, not out of vital need in the chase after the dollar, but because hustling and bustling is nothing whatsoever complain about from childhood on, but something wonderful instead. Hustle! is his motto - get moving, get excited, utilize the time! And he also demands hustling from his newspaper. The man, for whom huge skyscrapers, thundering street noise, pursuing haste in the cityscape are a kind of cultural need, demands a lot of noise and enormous spectacle from his newspaper and the gaudy colors that his eye sees everywhere in daily life. The headlines must be two inches high and peppered with powerful words, just as is his own way of expression; exaggerated, as he likes to exaggerate, the man who calls his country the land of God, instead of speaking of the fatherland like other folk. He also wants to see in his newspaper the haste, the quick decision, the fast work that rumbles in his personal life. He is impressed by the picture, the deed, the great description, the astounding; he only wants to enjoy words of wisdom occasionally and then with caution! The roaring life must flow past his inner ear as he flies over the newspaper in the soft cushions of New York's elevated railway so that his reading rings in harmony with the beat of his day. This is how the American newspaper was born out of the bustling American and his love for bright lights and loud noises.
Their pursuit of the dollar, their agitation, their drive for sensationalism.
But if you look closer and rummage through the blatant bric-a-brac of words in the headlines and the empty phrases in the essays, you will be surprised to discover that behind this brutal sensation lies a thorough, honest, admirable work of quite enormous proportions, often precisely where the reporter, who is so recklessly disreputed, has worked. This reporter virtually represents the best youthful strength and enterprise and diligence of the land of the dollar. It is he who must give his newspaper the great successes that are called scoops in the newspaper language. They alone make an impression on the modern American: they alone ensure the paper a rapid upsurge of circulation, a respectable growth.
Scoop means literally a big shovel. To scoop in means collecting, shoveling, bagging and, figuratively speaking, the sarcastic newspaper expression implies: That you have shoveled in a highly important piece of news all to yourself, first and foremost, while the distressed competition stands there wistfully and searches the bare ground twenty-four hours later for shabby remains. I experienced a brillant scoop at the Examiner. And helped do it.
+++ It was early in the morning. Work had not yet begun and the reporter family was scattered across the city hunting for the events of the day when McGrady's phone, which was only switched on by Examiner Central when there was a very important message, rang. Mac picked up the receiver: "Examiner - News service." Yes - lighthouse keeper - Golden Gate station - yes - what is the name of the steamer - Hong Kong? - so it is! Looks like an accident, yes, indeedy. Being towed in by a tramp steamer?" Break, long break. All of us were anxiously listening breathlessly ... Then Mac kept asking: "The steamer is only visible through a good telescope?"+++ "Did you give the message to another newspaper? - No? - All right. Only report to the authorities as required by law and do not notify any other newspaper. Yes? Thanks! You will receive twenty-five dollars from us. - That's enough." The phone faded away.
Allan McGrady slowly and deliberately hung up the phone, went to his desk, grabbed a cigarette and lit it awkwardly while we stood there in silence. Then he turned around.
"Hayes! How about phoning the tugboat company, please. We need the fastest tugboat they have. Must be underway in a half hour. Examiner news service, the usual charter for one day. No - wait. We need two tugs, not one." "Two tugs - in half an hour!" Hayes repeated.
"Right." Hayes went to the phone and McGrady rang. "I'm requesting Mr. Lascelles," he ordered the incoming pageboy.
None of us said a word, for everyone knew that it was something great being bargained for; quick thinking, quick planning. That every minute and every sentence spoken was precious. The editor-in-chief came immediately. If one editor "asked" the other or even the boss instead of trying to do it himself, that meant: hurry. Urgent, express! The two gentlemen shook hands.
"Good morning, Lascelles," said McGrady, who never spoke calmer and cooler than when he was very excited. "Forgive me, but we have a matter here that cannot be deferred." Lascelles just nodded. McGrady continued: "The lighthouse keeper from the Golden Gate Station telephoned that he had just spotted the Hong Kong steamer of the San Francisco-China line. The steamer is being towed in by a small Honolulu tramp steamer. They all know that Hong Kong is overdue. However, it is not yet possible to say what the circumstances are. Mr. Lascelles, I ordered two tugboats - "Why two?" "We're in a hurry. I would suggest that we make the afternoon issue appear two hours earlier, with twelve to twenty columns Hong Kong at the top. Personally, I am in favor of throwing all the other local news out. Only the Hong Kong, important politics, stock market, miscellany. In two hours at the earliest, the "Call" will have the message from the authorities, but in any case after us. Even if it's only an hour or even half an hour difference, we still have a head start, and the people from the Call certainly don't think that we could publish two hours earlier!" "But the hell we can't, Mac!" "I mean, it would just have to go," Allan McGrady said thoughtfully. "We'll get the typesetters and machine men from the night shift. As far as manuscripts are concerned, the second tugboat is to transmit the first news as soon as possible, and the rest must be there in the blink of an eye - I can rely on my people." (It was very rare for McGrady to say the same thing, but if it had happened, we would have let ourselves be torn to pieces for him!!)
"The possibility of success is there," Lascelles replied quickly. » Allright, Mac. Make arrangements. You know we risk a good thousand dollars extra expenses, and the old man will give us hell if things go wrong. Early edition then. Do you know what? It's half past nine. At twelve o'clock, or let's say twelve-thirty, let's distribute an extra: The Hong Kong is being helplessly towed. One of the largest ships of the Californian China line narrowly escaped sinking. A tragedy at sea. See the first report in the Afternoon Examiner. Or something like that ..." "Excellent!" said McGrady. "If we get a hold of the port, it'll be a big deal. Gentlemen, the entire crew will be on the tugboat except Hayes. Hayes - do not cry, you have difficult and responsible work enough; you must work on the Frisco China line and to the insurance companies. I can hardly give you orders, gentlemen. Ferguson, the eldest, will make arrangements. In general, we will use the natural method. ... The events are to be shown photographically. ... The description begins from the moment you board the tugboat. Ferguson will take over this first part. Rushing ride and so on. The Hong Kong is sighted - description, please, how the box looks like - you climb on board" - (he laughed) "and if one of the gentlemen should fall into the water, it would be a nice thing - "Roaring laughter.
"- and if one of the gentlemen would be kind enough to drown in service of the Examiner, it would be even nicer from the newspaper's point of view!" (That was Mac's creepy kind of humor.) "Hence describe the passengers - and interview them - interview the captain, officers - see what's going on - if the captain balks, rub his nose in it that the Examiner and the public will not be bluffed - the truth comes to light after all. Let's go, Gentlemen! I ask that you work fast and don't waste time on stylistic arts while writing on your way home. The necessary management of the details will be done by Lascelles and also me in the editorial team. Get going!" "One moment!" Lascelles called out. "Take newspapers with you! It's good advertisement. 1 Passengers will be happy to see another newspaper from the land of God in sixteen days!" One minute later, ten newspapermen rushed in a hurry to the harbor, and twenty-five minutes later were pursuing in the deep-sea tugs, Furor and Golden Gate, in a rushing ride through the bustle of shipping in the inner bay of the Golden Gate. The flags of the newspaper fluttered on the flagpoles at the stern with their bright red inscription on a white background: San Francisco Examiner. The speed of the craft was much too fast for the inner bay. but the Examiner was allowed to risk a small violation of the law with its connections with the port police. The ships we were meeting came to our attention, and more than once, questions came to us over a blaring megaphone about what in the devil's name was actually going on. Our captain usually answered: "Ask the next policeman!" Or fiercer: "Are - in a hurry - have - - no time - - to lie to you! Auf Wiedersehen! Alcatraz Island, the tiny, cannon-filled rock island in the center of the harbor, scurried past; the narrow bay became wider, the waves went higher. The sea of houses vanished in the haze. The flotillas of fishing boats in the Outer Bay were soon overtaken. ... The naked, rocky shores moved closer together.
We steamed through Golden Gate. Crouched on a deck chair, Ferguson had already started writing. Now he looked up and gave us his instructions, which resulted in an exact work distribution. The description of the engine room was assigned to me while Ferguson himself took on interviewing the chief engineer of the Hongkong. But the blind stroke of luck had given me, the youngest, the inexperienced, a more rewarding task than him ... In a quarter hour, clouds of smoke became visible on the horizon, and shortly afterwards the black mass of a huge vessel appeared, towed by a tiny steamer. It was the Hongkong, overdue for five days.
+++ The electric lamps were glowing in the engine room, but the huge fireholes of the boilers lay gray and liveless there and silence reigned. I arduously climbed on the narrow steel ladders from platform to platform.
"G' morning," said an old, white-haired man in a blue engineer's duster down there. He gleefully peered at me with blinking eyes and slowly pushed the stump of a pipe from the left corner of his mouth to the right while with one hand he was examining by feel the bearing of a roaring dynamo and holding a freshly washed shirt with the other closer to the firebox of the small auxiliary boiler. "Good morning!" " Tell me everything!" I said.
"Newspaper?" "Yeah - Examiner." "Thought so," the oldster grinned. "I am the third engineer of this blessed vessel, and as you can see, I busy myself to create some electical power and to dry the family laundry. Man, there's nothing going on here! Nothing doing. We abandoned the business for lack of working capital. "Go on!" I asked patiently.
"Nothing else." "Broken propeller, I hear, isn't it?" "Propeller shaft is broken, young man, in technical terms." said the old man and turned his family clothes to dry the other side. "That means that roughly in the middle between here and Honolulu on the bottom of the sea at a depth of two thousand to three thousand meters a propeller, a piece of propeller shaft three meters long, about six tail plates with accessories, three quarters of a rudder and still various other trifles are lying, worth all together about eighty thousand pounds or several hundred thousand dollars. That's all" +++ "How did this happen?" He spit out forcefully on the floor. "Young man, I have been an engineer for twenty-seven years and still I know as little as you do. You see, a propeller shaft is so to speak, a bitch! It's a thick, long piece of steel that is checked and inspected by half a dozen engineers and at least three authorities inch by inch before each departure. That we care and cuddle, oil and anoint during the journey, as if it were a baby. It's a piece of steel that has to withstand the force of six thousand horsepower and water resistances of eighteen thousand horsepower on its rounded blades. A piece of steel, on which the forces and the resistances here and there - it doesn't happen often, thank God - become too much. Then it goes snap, and all hell's broken loose!" "What happens then?" "Oh, nothing of any importance." He laughed resoundingly and slapped his knee. " What happened to us, happens. Approximately like what happens when you suddenly cut the tail off of a little cat - the tail falls off, doesn't it, and the little cat behaves unusually lively and excited. Well, our propeller tail with some paraphernalia that it took in passing lies - well, between here and Honolulu. The cat - - " "The engines?" " - "Yes - the engines! - The machines became excited. It's like having four horses tugging at a heavy sand cart with all their might and suddenly all the ropes snapped. Whereupon, the four nags would tumble over one another and thrash about with their legs ... It happened at three o'clock in the morning. It was my watch, hand on the throttle. Three seconds after the big bang I had throttled down, and fifty seconds later I had closed the rear mechanical safety hatch. ... The three seconds, however, were all it took for the machines to tumble over one another - bearings were bulging, high-pressure cylinders were bent, pistons were lopsided as if they were drunk, all connections were loosened, all the screws heave-ho - a shame, young man, a sad shame. Makes you cry! But you do not understand - you are not one of the engineering crowd .." "And then?" "We closed the shop. They let off steam, sealed the collision bulkhead, pumped out the bit of the Pacific Ocean that had penetrated into the engine room, and supported our poor machines with all kinds of beams. Man, just look! The high-pressure cylinder looks like a scaffolding - ugh! We waited for divine providence and the filthy tramp steamer, which earns a huge fortune from us with its bit of towing." "May I see the engine room?" "Come on! You won't believe your eyes! It looks something like a steerage deck with 700 seasick Chinese on the third day of their departure from Hong Kong. ... Com-ple- tely fil-thy! Sighing he hung up a nearly dry shirt over a blank copper pipe and led me to the holiest of holies of the Hongkong. It was an arduous crawl through narrow passageways along and under the bodies of the steel monsters. A tangle of beams supported the individual parts of the giant machines, which had been rendered completely useless by the terrible impact of the unleashed unrestrained forces at the moment of the break; broken, bent tubes, bent rods, crooked steel columns, cracked pieces of hard iron, white-grey at the edges of the break, were lying around.
"Nice, isn't it?" said the old man. "Now imagine please that a tiny, small flaw, a completely invisible, undiscovered crack in a circular, twenty inch diameter piece of steel is enough to wreak havoc with a half million dollar engine within three seconds!" The rascal then decided to give his part of the report the headline: The Demon in the Steel!
He thought, that was very nice!
+++ While the Furor rushed towards the harbor in a cloud of black belching smoke, i wrote and wrote and wrote for it was so very easy. I was fortunate enough to have the most beautiful and exciting thing in a big newspaper event - the grim, gloomy humor of reality ... Our scoop succeeded brilliantly. With blazing headlines and sixteen columns featuring the Hongkong the Examiner was published two hours before the (San Fransisco) Call. In a total of severn hours from receiving the message to the final version of the paper in print, an incident which was incredible interesting for a harbor town had been presented lively and accurately, with a detailed presentation of over three thousand lines. Nothing was missing. The appearance of the Hongkong - the report of the captain - the description of the tugboat's people - the scenes of horror in the tragic night.
It had been one of the great days of the newspaper.
+++ The Hongkong report had, as an abbreviated text, been sent by telegram to New York and Chicago to the New York Journal and the Chicago Dispatch, for we and those two papers always worked hand in hand. Because "we" both were owned by William R. Hearst, the publisher of the New York Journal. When we gathered in the reporters' room the next morning, Mac showed us laughingly a telegram. We read: "Examiner, Frisco. - Compliments, Mac. Good work. Expect detailed report. - Hearst." It was typical for William R. Hearst for whom nothing was too small in the newspaper business not to take care of personally and nothing too big not to dare to tackle it with his newspapers. I didn't see Hearst until years later. But the reporter's room was teeming with anecdotes about the "old man." When Hearst's father, the owner of the New York Journal had died und had left him the newspaper, the insignificant boy, who so far had attracted attention only because of fashionable clothing and loud neckties all at once became a toiler. He told the chief editors and chief managers of his newspaper that he was boss here and nobody else. They found it a real hoot.
Then came horror.
The young Hearst did't even allow himself time to eat - and other people even less so. He didn't need to sleep at all. He was the horror of the typesetters. He spent the night in the typesetting room and dotted the last -i- on the fonts, which were to make the headlines of the individual articles attractive for His Majesty the audience.
His life belonged to his newspaper. The following true little story illustrates his manner perfectly. He gave a dinner that lasted for quite a while. At three in the morning, a messenger brought him the first copy of the morning edition of the Journal, which had just gone to the press. Hearst jumped up angrily after looking at the newspaper, without even giving his astonished guests a word of explanation, and ran out into the night. Gasping for breath, he arrived in the Journal building, stopped the press and telephoned the editor-in-chief.
All because the headline of the Hearst editorial was not catchy enough!
He used to lie stretched out for hours on the carpet in his private office, spreading out the gigantic pages of the Journal in front of him to study the effect of the "presentation". He needed the big impression - for the big masses. That was his idol. He spent vast sums on special wires, rented a private wire between New York and Washington to have Congressional dispatches earlier, won over generals and ministers as co-workers. He beat the New York newspapers again and again in the speed and detail of important news. The success with the large masses occurred almost instantly. The circulation figures of the New York Journal skyrocketed, and one newspaper became a newspaper syndicate in New York, Chicago and San Francisco, with Hearst as sole owner. That's when the phrase "Yellow Press" came into being.
About its origin, I heard the following story told by American newspaper friends: When the German Kaiser dedicated his drawing talent to the yellow danger and warned the nations of Europe to preserve their most sacred goods, the caricaturist of a Washington newspaper came up with the nice idea of polemically exploiting the Kaiser's drawing, which had caused a great stir in America and was met with strong applause in the dislike of the yellow race. In one picture he drew a knife-wielding Chinese, in another picture beside it, Hearst was waving the journal, surrounded by dancing devils, who all shouted: Sensation! Sensation!! Sensation!!! One picture carried the headline: The Yellow Peril of Europe! the other: The Yellow Peril of America! The political world of the United States laughed and called the newspaperman the Yellow Hearst and his newspapers the Yellow Newspapers. The Yellow Press!
However the scathing word picture may have emerged, with its comparison with the crassest of all colors, screaming yellow, it excellently characterizes the hunger for sensation. It's wrong, too, like all catchphrases. Hearst strongly influenced the development of the American press and provided unforgettable services to the modern news service. And a long time ago before Roosevelt, he was fighting against the trusts. His political position as one of the leaders of the Democratic Party is growing stronger from year to year.
+++ Just one single day in those months I neglected the newspaper service.
That was on that day when early in the morning Madame Legrange knocked and brought me a letter, a letter from Germany. I was very pleased. My taciturn father rarely wrote to me, but between the lines of the few letters I could read that my boyish enthusiasm in the service of the newspaper and my naive description of life around me pleased him. In a nutshell, the friend spoke to his friend. Only now and then did a piece of advice flash a warning. "You may never return to Germany, but don't forget your country, because its kind remains your kind!" he once wrote to me. "Life is very hard for you, for you are responsible to no one but yourself...." it was said some other time. Above all, I was amazed by the exact knowledge of the American conditions that spoke from these letters; a far more thorough and deeper knowledge than mine, who lived and worked in the country after all. This gave me immense respect. When the German homesickness came over me, and sometimes it did, the longing and dreams took the form that I dreamed of facing my father again as a successful man. The successful one to the successful one. Friend to friend. The equal to the equal.
And now I read and sat petrified on my bed. My father was dead. Died of a terrible illness, after years of infirmity, which had been concealed from me on his command. They had buried him weeks ago.
On that day of despair I began to sense what being alone in a distant land was in reality and what the bonds of blood meant, but years were to pass before I understood that my very own being lay in the grave in Munich's northern cemetery. ... That my strength, my recklessness and my manner came from my father, and that I owe all the tenacity of desire and will to the man who, as a war-disabled officer after the campaigns of 1866 and 1870, freshly and powerfully conquered a new life and created a rich field of activity as a national economic and intellectual spirit.
unit 1
Reporterdienst.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 2
Was der Amerikaner von seiner Zeitung verlangt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 3
– Der scoop.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 4
– Der verunglückte Dampfer Hongkong.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 5
– Die Männer der schnellen Entschlüsse.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 6
– Wie ein Reporterstück inszeniert wird.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 7
– Auf der Jagd nach der Sensation.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 8
– Im Maschinenraum.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 9
– Wie ich die Kunst des Zuhörens ausübte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 10
– Der Dämon im Stahl.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 11
– Zeitungskönig Hearst.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 12
– Eine Anekdote von der gelben Gefahr des Kaisers und der Hearstschen Gelben Presse.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 13
– Ein schwarzer Tag.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 15
Hustle!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 16
ist sein Motto – rühr' dich, rege dich, nütze die Zeit!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 17
Und hustling verlangt er auch von der Zeitung.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 24
Ihre Dollarjagd, ihre Hetzerei, ihr Sensationsdrang.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 29
Scoop heißt wörtlich eine große Schaufel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 31
Ich erlebte einen prachtvollen scoopbeim Examiner.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 32
Und half mit dabei.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 33
+++ Frühmorgens war es.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 36
– jawohl!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 37
Anscheinend verunglückt, jawohl.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 38
Wird von einem Trampdampfer eingeschleppt?« +++ Pause, lange Pause.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 39
Wir alle lauschten in atemloser Spannung.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 41
– Nein?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 42
– Schön.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 44
Ja?
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 45
Danke.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 46
Sie erhalten von uns fünfundzwanzig Dollars.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 47
– Schluß.« Das Telephon klingelte ab.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 49
Dann wandte er sich um.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 50
»Hayes!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 51
Telephonieren Sie doch, bitte, an die Schleppdampfergesellschaft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 52
Wir brauchen den schnellsten Schlepper, den sie haben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 53
Muß in einer halben Stunde unter Dampf sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 54
Examinerdienst, üblicher Charter für einen Tag.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 55
Nein – warten Sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 57
»Richtig.« Hayes ging zum Telephon und McGrady klingelte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 58
»Ich lasse Mr. Lascelles bitten,« befahl er dem eintretenden Pagen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 60
Daß jede Minute und jeder gesprochene Satz kostbar waren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 61
Der Chefredakteur kam augenblicklich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 63
Dringend, Expreß!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 64
Die beiden Herren schüttelten sich die Hände.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 66
»Verzeihen Sie, aber wir haben hier eine Sache, die keinen Aufschub duldet.« Lascelles nicke nur.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 68
Der Dampfer werde von einem kleinen Honolulu-Trampdampfer eingeschleppt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 69
Sie alle wissen, daß die Hongkong überfällig ist.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 70
Um was es sich handelt, läßt sich ja allerdings noch nicht sagen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 71
Mr. Lascelles, ich habe zwei Schleppdampfer beordert –« »Weshalb zwei?« »Wir haben Eile.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 73
Ich persönlich bin dafür, alles andere Lokale hinauszuwerfen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 74
Nur Hongkong, wichtige Politik, Börse, Vermischtes.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 77
»Wir lassen die Setzer und die Maschinenleute der Nachtschicht holen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 79
»Die Möglichkeit des Gelingens ist da,« antwortete Lascelles rasch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 80
» Allright, Mac.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 81
Disponieren Sie.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 83
Verfrühte Ausgabe also.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 84
Wissen Sie was?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 85
Es ist neuneinhalb Uhr.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 87
Eines der größten Schiffe der kalifornischen Chinalinie mit knapper Not dem Untergang entgangen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 88
Eine Tragödie der See.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 89
Siehe ersten Bericht im Nachmittags-Examiner.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 90
Oder so ähnlich ...« »Ausgezeichnet!« sagte McGrady.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 91
»Wenn wir den Anschluß erwischen, ist es eine große Sache.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 92
Meine Herren, der gesamte Stab geht auf den Schleppdampfer mit Ausnahme von Hayes.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 94
Orders kann ich Ihnen kaum geben, meine Herren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 95
Ferguson als der Aelteste wird disponieren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 96
Nur ganz allgemein: Wir wenden die natürliche Methode an.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 97
Die Ereignisse werden photographisch geschildert.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 98
Die Schilderung beginnt von dem Augenblick an, in dem Sie den Schleppdampfer betreten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 99
Diesen ersten Teil soll Ferguson machen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 100
Hetzfahrt und so weiter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 104
Los, meine Herren!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 106
Das nötige Zurechtdeichseln besorgen Lascelles und ich hier auf der Redaktion.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 107
Los!« »Einen Augenblick!« rief Lascelles.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 108
»Zeitungen mitnehmen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 109
Ist gute Reklame.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 112
Das Fahrttempo war viel zu schnell für die innere Bai.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 116
Goodbye!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 118
Das Häusermeer verschwand im Dunstkreis.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 119
Die Fischerflottillen in der äußeren Bai waren bald überholt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 120
Die nackten, felsigen Ufer schoben sich näher zusammen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 121
Wir dampften durch das Goldene Tor.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 122
Ferguson hatte, auf einen Decksessel hingekauert, schon längst zu schreiben begonnen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 123
unit 127
Das war die fünf Tage überfällige Hongkong.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 129
Ich kletterte mühselig von Plattform zu Plattform auf den schmalen stählernen Leitern.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 130
»'n Morgen,« sagte unten ein alter Mann mit weißen Haaren im blauen Maschinistenkittel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 132
»Guten Morgen!« »Erzählen Sie mir alles!« sagte ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 133
»Zeitung?« »Ja – Examiner.« »Dacht' ich mir,« grinste der Alte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 135
Mann, hier ist nichts los!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 136
Der Laden ist zu.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 137
Wir haben das Geschäft aus Mangel an Betriebskapital aufgegeben.« »Weiter!« bat ich geduldig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 140
Das is' alles!« +++ »Wie das passiert ist?« Er spuckte kräftig auf den Boden.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 142
Sehen Sie, ein Propellerschaft ist sozusagen 'n Luder!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 144
Das wir während der Fahrt pflegen und hätscheln, ölen und salben, als wär's 'n Baby.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 148
»Es passiert das, was uns passiert ist.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 151
Die Katze – –« »Die Maschinen?« »– jawohl – die Maschinen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 152
– die Maschinen wurden aufgeregt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 155
Ich hatte die Wache, Hand an der Drosselung.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 158
Zum Weinen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 161
Mann, sehen Sie nur hin!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 162
Der Hochdruckzylinder sieht aus wie 'n Baugerüst – pfui Deibel!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 164
Sie werden sich wundern!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 166
To–tal ver–saut!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 170
»Hübsch, nicht?« sagte der alte Mann.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 172
unit 173
Er fand das sehr schön!!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 178
Nichts fehlte.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 180
Es war einer der großen Tage der Zeitung gewesen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 183
unit 184
Wir lasen: »Examiner, Frisco.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 185
– Komplimente, Mac.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 186
Gute Arbeit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 187
Erwarte ausführlichen Bericht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 189
Ich sah Hearst erst Jahre später.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 190
Aber im Reporterzimmer wimmelte es von Anekdoten über den »Alten«.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 193
Die wollten sich totlachen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 194
Dann kam das Entsetzen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 195
unit 196
Zu schlafen schien er überhaupt nicht.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 197
Er war der Schrecken der Metteure.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 199
Sein Leben gehörte seiner Zeitung.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 200
Das folgende wahre Geschichtchen illustriert seine Manier vortrefflich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 201
Er gab ein Souper, das sich lange ausdehnte.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 205
Alles – weil die Überschrift des Leitartikels Hearst nicht zugkräftig genug war!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 207
Den großen Eindruck brauchte er – für die große Masse.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 208
Die war sein Götze.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 211
Der Erfolg bei der großen Masse kam fast augenblicklich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 213
Damals entstand das Wort von der Gelben Presse.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 216
Sensation!!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 217
Sensation!!!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 218
Das eine Bild trug die Ueberschrift: Die Gelbe Gefahr Europas!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 219
das andere: Die Gelbe Gefahr Amerikas!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 221
Die Gelbe Presse!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 223
Tut auch Unrecht, wie alle Schlagworte.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 225
Und lange vor Roosevelt schon kämpfte er gegen die Trusts.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 226
unit 227
+++ Nur einen einzigen Tag in jenen Monaten versäumte ich den Zeitungsdienst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 229
Ich freute mich gewaltig.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 231
In knappen Worten sprach der Freund zum Freund.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 232
Nur dann und wann blitzte ein Rat, eine Warnung auf.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 236
Das flößte mir gewaltigen Respekt ein.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 238
Der Erfolgreiche dem Erfolgreichen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 239
Der Freund dem Freund.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 240
Der Gleichberechtigte dem Gleichberechtigten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 241
Und nun las ich und saß erstarrt auf meinem Bett.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 242
Mein Vater war tot.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 244
Sie hatten ihn vor Wochen schon begraben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 217  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 219  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 218  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 216  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 213  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 206  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 207  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 208  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 210  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 54  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 52  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 43  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 50  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 98  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 89  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 85  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 82  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 77  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 30  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 98  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 82  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 209  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 34  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 25  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 14  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 205  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 18  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 209  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 212  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 213  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 165  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 78  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 77  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 242  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 76  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 22  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 18  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 20  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 215  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 228  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 215  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 159  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 211  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 196  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 201  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 203  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 202  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 162  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 217  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 216  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 104  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 132  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 133  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 154  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 150  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 149  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 145  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 143  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 114  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 125  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 138  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 147  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 174  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 190  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 187  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 139  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 138  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 113  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 83  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 189  4 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 178  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 90  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 101  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 90  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 116  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 17  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 85  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 15  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 1  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 43  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 55  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 50  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 28  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 27  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 45  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 44  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 44  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 42  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 41  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 36  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 36  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 21  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 1  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 16  4 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 15  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 3  4 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 15  4 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 2  4 months, 3 weeks ago

Reporterdienst.

Was der Amerikaner von seiner Zeitung verlangt. – Der scoop. – Der verunglückte Dampfer Hongkong. – Die Männer der schnellen Entschlüsse. – Wie ein Reporterstück inszeniert wird. – Auf der Jagd nach der Sensation. – Im Maschinenraum. – Wie ich die Kunst des Zuhörens ausübte. – Der Dämon im Stahl. – Zeitungskönig Hearst. – Eine Anekdote von der gelben Gefahr des Kaisers und der Hearstschen Gelben Presse. – Ein schwarzer Tag.
Das Leben des Amerikaners ist Hast und Hetze, nicht aus der Lebensnotwendigkeit der Jagd nach dem Dollar nur, sondern weil Hasten und Hetzen ihm von Kindesbeinen an gar nichts zu Beklagendes, sondern etwas Wunderschönes bedeuten. Hustle! ist sein Motto – rühr' dich, rege dich, nütze die Zeit! Und hustling verlangt er auch von der Zeitung. Der Mann, dem riesige Wolkenkratzer, donnernder Straßenlärm, jagende Eile im Stadtbild eine Art Kulturbedürfnis sind, verlangt von seiner Zeitung viel Lärm und gewaltigen Spektakel, und die grellen Farben, die sein Auge im Tagesleben überall erblickt. Zwei Zoll hoch müssen die Ueberschriften sein und gepfeffert in kräftigen Worten, so wie seine eigene Ausdrucksweise es ist; übertrieben, wie er gern übertreibt, der Mann, der sein Land das Land Gottes nennt, anstatt bescheidentlich vom Vaterland zu sprechen wie andere Leute. Die Eile, den raschen Entschluß, das schnelle Schaffen, die in seinem persönlichen Leben rumoren, will er auch in seiner Zeitung sehen. Ihm imponiert das Bild, die Tat, die große Schilderung, das Verblüffende; weise Worte möchte er nur gelegentlich und dann mit Vorsicht genießen! Rauschendes Leben muß an seinem inneren Ohr vorbeifließen, wenn er in den weichen Polstern der Hochbahn New Yorks die Zeitung überfliegt, auf daß seine Lektüre im Einklang mit dem Taktschlag seines Tages klinge. So ist aus dem hastenden Amerikaner heraus und seiner Liebe für grelle Lichter und lauten Lärm die amerikanische Zeitung entstanden.
Ihre Dollarjagd, ihre Hetzerei, ihr Sensationsdrang.
Sieht man aber näher zu und wühlt man sich durch den marktschreierischen Wortkram der Ueberschriften und der Floskeln in den Aufsätzen, so entdeckt man erstaunt, daß hinter der brutalen Sensation eine gründliche, ehrliche, bewunderungswürdige Arbeitsleistung von ganz gewaltigen Verhältnissen steckt und zwar häufig gerade da, wo der als so leichtsinnig verschrieene Reporter gearbeitet hat. Dieser Reporter, der so gut wie die Besten die jungfrische Kraft und den Unternehmungsgeist und den Bienenfleiß des Dollarlandes repräsentiert. Er ist es, der seiner Zeitung die großen Erfolge verschaffen muß, die man in der Zeitungssprache scoops nennt. Sie allein machen Eindruck auf den modernen Amerikaner: sie allein sichern dem Blatt ein rasches Emporschnellen der Zirkulation, ein Wachsen im Ansehen.
Scoop heißt wörtlich eine große Schaufel. To scoop in bedeutet einheimsen, einschaufeln, einsacken, und im übertragenen Sinne will der spöttische Zeitungsausdruck besagen: Daß man eine hochwichtige Neuigkeit ganz für sich allein, ganz zu allererst eingeheimst, eingeschaufelt hat, während die betrübte Konkurrenz wehmütig dasteht und den kahlen Boden vierundzwanzig Stunden später nach schäbigen Resten absucht. Ich erlebte einen prachtvollen scoopbeim Examiner. Und half mit dabei.
+++
Frühmorgens war es. Noch hatte die Arbeit nicht begonnen und die Reporterfamilie auf der Jagd nach den Ereignissen des Tages sich über die Stadt zerstreut, als McGradys Telephon, das von der Examinerzentrale nur dann eingeschaltet wurde, wenn es sich um eine sehr wichtige Mitteilung handelte, rasselnd erklingelte. Mac nahm den Hörer ab:
»Examiner – Nachrichtendienst.«
+++
»Jawohl – Leuchtturmwärter – Station Goldenes Tor – ja – wie heißt der Dampfer – die Hongkong? – jawohl! Anscheinend verunglückt, jawohl. Wird von einem Trampdampfer eingeschleppt?«
+++
Pause, lange Pause. Wir alle lauschten in atemloser Spannung. Dann fragte Mac weiter:
»Der Dampfer ist nur durch ein gutes Fernrohr sichtbar, sagen Sie?«
+++
»Haben Sie die Nachricht einer anderen Zeitung gegeben? – Nein? – Schön. Erstatten Sie nur die Ihnen dienstlich vorgeschriebenen Meldungen an die Behörden und benachrichtigen Sie keine andere Zeitung. Ja? Danke. Sie erhalten von uns fünfundzwanzig Dollars. – Schluß.«
Das Telephon klingelte ab.
Allan McGrady hängte langsam und bedächtig den Hörer auf, ging zu seinem Schreibtisch, nahm sich eine Zigarette und zündete sie umständlich an, während wir schweigend dastanden. Dann wandte er sich um.
»Hayes! Telephonieren Sie doch, bitte, an die Schleppdampfergesellschaft. Wir brauchen den schnellsten Schlepper, den sie haben. Muß in einer halben Stunde unter Dampf sein. Examinerdienst, üblicher Charter für einen Tag. Nein – warten Sie. Nicht einen, sondern zwei Schlepper brauchen wir.«
»Zwei Schlepper – in einer halben Stunde!« wiederholte Hayes.
»Richtig.« Hayes ging zum Telephon und McGrady klingelte. »Ich lasse Mr. Lascelles bitten,« befahl er dem eintretenden Pagen.
Von uns sagte keiner ein Wort, denn jeder wußte, daß es sich um etwas Großes handelte; um rasches Denken, um schnelles Disponieren. Daß jede Minute und jeder gesprochene Satz kostbar waren. Der Chefredakteur kam augenblicklich. Wenn ein Redakteur den andern oder gar den Chef »bitten« ließ, anstatt sich selbst zu bemühen, so bedeutete das: Eile. Dringend, Expreß! Die beiden Herren schüttelten sich die Hände.
»Guten Morgen, Lascelles,« sagte McGrady, der nie ruhiger und kühler sprach, als wenn er sehr aufgeregt war. »Verzeihen Sie, aber wir haben hier eine Sache, die keinen Aufschub duldet.«
Lascelles nicke nur. McGrady fuhr fort:
»Der Leuchtturmwärter von der Goldenen-Tor-Station telephoniert, er habe soeben den Dampfer Hongkong der San Franzisko-China-Linie gesichtet. Der Dampfer werde von einem kleinen Honolulu-Trampdampfer eingeschleppt. Sie alle wissen, daß die Hongkong überfällig ist. Um was es sich handelt, läßt sich ja allerdings noch nicht sagen. Mr. Lascelles, ich habe zwei Schleppdampfer beordert –«
»Weshalb zwei?«
»Wir haben Eile. Ich möchte vorschlagen, daß wir die Nachmittagsausgabe zwei Stunden früher erscheinen lassen mit zwölf bis zwanzig Spalten Hongkong an erster Stelle. Ich persönlich bin dafür, alles andere Lokale hinauszuwerfen. Nur Hongkong, wichtige Politik, Börse, Vermischtes. In zwei Stunden frühestens hat der »Call« die Nachricht von den Behörden, auf jeden Fall aber nach uns. Selbst wenn es sich nur um eine Stunde oder auch eine halbe Stunde Differenz handeln sollte, so haben wir doch Vorsprung, und die Leute vom Call kommen sicher nicht auf den Gedanken, daß wir zwei Stunden früher erscheinen könnten!«
»Teufel – das können wir aber doch nicht, Mac!«
»Ich meine, es müßte eben gehen,« sagte Allan McGrady nachdenklich. »Wir lassen die Setzer und die Maschinenleute der Nachtschicht holen. Was Manuskript anbetrifft, so soll der zweite Schlepper die ersten Nachrichten übermitteln, sobald es nur irgendwie geht, und der Rest muß eben auch im Handumdrehen da sein – ich kann mich auf meine Leute verlassen.« (Es geschah sehr selten, daß McGrady dergleichen sagte, aber wenn es geschah, so hätten wir uns in Stücke zerreißen lassen für ihn!!)
»Die Möglichkeit des Gelingens ist da,« antwortete Lascelles rasch. » Allright, Mac. Disponieren Sie. Sie wissen, daß wir gute tausend Dollars Extraausgaben riskieren und der alte Mann uns die Hölle heiß machen wird, wenn die Sache schief geht. Verfrühte Ausgabe also. Wissen Sie was? Es ist neuneinhalb Uhr. Um zwölf Uhr, oder sagen wir Halbeins, lassen wir ein Extra verteilen: Die Hongkong hilflos eingeschleppt. Eines der größten Schiffe der kalifornischen Chinalinie mit knapper Not dem Untergang entgangen. Eine Tragödie der See. Siehe ersten Bericht im Nachmittags-Examiner. Oder so ähnlich ...«
»Ausgezeichnet!« sagte McGrady. »Wenn wir den Anschluß erwischen, ist es eine große Sache. Meine Herren, der gesamte Stab geht auf den Schleppdampfer mit Ausnahme von Hayes. Hayes – weinen Sie nicht, Sie haben schwierige und verantwortungsvolle Arbeit genug; Sie müssen auf die Frisco-China-Linie und zu den Versicherungsgesellschaften. Orders kann ich Ihnen kaum geben, meine Herren. Ferguson als der Aelteste wird disponieren. Nur ganz allgemein: Wir wenden die natürliche Methode an. Die Ereignisse werden photographisch geschildert. Die Schilderung beginnt von dem Augenblick an, in dem Sie den Schleppdampfer betreten. Diesen ersten Teil soll Ferguson machen. Hetzfahrt und so weiter. Die Hongkong wird gesichtet – Beschreibung, bitte, wie der Kasten aussieht – man klettert an Bord« – (er lachte) »und wenn einer der Herren dabei ins Wasser fallen sollte, wär' das eine schöne Sache –«
Schallendes Gelächter.
»– und wenn einer der Herren so gütig sein würde, dabei im Dienste des Examiners zu ertrinken, so wär' das noch viel schöner vom Zeitungsstandpunkt aus!« (Das war Macs gruselige Art von Humor.) »Passagiere schildern also – sie interviewen – Kapitän, Offiziere interviewen – sehen, was los ist – sperrt sich der Kapitän, so wird ihm unter die Nase gerieben, daß der Examiner und die Öffentlichkeit sich nicht bluffen lassen – die Wahrheit kommt doch an den Tag. Los, meine Herren! Ich bitte mir aus, daß flott gearbeitet und beim Schreiben auf der Heimfahrt keine Zeit an stilistische Künsteleien verplempert wird. Das nötige Zurechtdeichseln besorgen Lascelles und ich hier auf der Redaktion. Los!«
»Einen Augenblick!« rief Lascelles. »Zeitungen mitnehmen! Ist gute Reklame. Die Passagiere werden sich freuen, nach sechzehn Tagen wieder eine Zeitung aus dem Lande Gottes zu sehen!«
Eine Minute später stürmten in Holtergepoltereile zehn Zeitungsmänner zum Hafen, und fünfundzwanzig Minuten darauf jagten in sausender Fahrt die Hochseeschlepper Furor und Golden Gate durch das Schiffahrtsgewimmel der inneren Bai dem Goldenen Tore zu. An den Flaggenstangen im Heck flatterten die Hausflaggen der Zeitung mit ihrer grellroten Inschrift auf weißem Grund: San Francisco Examiner. Das Fahrttempo war viel zu schnell für die innere Bai. aber der Examiner durfte bei seinen Beziehungen zur Hafenpolizei eine kleine Gesetzesübertretung schon riskieren. Die Schiffe, denen wir begegneten, wurden aufmerksam, und mehr als einmal schallten brüllende Megaphonfragen zu uns herüber, was in Dreikuckucksnamen denn eigentlich los sei. Unser Kapitän antwortete gewöhnlich: »Erkundigt euch beim nächsten Polizisten!« Oder grimmiger:
»Sind – in Eile – haben– – keine Zeit – –
euch – was vorzulügen! Goodbye!!«
Alcatras Island, die winzige, mit Kanonen gespickte Felseninsel im Zentrum des Hafens, huschte vorbei; die schmale Bai wurde breiter, die Wogen gingen höher. Das Häusermeer verschwand im Dunstkreis. Die Fischerflottillen in der äußeren Bai waren bald überholt. Die nackten, felsigen Ufer schoben sich näher zusammen.
Wir dampften durch das Goldene Tor. Ferguson hatte, auf einen Decksessel hingekauert, schon längst zu schreiben begonnen. Nun sah er auf und gab uns seine Instruktionen, die auf eine genaue Verteilung der Arbeit hinausliefen. Mir wurde die Beschreibung des Maschinenraums zugeteilt, während Ferguson selbst das Interview mit dem Chefingenieur der Hongkong übernahm. Aber der blinde Glückszufall hatte mir, dem Jüngsten, eine lohnendere Aufgabe gegeben als ihm, dem Unerfahrenen ... In einer Viertelstunde wurden Rauchwolken sichtbar am Horizont, und bald darauf tauchte die schwarze Masse eines Riesenschiffes auf, geschleppt von einem winzigen Dampfer. Das war die fünf Tage überfällige Hongkong.
+++
Die elektrischen Lampen glühten im Maschinenraum, aber die gewaltigen Feuerlöcher der Kessel lagen grau und leblos da und Stille herrschte. Ich kletterte mühselig von Plattform zu Plattform auf den schmalen stählernen Leitern.
»'n Morgen,« sagte unten ein alter Mann mit weißen Haaren im blauen Maschinistenkittel. Er betrachtete mich vergnügt aus blinzelnden Augen und schob bedächtig den Pfeifenstummel aus dem linken Mundwinkel in den rechten, während er mit der einen Hand die Lagerung eines sausenden Dynamos prüfend betastete und mit der andern ein frischgewaschenes Hemd näher an die Feuerung des kleinen Hilfskessels hielt. »Guten Morgen!«
»Erzählen Sie mir alles!« sagte ich.
»Zeitung?«
»Ja – Examiner.«
»Dacht' ich mir,« grinste der Alte. »Ich bin der dritte Ingenieur dieses gesegneten Schiffes, und wie Sie sehen, beschäftige ich mich damit, ein bißchen elektrische Kraft zu fabrizieren und die Familienwäsche zu trocknen. Mann, hier ist nichts los! Der Laden ist zu. Wir haben das Geschäft aus Mangel an Betriebskapital aufgegeben.«
»Weiter!« bat ich geduldig.
»Weiter nichts.«
»Propellerbruch, wie ich höre, nicht wahr?«
»Propellerschaftbruch, junger Mann, fachmännisch ausgedrückt.« sagte der Alte und drehte seine trocknende Familienwäsche nach der anderen Seite. »Das heißt, daß ungefähr in der Mitte zwischen hier und Honolulu in zweitausend bis dreitausend Meter Tiefe auf dem Grunde des Meeres ein Propeller, ein drei Meter langes Stück Propellerschaft, ungefähr sechs Heckplatten mit Zubehör, dreiviertel eines Steuerruders und noch verschiedene andere belanglose Kleinigkeiten liegen, alles zusammen etwa achtzigtausend Pfund schwer und etliche hunderttausend Dollars wert. Das is' alles!«
+++
»Wie das passiert ist?« Er spuckte kräftig auf den Boden. »Junger Mann, ich bin siebenundzwanzig Jahre lang Maschinist, und trotzdem weiß ich das ebensowenig wie Sie. Sehen Sie, ein Propellerschaft ist sozusagen 'n Luder! 'n dickes, langes Stück Stahl, das vor jeder Ausreise von einem halben Dutzend Ingenieuren und mindestens drei Behörden Zoll für Zoll abgeklopft und untersucht und begutachtet wird. Das wir während der Fahrt pflegen und hätscheln, ölen und salben, als wär's 'n Baby. 'n Stück Stahl, das eine Krafteinwirkung von sechstausend Pferdekräften und Wasserwiderstände von achtzehntausend Pferdekräften auf seinem runden Buckel aushalten muß. 'n Stück Stahl, dem die Kräfte und die Widerstände hie und da – es kommt nicht häufig vor, dem lieben Gott sei Dank – zu viel werden. Dann geht's knax, und der Teufel ist los!«
»Was passiert dann?«
»Oh, nichts von Bedeutung.« Er lachte schallend auf und schlug sich aufs Knie. »Es passiert das, was uns passiert ist. Ungefähr das, was geschieht, wenn man einer kleinen Katze plötzlich den Schwanz abschneidet – der Schwanz fällt herunter, nicht wahr, und die kleine Katze gebärdet sich ungewöhnlich lebendig und aufgeregt. Na, unser Propellerschwanz mit einigem Zubehör, das er im Vorbeigehen mitnahm, liegt – well, zwischen hier und Honolulu. Die Katze – –«
»Die Maschinen?«
»– jawohl – die Maschinen! – die Maschinen wurden aufgeregt. Das ist ungefähr so, als wenn vier Pferde aus Leibeskräften an einem schweren Sandwagen zerrten und plötzlich rissen sämtliche Stränge. Worauf die vier Gäule übereinanderpurzeln und mit den Beinen strampeln würden ... Um drei Uhr nachts ist es passiert. Ich hatte die Wache, Hand an der Drosselung. Drei Sekunden nach dem großen Krach hatte ich abgedrosselt und fünfzig Sekunden später das hintere mechanische Sicherheitsschott geschlossen. Die drei Sekunden jedoch genügten den Maschinen vollkommen, um übereinanderzupurzeln – Lagerungen verballert, Hochdruckzylinder verbogen, Kolben schief, als wären sie besoffen, alle Verbindungen gelockert, alle Schrauben heidi – ein Jammer, junger Mann, ein trauriger Jammer. Zum Weinen! Aber das verstehen Sie nicht – sind ja kein Maschinenmensch ...«
»Und dann?«
»Schlossen wir den Laden. Ließen Dampf ab, dichteten das Kollisionsschott, pumpten das Stück pazifischen Ozean aus, das in den Maschinenraum gedrungen war, und stützten unsere armen Maschinen mit allerlei Gebälk. Mann, sehen Sie nur hin! Der Hochdruckzylinder sieht aus wie 'n Baugerüst – pfui Deibel! Das erledigt, warteten wir auf die göttliche Vorsehung und den dreckigen Trampdampfer, der mit seinem bißchen Schleppen ein Riesenvermögen an uns verdient.«
»Darf ich den Maschinenraum ansehen?«
»Kommen Sie! Sie werden sich wundern! Er sieht ungefähr so aus wie ein Zwischendeck mit siebenhundert seekranken Chinesen am dritten Tag der Ausreise von Hongkong. To–tal ver–saut!!«
Seufzend hing er das schon beinahe getrocknete Hemd über eine blanke Kupferröhre und führte mich in das Allerinnerste der Hongkong. Ein beschwerliches Kriechen war es, schmale Gänge entlang und unter den Leibern stählerner Ungeheuer durch. Ein Gewirr von Balken stützte die einzelnen Teile der Riesenmaschinen, die der furchtbare Stoß der im Augenblick des Bruchs entfesselten widerstandslosen Kräfte völlig unbrauchbar gemacht hatte; zerbrochene, verbogene Röhren, geknicktes Gestänge, schiefe Stahlsäulen, abgesprungene Harteisenstücke, weißgrau an den Bruchrändern, lagen umher.
»Hübsch, nicht?« sagte der alte Mann. »Nun stellen Sie sich, bitte, vor, daß ein winzig kleiner Fehler, ein völlig unsichtbarer, unentdeckbarer Riß in einem runden Stück Stahl von zwanzig Zoll Durchmesser ausreichte, um für eine halbe Million Dollars Maschinen in drei Sekunden über den Haufen zu werfen!!«
Da beschloß der Lausbub, seinem Teil des Berichts die Überschrift zu geben: Der Dämon im Stahl!
Er fand das sehr schön!!
+++
Während der Furor in einer Wolke von schwarzquellendem Rauch hafenwärts sauste, schrieb ich und schrieb und schrieb, denn es war ja so leicht. Hatte mir doch das Glück das Schönste und Packendste in einem großen Zeitungsereignis bescheert – den grimmigen düsteren Humor der Wirklichkeit ...
Unser scoop gelang glänzend. Mit flammenden Ueberschriften und sechzehn Spalten Hongkong erschien derExaminer zwei Stunden vor dem Call. In einer Gesamtzeit von sieben Stunden vom Einlaufen der Meldung bis zur Ausgabe der fertigen Zeitung war ein für die Hafenstadt unendlich interessantes Ereignis lebendig und exakt geschildert worden, in der Ausführlichkeit einer graphischen Darstellung von über dreitausend Zeilen Länge. Nichts fehlte. Das Aussehen der Hongkong – der Bericht des Kapitäns – die Schilderung der Leute des Schleppdampfers – die Szenen des Schreckens der Unglücksnacht.
Es war einer der großen Tage der Zeitung gewesen.
+++
Der Hongkongbericht war in gekürzter Form nach New York und Chicago an das New York-Journal und die Chicago-Dispatch telegraphiert worden, denn wir und jene beiden Blätter arbeiteten stets Hand in Hand. Gehörten »wir« doch einem gemeinsamen Eigentümer, dem Verleger des New York-Journal, William R. Hearst. Als wir uns am nächsten Morgen im Reporterzimmer einfanden, hielt uns Mac lachend eine Depesche entgegen. Wir lasen:
»Examiner, Frisco. – Komplimente, Mac. Gute Arbeit. Erwarte ausführlichen Bericht. – Hearst.«
Das war bezeichnend für William R. Hearst, dem nichts zu klein war im Zeitungsdienst, um sich nicht persönlich darum zu bekümmern, und nichts zu groß, sich mit seinen Zeitungen nicht daran zu wagen. Ich sah Hearst erst Jahre später. Aber im Reporterzimmer wimmelte es von Anekdoten über den »Alten«. Als Hearsts Vater, der Besitzer des New York-Journal, gestorben war und ihm die Zeitung hinterlassen hatte, wurde aus dem bedeutungslosen Jungen, der bisher nur durch modische Kleidung und grelle Krawatten aufgefallen war, mit einem Schlage ein Arbeiter. Er erklärte den redaktionellen und geschäftlichen Leitern seiner Zeitung, daß in Zukunft er der Herr sei und sonst niemand. Die wollten sich totlachen.
Dann kam das Entsetzen.
Der junge Hearst gönnte sich nicht einmal die Zeit zum Essen – und anderen Leuten erst recht nicht. Zu schlafen schien er überhaupt nicht. Er war der Schrecken der Metteure. Er nächtigte im Setzersaale und schrieb bis aufs letzte –i– Pünktchen die Schriftarten vor, die die Überschriften der einzelnen Artikel anziehend machen sollten für Seine Majestät das Publikum.
Sein Leben gehörte seiner Zeitung. Das folgende wahre Geschichtchen illustriert seine Manier vortrefflich. Er gab ein Souper, das sich lange ausdehnte. Um drei Uhr morgens brachte ihm ein Bote die erste Kopie der Morgenausgabe des Journal, das soeben zur Presse gegangen war. Hearst sprang nach einem Blick auf die Zeitung wütend auf, ohne seinen verblüfften Gästen auch nur ein Wort der Erklärung zu geben, und rannte in die Nacht hinaus. Nach Luft schnappend, kam er im Journalgebäude an, ließ die Presse stoppen und telephonierte den Chefredakteur herbei.
Alles – weil die Überschrift des Leitartikels Hearst nicht zugkräftig genug war!
Er pflegte stundenlang der Länge nach ausgestreckt in seinem Privatkontor auf dem Teppich zu liegen, die Riesenseiten des Journal vor sich ausgebreitet, um die Wirkung der »Aufmachung« zu studieren. Den großen Eindruck brauchte er – für die große Masse. Die war sein Götze. Er gab Unsummen aus für Spezialdrähte, mietete einen Privatdraht zwischen New York und Washington, um die Kongreßdepeschen früher zu haben, gewann Generäle und Minister als Mitarbeiter. Er schlug die Zeitungen New Yorks wieder und wieder in der Schnelligkeit und Ausführlichkeit wichtiger Nachrichten. Der Erfolg bei der großen Masse kam fast augenblicklich. Die Auflagenziffern des New York-Journal schnellten zu verblüffender Höhe empor, und aus der einen Zeitung wurde ein Zeitungssyndikat in New York, Chicago und San Franzisko, mit Hearst als Alleinbesitzer. Damals entstand das Wort von der Gelben Presse.
Ueber seine Entstehung habe ich von amerikanischen Zeitungsfreunden folgendes Geschichtchen erzählen hören:
Als der deutsche Kaiser der gelben Gefahr sein Zeichentalent widmete und die Völker Europas warnte, ihre heiligsten Güter zu wahren, kam der Karikaturist einer Washingtoner Zeitung auf die hübsche Idee, die kaiserliche Zeichnung, die in Amerika großes Aufsehen und bei der Abneigung gegen die gelbe Rasse starken Beifall erregt hatte, polemisch zu verwerten. Er zeichnete in einem Bild einen messerschwingenden Chinesen, in einem andern Bild daneben den das Journal schwingenden Hearst, umgeben von tanzenden Teufelchen, die alle schrien: Sensation! Sensation!! Sensation!!! Das eine Bild trug die Ueberschrift: Die Gelbe Gefahr Europas! das andere: Die Gelbe Gefahr Amerikas! Die politische Welt der Vereinigten Staaten lachte und nannte den Zeitungsmann den gelben Hearst und seine Zeitungen die gelben Zeitungen. Die Gelbe Presse!
Wie nun das bissige Wortbild auch entstanden sein mag, es kennzeichnet mit seinem Vergleich mit der krassesten aller Farben, dem schreienden Gelb, den Hunger nach Sensation vorzüglich. Tut auch Unrecht, wie alle Schlagworte. Hearst hat starken Einfluß auf die Entwicklung der amerikanischen Presse ausgeübt und dem modernen Nachrichtendienst unvergeßliche Dienste geleistet. Und lange vor Roosevelt schon kämpfte er gegen die Trusts. Seine politische Stellung als einer der Führer der demokratischen Partei wird von Jahr zu Jahr stärker.
+++
Nur einen einzigen Tag in jenen Monaten versäumte ich den Zeitungsdienst.
Das war an jenem Tag, als frühmorgens Madame Legrange klopfte und mir einen Brief brachte, einen Brief aus Deutschland. Ich freute mich gewaltig. Mein wortkarger Vater schrieb mir nur selten, aber zwischen den Zeilen der wenigen Briefe konnte ich lesen, daß meine jungenhafte Begeisterung im Dienste der Zeitung und mein naives Schildern des Lebens um mich ihn freuten. In knappen Worten sprach der Freund zum Freund. Nur dann und wann blitzte ein Rat, eine Warnung auf. »Du wirst vielleicht nie nach Deutschland zurückkehren, aber vergiß dein Land nicht, denn seine Art bleibt deine Art!« schrieb er mir einmal. »Du hast es sehr schwer, denn du bist niemand Verantwortung schuldig als dir selbst ...« hieß es ein andermal. Vor allem aber verblüffte mich die genaue Kenntnis der amerikanischen Verhältnisse, die aus diesen Briefen sprach; eine weit gründlichere und tiefere Kenntnis als die meinige, der ich doch im Lande lebte und schaffte. Das flößte mir gewaltigen Respekt ein. Wenn das deutsche Heimweh über mich kam, und das tat es manchmal, nahmen die Sehnsucht und die Träume die Form an, daß ich es mir erträumte, dem Vater einst als erfolgreicher Mann wieder gegenüberzutreten. Der Erfolgreiche dem Erfolgreichen. Der Freund dem Freund. Der Gleichberechtigte dem Gleichberechtigten.
Und nun las ich und saß erstarrt auf meinem Bett. Mein Vater war tot. Gestorben an einer fürchterlichen Krankheit, nach jahrelangem Siechtum, das mir auf seinen Befehl verheimlicht worden war. Sie hatten ihn vor Wochen schon begraben.
An jenem Tag der Verzweiflung begann ich zu ahnen, was Alleinsein im fernen Lande in Wirklichkeit war und was die Bande des Bluts bedeuteten, aber Jahre sollten noch vergehen, bis ich verstand, daß in dem Grab im Münchner Nordfriedhof mein Allereigenstes lag. Daß aus meinem Vater meine Kraft und mein Leichtsinn und meine Art stammte, und daß ich dem Mann, der als kriegsinvalider Offizier nach den Feldzügen der Jahre 1866 und 1870 frisch und kraftvoll nach einem neuen Leben gegriffen und sich als nationalökonomischer und wirtschaftlicher Geistesarbeiter einen reichen Wirkungskreis geschaffen hatte, alle Zähigkeit des Wollens und Willens verdankte.