de-en  Der Deutsche Lausbub in Amerika - Zweiter Teil - Kapitel 2
• Chapter 2.

At the American Newspaper.

Bob by the "Münchner Neueste Nachrichten". - The poor devils of German journalists. - A newspaper palace in Munich. - In the American Reporter's Room. - How the newspaper baby learned his trade. - The secret of the press. - In the Presidio. - I'm studying how to telegraph. - The language of the copper wire. -Telegraphic laughter. - From the great value of life.
It may have been a year or two ago when I met an old American newspaper friend on the street in Munich, my hometown. First of all, we went to the Hofbräuhaus for a morning pint, and towards the end of the second measure Bob was almost crying. He found it too sad that someone who had once had the privilege of sticking his nose into the world of the American newspaper now had to toil away for German newspapers!
He took the "Münchner Neuesten Nachrichten" from the table and crumpled it up.
"You poor devil!" he said. "You poor devil - you poor, poor devil. Your beer is a wonder! Your coziness is magnificent! Your art is grandiose! But your newspapers - great God, man, that's not a newspaper - that's a miniature leaflet - damn it, the whole thing there that calls itself a newspaper doesn't even have room enough for one decent trial report!" He went on to say that he did not really understand how anyone could live anywhere else other than in God's Country, in the land of God, in the god-blessed United States, which for absolute perfection, however lacks absolutely nothing at all, other than the no less god-blessed beer of the art city of Munich. An eternal secret, though, nailed up with seven inch-thick boards is and remains for him that one to whom it had been granted - - etc. etc.
I laughed and led him into the "Münchner Neueste Nachrichten" building.
The men of Munich-born women are always hospitable and even kind to their employees, of whom, the one who wrote this book knows how to sing a grateful tune. Bob got to see and to hear quite a bit. We chatted with the feature editor about the essence of the arts feature column (a book with seven seals to the American journalist) - we talked to the man of domestic politics about the editorial (which represents something completely insignificant in American newspapers) - we visited the local editorial staff, and of course their editor, using the good opportunity to carve out a nice interview about the American journalist's impressions of Munich.
"Good!" Bob said out in the corridor. "Damn good! People know their job. They love their work. "It's just a pity that the poor devils have so ridiculously little line space at their disposal." Then he stopped, shaking his head. "It is always said that people in Germany are so extremely careful with their dollars," he grumbled. "But I'll be hanged if there's one newspaper in our country that accommodates its people nearly as luxuriously as that leaflet there! It's remarkable!" He became more and more astonished shaking his head, the more rooms of the editorial office he saw. ... There was furniture, each piece of which had been created by a great artist and artistic wonders of bronze, desks and lighting fixtures and precious club chairs and magical wallpaper and Persian carpets and recent originals on the walls, and nothing at all of the hustle and bustle of newspaper life could be outwardly seen. The droning and pounding of the huge rotary machines up from the concrete-covered ground floor was as quiet as a hum. Then we chatted again with other men, and Bob saw that the newspaper spirit is a world spirit, and newspaper work is the same everywhere, huge, gigantic despite all the differences in style and format. He chuckled with delight as we passed over into the realm of "youth" and walked through the hall of the most wonderful art printing machines, the many dozens of steel picture wizards that are even more wonderful than the greatest rotary monster.
"Good - good - damn good!" said Bob. "But if I'm not quite mistaken, there‘s one thing you don‘t have: our American reporter..." I laughed and gave no answer. For my times of American reporting are to me like a dear fairy tale of my first childhood love, and the one who judges the time of first love critically must even be an ossified critic. I don't think you really find American journalism in the German newspaper world. I don't even know if it would be desirable to have them. I only know that my own experience as a twenty-year-old rascal in the American newspaper service represents to me one of the fairy tales of my youth, which one draws on in the days of maturity.
+++ Outwardly, there was nothing fairy tale-like about it. ...
A reporter's day at the San Francisco Examiner began with work, was filled with work, ended with work, and at night one dreamt of work.
When I first took my place at a corner table in the reporters' room, I felt so infinitely helpless, so low in spirit, so incapable of anything that I would have preferred to run away from it again. I stared at the white paper in front of me, looked at the inkwell, looked sceptically at the typewriter on the small table next to me and wondered what in the devil I was actually supposed to do. Twelve men, the newspaper's entire reporter staff, had been introduced to me one after the other, and everyone had smiled and said something kind, and then in no way cared any more about my ghastly embarrassed humble self. So I sat there with the desperate feeling that it was a reporter's job to write something. But in the devil's name what?
I was surrounded everywhere by typewriters. The door was continually ripped open, and people came in and went out. My new colleagues were chatting and laughing - in the middle of their work. How it could be possible to put a sensible thought to paper with this hellish noise was a mystery to me for the time being.
It smelled like fresh printing ink. Paper covered the floor ankle-deep, all kinds of paper, hand-written, machine-written, printed. Along the wall stood heavily scratched and ink-stained desks and small tables upon which shiny typewriters were enthroned. The narrow side of the room was taken up by the bookstand with its uncountable reference books. A note in red said that the culprit who was caught not putting a book back again to its proper place, had to buy everone present a glass of beer as fine and penalty. There were telephones on the walls, the electric alarm system for the Fire-brigade, as well as the special telephone to the police headquarters, a map of San Francisco and a foot high table stood in the middle of the room covered with the latest newspapers. Electric light bulbs glittered everywhere because the room was too big for the only window to be able to illuminate it even on the brightest sunny day. The whitened walls were densely scribbled. Opposite the entrance door was written in large letters: "Stranger, who enters here, make haste to leave again, because we need our time for ourselves!" And under this, a roughly sketched hand pointed to the large desk in the corner by the window: "Alan McGrady, local editor, bigshot, high priest! Watch out, this guy bites! !« And suddenly all the men disappeared and the room was empty. Only the man who bit was still there. He looked up from his work and called me by name.
"Mr. McGrady?" Allan Mcgrady's sharp eyes gleefully blinked over the rims of his golden glasses. A smile scurried across the sharp, clean-shaven face. "You'd better say Mac to me, my son," he said grinning, "because in a few days you will do it anyway. Here everyone has his nickname, and I will probably be called Mac until the end of my life. I can by the way predict what your nickname will be: as the youngest reporter, you are and will remain the baby until another comes who is still younger and dumber than you!" I must have made a very stunned face - "When I say dumb, I mean of course only in the reporter's sense, and hopefully also in this sense, in several months you will no longer be dumb. And now I want to give you some guidance, my son. There are no masters or servants here. We are all co-workers in the service of the newspaper, and in our lives there must be nothing more important than the newspaper. It is that, that unites us. We're one big family. We share our cigars and our whiskey, sometimes even our money - well you'll find out about that pretty soon. We're all blood brothers. If there's something you don't know, ask your neighbor. If you are a bit depressed, come to me...Above all, keep your head up and don't let yourself be baffled! You will automatically see and hear and learn by yourself – and neither I nor anyone can help you here much. Journalism must be in your blood, and those who do not have it will never be one! And now - "He assigned me to my first job at the Examiner.
At nine o'clock in the morning the crowd of reporters met in the reporters' room, while Mac had already arrived at his desk a quarter hour earlier. A natural prerequisite was, of course, that each of the "masters of the staff" had thoroughly read not only his own paper but also the other San Francisco morning newspapers at breakfast. This morning conference always had a funny and a less funny side. They laughed and chatted and played all kinds of practical jokes, Mac as well as all of us, until he suddenly became Mr. Allan McGrady and assumed his famous gesture of seriousness. Then he used to put his hands in his pockets.
Short, sharp, very rough was his speech- "Baby!" ( That was me!) the " Call" (that was a San Francisco morning newspaper) also carried your story about the man who was taken to the city prison totally drunk and in whose pockets they found $15,000. That's sad and wrong of you. If a police sergeant - who was it?" "McBride". "I see- McBride. When McBride tells you good stuff, make sure he keeps his mouth shut and doesn't talk to the Call people. I don't care how you do that!" "But Mac, you did rail recently at how stupid it was when I gave the sergeant five bucks the other day, so that --" "Quite right, my son! This is not done with money, because money is scarce, but with kindness and cunning. Man, exert your wits! Am I perhaps a nurse and doomed in all eternity to let you suck at the source of the simplest wisdom?" I was deeply ashamed.
"Well, by the way, the item in ours is better than in the Call. Johnny (this was editor-in-chief Lascelles) lets you know that the story is fun and not bad..." That was McGrady's kind of recognition.
So every morning, the work of the previous day was discussed column by column and again and again it was hammered in that for those who wanted to dwell in the reporter's room, there was and could be nothing in the world but one interest and one love: the newspaper and the interests of the newspaper. First comes the newspaper and second the newspaper and third nothing but the newspaper!
The rascal soon felt as well in the air of the reporter's room like a fish in water. Because he was young and had a dash of enthusiasm in his blood, what in reality was serious and hard work seemed to him to be a fun, easy game. Always new and peculiar. Always enticing. Always exciting. The work went helter-skelter all day until late into the night. The tiny room in Donelly Street at Madame Legrange's saw me only at bedtime. In my eagerness I didn't realize that I was a "hard-ridden horse" and had to have learned more from the Examiner in a single day than the most demanding professorial board of a secondary school would have demanded in a whole week's workload... For the good will and the bit of talent didn't have long to act. I had to digest an enormous amount of material and acquire a tangled mass of factual knowledge that I would have gone back in horror if I had even had an inkling that I wasn't at all playing, but "studying". But the newspaper has its own way of teaching and being taught. It appealed to ambition and honor and strength by giving confidence. McGrady never let me feel that I was a rookie and an apprentice, and his guiding hands gently showed me the ropes. From the very first day, like everyone else, my tasks were assigned to me and I worked in all departments of the news service. I was sent to the police headquarters and to the individual police sergeants, assisted with reporting major criminal cases and was introduced to local political figures and used in service at the docks. A smiling piece of advice, as if tossed between those of equal standing, in silence as a matter of course, a funny coarseness that never contained anything hurtful, a word here, a nod there, the constant contact, especially with men who knew and loved their work, and who were comrades as good as I rarely found them in life, soon showed me the right ways.
The problem was simple enough. Whoever wanted to get news could not rely on their eyes and ears but had to know very precisely who the men were who could provide the news, and what the news itself meant.
"The main thing is that we always need to know before we begin asking," McGrady used to say dryly.
That was the basic principle and easy to grasp. When I was sent to a high official of the city for the first time to obtain important information, I had to know who the man was, what he had achieved and the importance of the matter. The newspaper itself provided the knowledge. You pressed an electric button and one of the pages appeared. He was given a slip of paper. On this slip you had written for example: John McAllister, treasurer of San Francisco. New construction of the waterworks. In a few minutes the page came back, numbered and signed with two blue folders: Treasurer McAllister - Waterworks. Their contents were the excerpts from the Examiner from all numbers in which articles or notes about McAllister and the waterworks had been brought. You scanned them and knew now what there was to know about the man and the matter. An invaluable tool was this excellent filing system, a true wishing-table for the newspaperman. Day after day, an editorial secretary did nothing but classify and register each newspaper edition by its individual articles and memos while keeping the files in pattern-like order. Nothing was missing, from the great politics to a statistic of all the big fires. Thus, every single work item became a source of knowledge. You learned every day, every hour of the day. The many people I met and the many things I had to deal with seemed to be perpetually changing, scurrying, colorful, life-tackling images. The newspaper became the idol; the reporters' room the home in which you often had your meal, always drank your glass of beer, where you felt at ease like nowhere else. At the time, I would have laughed at everybody who had told me I could voluntarily give up my life and work at the newspaper for even a short time period. And did it soon afterwards... There are even stronger stimuli. But they are rarely. Few kinds of creative work are able to capture a human body and soul like the newspaper service. A whirl of great life was it, in which I was. When you worked, you had reality under your fingers: the people as they lived and the things as they happened: new people and different things all the time. The newspaper in its service gave the look and experience, which other working men had to seek in their meager free hours. ...
This was the secret of the San Francisco Examiner, and it is and remains the secret of the press – of all the major newspapers of all countries and languages. The newspaper captivates the men , who serve it in a magic circle. It demands immeasurable manpower and devotion, but also gives immeasurable possibilities. ... It gives the men effervescent life and formidable power. The fleetingly written word of a newspaperman speaks to hundreds of thousands. It can influence a hundred thousand opinions and can do great things for good and evil. The one whose columns are open is the leader and guide and educator of thousands, without these thousands even knowing his name - "We are men without names," Allan McGrady once said with a smile in an evening chat. "There is a piece of romantic foolishness in each of us. Who knows us? Some publishers, some editors, some friends from the construction. The great majority, to whom we speak, doesn't know us. Whether I write an article as Allan McGrady oder Han Jakob Ypsilon is completely irrelevant - out of a thousand readers hardly anyone look for a name. We might as well be wearing numbers. The newspaper devours us with body and soul and personality." He was laughing. "And that bit of money? You dear God, the man in the skyscraper over there, who buys old iron cheaply and sells it expensively, earns ten times more than all of us together. And when we grow old and are no longer able, they throw us out of the newspaper temple and put us on the street. ... That's why we're all fools, dear children. I'm a fool, and you're a fool, Jack Ferguson, and you're also a fool, baby! " "Would you give up your newspaper work, Mac, if you inherited a million?" asked Jack Ferguson grinning, the oldest reporter.
"No, of course not!" "You see!" "Well, that's just foolishness!" growled Allan McGrady.
"Oh no," said Jack Ferguson almost solemnly. "It's more. It's the curious thing that drives the soldier forward. It's that weird thing that's high above money and money's worth - - -" " Grumpy, grumpy," said Allan McGrady. "Cheers children!" The curious thing was the enthusiasm. In it, the work became a game. For sport. ... One did not really do anything else the loving whole day, than to look for work and rejoice in the work. Our pleasure was even certainly somehow in related with the newspaper. When chatting in the reporter's room, they talked about the latest change in political circumstances or about the last criminal case or the pending prank of the city fathers of San Francisco, which had not yet been fully uncovered. It had simply become an obsession to be interested in only that which interested the newspaper.
+++ In addition to all the work in my baby days came special technical learning, which was to strongly influence my immediate future in a strange coincidence. I learned how to telegraph. At that time the people of the Examiner had the quirk of thoroughly learning the language of copper wire since this could be very important for the newspaper. Our teacher was an amiable American officer, senior lieutenant Green, the head of the military signal service in its California department. Three or four times a week we drove to the Presidio, the fort at the Golden Gate, and worked at the Signal Office there, before long with the lieutenant himself, then with Mr. Hastings, an old signal corps sergeant.
After the first lesson I was already greatly fascinated by the secrets of the electric current's devilry. The mechanism of the devices was indeed very simple. The interaction between the button, current and magnet wasn't anything particularly wonderful. The cumbersome forming of letters using dots and dashes even seemed rather boring at first. But as soon as I had reached a certain proficiency, the telegraph held a really strange allure for me. For now the dead dots and dashes became living language.
In contrast to the type of telegram reading from paper strips or from a printing machine that is common in Europe, the American telegraphist reads almost exclusively by ear. The click of the magnet speaks to him. He writes down what he hears as if by dictation. It reaches an average speed of 30 words per minute, which can be enhanced to forty or even fifty words by using the typewriter. My ear quickly became accustomed to the language of the telegraph. What at first had been a laborious counting of dots and dashes to hear the individual letters soon became a rapture for a new, clear, distinct writing. I heard how a telegraphist had to learn this, no longer the single letters, but the whole word sounded clearly. It was just like learning to read. At first you had to make an effort for each letter, then later on you had to assimilate a whole line into a single picture. A small example: When one telegraphist talks to another and wants to laugh over the wire, he clicks: ha-ha-ha. In morse code it looks like - .... .-ha.... .-ha.
On paper the four dots stand for "h" and the dot, dash of the "a" for something with no meaning and irrelevant. But as soon as we see them in the apparatus, they come alive, are distinctive, lead to the answering laughter right away.
Telegraphy was a great new game. The sensitive magnet reacted so blazingly fast to each press of the finger that the seemingly so complicated morse letters let themselves be formed faster than with ink and pen on paper. The name Erwin in telegraph writing looks very tricky: . Pause . .. Pause .- - pause .. Pause - . Word pause telegraphy can be done in three seconds!!
After three weeks the old sergeant Hastings already complimented me saying laughingly that I could apply now soon for a job with Western Union (that was the big American telegraph company), He was so delighted about his having successfully taught me that he then led me into the subterranean casemates of the coastal fort.
"But it's strictly in private!" he warned.
So I saw the famous mine table of the coastal defense of San Francisco. It was a camera obscura. On a huge table surface divided into minute squares, in the kasemate chamber the mirrors of the camera reflected part of the sea. It looked almost eerie when in the mirror image the sailing vessels and steamboats scurried over the black lines of the squares which all were numbered. It was terrifying! Because in times of war every square either meant a torpedo mine or a field of fire on which several cannons were carefully aimed at. If now an enemy ship slid over square 39, the mine officer pressed the electical button number 39 and the enemy ship was blown up, torn to pieces by a mine or ripped up by huge high explosive shells. Theoretically. It looked very nice.
And then we went to the canteen.
+ + + The newspaper Baby learned the first grasp of his new craft... But far more important than all the practical things was the great value to life that the newspaper bestowed as if in a game: the enthusiasm for the work! ...
unit 1
• Kapitel 2.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 2
Bei der amerikanischen Zeitung.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 3
Bob bei den Münchner Neuesten Nachrichten.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 4
– Die armen Teufel von deutschen Journalisten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 5
– Ein Münchner Zeitungspalast.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 6
– Im amerikanischen Reporterzimmer.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 7
– Wie das Zeitungsbaby sein Handwerk erlernte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 8
– Das Geheimnis der Presse.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 9
– Im Presidio.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 10
– Ich lerne telegraphieren.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 11
– Die Sprache des Kupferdrahts.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 12
– Telegraphisches Lachen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 13
– Vom großen Lebenswert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 17
Er nahm die Münchner Neuesten Nachrichten vom Tisch und zerknüllte sie.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 18
» You poor devil!« sagte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 19
»Du armer Teufel – du ganz armer Teufel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 20
Euer Bier ist ein Wunder!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 21
Eure Gemütlichkeit ist prachtvoll!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 22
Eure Kunst ist grandios!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 25
usw.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 26
Ich lachte und führte ihn in das Gebäude der Münchner Neuesten Nachrichten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 28
Bob bekam manches zu sehen und manches zu hören.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 30
»Gut!« sagte Bob draußen auf dem Korridor.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 31
»Verdammt gut!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 32
Die Leute verstehen ihr Geschäft.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 33
Sie haben ihre Arbeit lieb.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 35
unit 37
unit 42
»Gut – gut – verdammt gut!« sagte Bob.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 45
Ich glaube nicht, daß wir in der deutschen Zeitungswelt gerade amerikanische Reporterart haben.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 46
Ich weiß nicht einmal, ob es wünschenswert wäre, hätten wir sie.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 48
+++ Aeußerlich war nichts Märchenhaftes daran.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 54
Aber was, zum Teufel?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 55
Ueberall um mich klapperten Schreibmaschinen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 56
Die Türe wurde fortwährend aufgerissen, und Leute kamen herein und gingen hinaus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 57
Meine neuen Kollegen schwatzten und lachten – mitten in ihrer Arbeit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 59
Es roch nach frischer Druckerschwärze.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 66
Die geweißten Wände waren dicht bekritzelt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 68
Achtung, der Kerl beißt!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 69
!« Und mit einemmal waren alle die Männer verschwunden und der Raum leer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 70
Nur der Mann, der biß, war noch da.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 71
Er sah von seiner Arbeit auf und rief mich beim Namen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 72
»Mr.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 74
Ein Lächeln huschte über das scharfgeschnittene, glattrasierte Gesicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 76
Hier hat jeder seinen Spitznamen, und ich werde wohl Mac genannt werden bis zu meinem seligen Ende.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 78
Und nun will ich Sie ein bißchen orientieren, mein Sohn.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 79
Hier gibt's keine Herren und keine Knechte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 81
Sie ist es, die uns vereint.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 82
Wir sind eine große Familie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 84
Wir sind alle Blutsbrüder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 85
Wenn Sie etwas nicht wissen, fragen Sie Ihren Nachbar.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 88
Der Journalist muß einem im Blut stecken, und wer's nicht in sich hat, wird's nie!
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 89
Und nun –« Er teilte mir meine erste Arbeit beim Examiner zu.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 94
Er pflegte dann die Hände in die Hosentaschen zu stecken.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 95
Kurz, scharf, sacksiedegrob war seine Rede – » Baby!« (Das war ich!)
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 97
Das ist traurig und von Ihnen unrecht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 98
Wenn Ihnen ein Polizeisergeant – welcher war es?« »McBride.« »Aha – McBride.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 101
unit 102
Mann, strengen Sie ihren Witz an!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 104
»Na, die Sache ist übrigens bei uns besser als im Call.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 110
Immer neu und eigenartig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 111
Immer lockend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 112
Immer aufregend.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 113
Holtergepolter ging's mit der Arbeit den ganzen Tag hindurch bis spät in die Nacht hinein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 114
Das Zimmerchen in der Donnellystreet bei Madame Legrange sah mich nur zum Schlafen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 117
Aber die Zeitung hatte ihre eigene Art, zu lehren und lernen zu lassen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 118
Sie appellierte an Ehrgeiz und Ehrgefühl und Kraft, indem sie Vertrauen schenkte.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 123
Das Problem war einfach genug.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 126
Das war das Grundprinzip und leicht zu begreifen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 128
Das Wissen lieferte die Zeitung selbst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 129
Man drückte auf einen elektrischen Knopf, und einer der Pagen erschien.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 130
Der bekam einen Zettel.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 132
Neubau der Wasserwerke.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 135
Die überflog man und wußte nun über den Mann und die Sache, was zu wissen war.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 138
Nichts fehlte, von der großen Politik bis zu einer Statistik aller Großfeuer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 139
So wurde jede einzelne Arbeitsaufgabe zu einer Quelle des Wissens.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 140
Man lernte jeden Tag, jede Stunde im Tag.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 144
Und tat es bald darauf doch... Es gibt noch stärkere Reize.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 145
Aber sie sind selten.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 147
Ein Wirbel tollen Lebens war es, in dem ich stand.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 151
Die Zeitung bannt die Männer, die ihr dienen, in einen Zauberkreis.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 152
Sie verlangt Unerhörtes an Arbeitskraft und Hingebung, aber Unerhörtes gibt sie auch.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 153
Sie schenkt ihren Männern brausendes Leben und gewaltige Macht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 154
Das flüchtig hingeschriebene Wort eines Zeitungsmannes spricht zu Hunderttausenden.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 155
unit 157
»In jedem von uns steckt ein Stückchen romantischen Narrentums.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 158
Wer kennt uns?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 159
Einige Verleger, einige Redakteure, einige Freunde vom Bau.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 160
Die große Masse, zu der wir sprechen, kennt uns nicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 162
Wir könnten ebensogut Nummern tragen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 163
Die Zeitung verschluckt uns mit Haut und Haaren und Persönlichkeit.« Er lachte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 164
»Und das bißchen Geld?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 167
Deswegen sind wir im Grunde alle Narren, liebe Kinder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 169
unit 170
»Oh nein,« sagte Jack Ferguson fast feierlich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 171
»Es ist mehr.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 172
Es ist das kuriose Etwas, das den Soldaten vorwärtstreibt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 174
»Prosit Kinder!« Das kuriose Etwas war die Begeisterung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 175
In ihr wurde die Arbeit zum Spiel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 176
Zum Sport.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 178
Unser Vergnügen sogar hing sicherlich irgendwie mit der Zeitung zusammen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 180
unit 182
Ich lernte telegraphieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 187
Der Mechanismus der Instrumente war zwar sehr einfach.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 188
unit 191
Denn nun wurde aus den toten Punkten und Strichen lebendige Sprache.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 193
Das Klicken des Magneten spricht zu ihm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 194
Er schreibt das Gehörte nieder wie nach Diktat.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 196
Mein Ohr gewöhnte sich sehr rasch an die Sprache des Telegraphen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 199
Es war genau so wie Lesen lernen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 202
Im Morsealphabet sieht das so aus – .... .–ha.... .–ha.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 203
unit 205
Das Telegraphieren war ein famoses neues Spiel.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months ago
unit 207
Der Name Erwin in Telegraphenschrift sieht sehr verzwickt aus: .
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 208
Pause .
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 209
..
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 210
Pause .– –Pause ..
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 211
Pause –.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 212
Wortpause Telegraphieren läßt er sich in drei Sekunden!!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 215
»Aber 's ist strikt privatim!« mahnte er.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 216
So sah ich den berühmten Minentisch der Küstenverteidigung San Franziskos.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 217
Es war eine camera obscura.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 220
Es war unheimlich!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 223
Theoretisch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 224
Es sah sehr schön aus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 225
Und dann gingen wir in die Kantine.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 66  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 78  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 48  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 10  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 38  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 187  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 23  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 34  5 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 180  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 46  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 49  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 59  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 94  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 95  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 103  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 122  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 124  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 146  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 176  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 185  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 192  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 197  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 200  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 195  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 193  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 169  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 146  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 128  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 125  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 61  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 49  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 113  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 109  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 67  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 112  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 16  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 61  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 209  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 208  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 64  5 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 83  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 67  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 64  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 77  5 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 35  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 89  5 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 89  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 72  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 24  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 18  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 32  5 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 2  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 31  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 25  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 2  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 25  5 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 1  5 months, 1 week ago

• Kapitel 2.

Bei der amerikanischen Zeitung.

Bob bei den Münchner Neuesten Nachrichten. – Die armen Teufel von deutschen Journalisten. – Ein Münchner Zeitungspalast. – Im amerikanischen Reporterzimmer. – Wie das Zeitungsbaby sein Handwerk erlernte. – Das Geheimnis der Presse. – Im Presidio. – Ich lerne telegraphieren. – Die Sprache des Kupferdrahts. – Telegraphisches Lachen. – Vom großen Lebenswert.
Ein Jahr mag es her sein oder zwei, als ich in meiner Vaterstadt München einen alten amerikanischen Zeitungsfreund auf der Straße traf. Wir gingen zunächst zum Frühschoppen ins Hofbräuhaus, und gegen Ende der zweiten Maß weinte Bob beinahe. Zu traurig fand er es, daß einer, dem es einmal vergönnt gewesen war, die Nase in die Welt der amerikanischen Zeitung zu stecken, sich nun für deutsche Zeitungen plagen und schinden mußte!
Er nahm die Münchner Neuesten Nachrichten vom Tisch und zerknüllte sie.
» You poor devil!« sagte er. »Du armer Teufel – du ganz armer Teufel. Euer Bier ist ein Wunder! Eure Gemütlichkeit ist prachtvoll! Eure Kunst ist grandios! Aber eure Zeitungen – großer Gott, Mann, das ist doch keine Zeitung – das ist ja ein Miniaturblättchen – damn it, das ganze Dings da, das sich eine Zeitung nennt, hat nicht einmal Raum genug für einen einzigen anständigen Prozeßbericht!« Worauf er des weiteren ausführte, daß es ihm ja an und für sich schon unverständlich sei, wie irgend jemand irgend wo anders leben könne als in God's Country, im Lande Gottes, in den gottbegnadeten Vereinigten Staaten, denen zur absoluten Vollkommenheit nichts, aber auch nichts fehle, als das nicht weniger gottbegnadete Bier der Kunststadt München. Ein ewiges, mit sieben zolldicken Brettern vernageltes Geheimnis jedoch sei und bleibe es ihm, daß einer, dem es vergönnt gewesen sei – – usw. usw.
Ich lachte und führte ihn in das Gebäude der Münchner Neuesten Nachrichten.
Die Männer der Münchnerin sind allezeit gastfreundlich und gar liebenswürdig gegen ihre Mitarbeiter, wovon der, der dieses Buch schrieb, ein dankbar Lied zu singen weiß. Bob bekam manches zu sehen und manches zu hören. Wir plauderten mit dem Feuilletonredakteur über das Wesen des künstlerischen Feuilletons (das dem amerikanischen Journalisten ein Buch mit sieben Siegeln ist) – wir unterhielten uns mit dem Mann der inneren Politik über den Leitartikel (der den Zeitungen Amerikas etwas völlig Nebensächliches bedeutet) – wir suchten die Lokalredaktion heim, und ihr Schriftleiter benutzte natürlich die gute Gelegenheit, ein nettes Interview über die Münchner Eindrücke des amerikanischen Journalisten herauszuschinden.
»Gut!« sagte Bob draußen auf dem Korridor. »Verdammt gut! Die Leute verstehen ihr Geschäft. Sie haben ihre Arbeit lieb. Schade nur, daß den armen Teufeln so lächerlich wenig Zeilenraum zur Verfügung steht.« Dann blieb er kopfschüttelnd stehen. »Da sagt man immer, in Germany seien die Leute so überaus vorsichtig mit ihren Dollars!« brummte er. »Aber ich will gehängt werden, wenn's bei uns eine einzige Zeitung gibt, die ihre Leute auch nur annähernd so luxuriös beherbergt wie das Blättchen da! It's remarkable!«
Immer erstaunter wurde sein Kopfschütteln, je mehr der Räume der Redaktion er sah. Da waren Möbel, deren jedes Stück ein großer Künstler entworfen hatte, und Wunder von künstlerischen Schreibtischen und Beleuchtungskörper aus Bronze und kostbare Klubsessel und zauberhafte Tapeten und Perserteppiche und Jugendoriginale an den Wänden, und von der Hast und der Hetze des Zeitungslebens war äußerlich aber auch gar nichts zu sehen. Leise nur wie ein Summen drang das Dröhnen und Stampfen der riesigen Rotationsmaschinen aus dem betonumpanzerten Erdgeschoß. Dann plauderten wir wieder mit anderen Männern, und Bob sah, daß der Zeitungsgeist ein Weltgeist ist und die Zeitungsarbeit überall die gleiche, gewaltige, gigantische trotz aller Unterschiede der Art und des Formats. Er gluckste vor Wonne, als wir hinübergingen in das Reich der »Jugend« und Saal auf Saal der wundervollsten Kunstdruckmaschinen durchschritten, der vielen Dutzende stählerner Bilderzauberer, die noch viel wunderbarer sind als das größte Rotationsungetüm.
»Gut – gut – verdammt gut!« sagte Bob. »Aber wenn ich mich nicht sehr irre, so habt ihr doch eins nicht: Unseren amerikanischen Reporter...«
Da lachte ich und gab keine Antwort. Denn meine Zeiten amerikanischen Reportertums sind mir wie ein liebes Märchen erster Jugendliebe, und ein gar verknöcherter Kritikus muß der sein, der Zeiten erster Liebe kritisch urteilend betrachtet. Ich glaube nicht, daß wir in der deutschen Zeitungswelt gerade amerikanische Reporterart haben. Ich weiß nicht einmal, ob es wünschenswert wäre, hätten wir sie. Ich weiß nur, daß mein eigenes Erleben als zwanzigjähriger Lausbub im amerikanischen Zeitungsdienst mir eines der Jugendmärchen bedeutet, von denen man zehrt in den Tagen der Reife.
+++
Aeußerlich war nichts Märchenhaftes daran.
Der Tag eines Reporters beim San Francisco Examiner begann mit Arbeit, war ausgefüllt mit Arbeit, endete mit Arbeit, und des Nachts träumte man von der Arbeit.
Als ich zum erstenmal meinen Platz an einem Ecktisch im Reporterzimmer einnahm, kam ich mir so unendlich hilflos, so geistesarm, so über alle Maßen unfähig vor, daß ich am liebsten wieder davongelaufen wäre. Ich starrte auf das weiße Papier, das vor mir lag, betrachtete das Tintenfaß, sah mißtrauisch auf die Schreibmaschine auf dem kleinen Tischchen neben mir und wunderte mich, was in Dreikuckucksnamen ich nun eigentlich anfangen sollte. Zwölf Männern, dem gesamten Reporterstab der Zeitung, war ich hintereinander vorgestellt worden, und ein jeder hatte gelächelt und ein jeder irgend etwas Liebenswürdiges gesagt, um sich dann in keiner Weise mehr um meine gräßlich verlegene Wenigkeit zu bekümmern. So saß ich da, mit dem krampfhaften Gefühl, daß es die Aufgabe eines Reporters war, irgend etwas zu schreiben. Aber was, zum Teufel?
Ueberall um mich klapperten Schreibmaschinen. Die Türe wurde fortwährend aufgerissen, und Leute kamen herein und gingen hinaus. Meine neuen Kollegen schwatzten und lachten – mitten in ihrer Arbeit. Wie es möglich sein konnte, in diesem Höllenlärm einen vernünftigen Gedanken zu Papier zu bringen, war mir vorläufig ein Rätsel.
Es roch nach frischer Druckerschwärze. Papier bedeckte knöcheltief den Boden, allerlei Papier, handbeschrieben, maschinenbeschrieben, bedruckt. Die Wände entlang standen zerschnitzelte und tintenbeschmierte Pulte und kleine Tischchen, auf denen blanke Schreibmaschinen thronten. Die eine Schmalseite des Zimmers nahm der Bücherständer ein mit seinen unzähligen Nachschlagewerken. Eine Notiz in roter Tinte besagte, daß der Sünder, der dabei ertappt würde, ein Buch nicht an seinen richtigen Platz zurückzustellen, zu Pön und Strafe jedem Anwesenden ein Glas Bier zu stiften habe. Da waren Telephone an den Wänden und der elektrische Meldeapparat der Feuerwehr und das Spezialtelephon zum Polizeihauptquartier und eine Karte von San Franzisko und ein Tisch stand in der Zimmermitte, fußhoch mit den neuesten Zeitungen bedeckt. Ueberall glitzerten elektrische Glühbirnen, denn der Raum war zu groß, als daß das einzige Fenster selbst am hellsten Sonnentag ihn hätte erleuchten können. Die geweißten Wände waren dicht bekritzelt. Gegenüber der Eingangstüre stand in großen Lettern:
»Fremdling, der du hier eintrittst, mach schleunigst, daß du wieder hinauskommst, denn unsere Zeit brauchen wir selber!«
Und darunter deutete eine roh hingezeichnete Hand auf den großen Schreibtisch in der Ecke beim Fenster:
»Allan McGrady, Lokalredakteur, Oberbonze, Hohepriester! Achtung, der Kerl beißt!!«
Und mit einemmal waren alle die Männer verschwunden und der Raum leer. Nur der Mann, der biß, war noch da. Er sah von seiner Arbeit auf und rief mich beim Namen.
»Mr. McGrady?«
Allan McGradys scharfe Augen blinzelten vergnügt über die Ränder der goldenen Brille hinweg. Ein Lächeln huschte über das scharfgeschnittene, glattrasierte Gesicht. »Sagen Sie lieber gleich Mac zu mir, mein Sohn,« meinte er grinsend, »denn in ein paar Tagen tun Sie es doch. Hier hat jeder seinen Spitznamen, und ich werde wohl Mac genannt werden bis zu meinem seligen Ende. Ihren Spitznamen kann ich Ihnen übrigens prophezeien: als jüngster Reporter sind Sie und bleiben Sie das baby bis Einer kommt, der noch jünger und noch dümmer ist wie Sie!«
Ich muß ein sehr verblüfftes Gesicht gemacht haben –
»Wenn ich sage dumm, so meine ich das natürlich nur im Reportersinn, und hoffentlich werden Sie auch in diesem Sinne in etlichen Monaten nicht mehr dumm sein. Und nun will ich Sie ein bißchen orientieren, mein Sohn. Hier gibt's keine Herren und keine Knechte. Wir sind alle zusammen Arbeiter im Dienste der Zeitung, und in unserem Leben darf und kann es nichts Wichtigeres geben als die Zeitung. Sie ist es, die uns vereint. Wir sind eine große Familie. Wir teilen unsere Zigarren und unseren Whisky, manchmal sogar unser Geld – nun, Sie werden das sehr bald herausbekommen. Wir sind alle Blutsbrüder. Wenn Sie etwas nicht wissen, fragen Sie Ihren Nachbar. Wenn Sie etwas bedrückt, kommen Sie zu mir... Halten Sie vor allem den Kopf hoch und lassen Sie sich nicht verblüffen! Sie werden ganz von selber sehen und hören und lernen – und weder ich noch irgend jemand kann Ihnen da viel helfen. Der Journalist muß einem im Blut stecken, und wer's nicht in sich hat, wird's nie! Und nun –«
Er teilte mir meine erste Arbeit beim Examiner zu.
Um neun Uhr morgens versammelte sich die Reporterschar im Reporterzimmer, während Mac schon eine Viertelstunde vorher sich an seinem Schreibtisch eingefunden hatte. Eine selbstverständliche Voraussetzung war natürlich, daß jeder der »Herren des Stabes« nicht nur das eigene Blatt, sondern auch die anderen Morgenzeitungen San Franziskos beim Frühstück gründlich gelesen hatte. Diese morgendliche Konferenz hatte immer eine lustige und eine etwas weniger lustige Seite. Man lachte und plauderte und spielte allerlei Schabernack, Mac so gut wie wir alle, bis er auf einmal zu Mr. Allan McGrady wurde und seine berühmte Geste der Ernsthaftigkeit annahm. Er pflegte dann die Hände in die Hosentaschen zu stecken.
Kurz, scharf, sacksiedegrob war seine Rede –
» Baby!« (Das war ich!) der » Call« (das war eine Morgenzeitung San Franziskos) hat Ihre Geschichte über den Mann, der total betrunken im Citygefängnis eingeliefert wurde und in dessen Taschen man 15 000 Dollars fand, ebenfalls gebracht. Das ist traurig und von Ihnen unrecht. Wenn Ihnen ein Polizeisergeant – welcher war es?«
»McBride.«
»Aha – McBride. Wenn Ihnen McBride guten Stoff erzählt, so sorgen Sie gefälligst dafür, daß er von da ab seinen Mund hält und vor allem den Call-Leuten gegenüber nichts ausplaudert. Wie Sie das machen, ist mir egal!«
»Aber Mac, Sie haben neulich doch geschimpft wie unsinnig, als ich dem andern Sergeanten fünf Dollars gab, damit – –«
»Ganz richtig, mein Sohn! Das macht man auch nicht mit Geld, denn Geld ist rar, sondern mit Liebenswürdigkeit und Schlauheit. Mann, strengen Sie ihren Witz an! Bin ich vielleicht eine Amme und in alle Ewigkeit verdammt, Sie an dem Quell der simpelsten Weisheit lutschen zu lassen?« Ich war tief beschämt.
»Na, die Sache ist übrigens bei uns besser als im Call. Johnny (das war Chefredakteur Lascelles) läßt Ihnen sagen, die Geschichte sei fidel und nicht übel ...«
Das war McGradys Art der Anerkennung.
So wurde allmorgendlich Spalte für Spalte der Arbeit des vorhergehenden Tages durchbesprochen und einem immer wieder eingehämmert, daß es für den, der im Reporterzimmer hausen wollte, nichts auf der Welt gab und geben durfte als ein einziges Interesse und eine einzige Liebe: Die Zeitung und die Interessen der Zeitung. Erstens die Zeitung und zweitens die Zeitung und drittens überhaupt nichts als die Zeitung!
Der Lausbub fühlte sich in der Luft des Reporterzimmers bald so wohl wie ein Fisch im Wasser. Weil er jung war und einen Schuß Enthusiasmus im Blut hatte, schien ihm das, was in Wirklichkeit ernstes und hartes Schaffen war, ein lustiges, kinderleichtes Spiel. Immer neu und eigenartig. Immer lockend. Immer aufregend. Holtergepolter ging's mit der Arbeit den ganzen Tag hindurch bis spät in die Nacht hinein. Das Zimmerchen in der Donnellystreet bei Madame Legrange sah mich nur zum Schlafen. Im Eifer merkte ich gar nicht, daß ich ein »hart gerittener Gaul« war und beim Examiner in einem einzigen Tag mehr lernen mußte, als das anspruchsvollste Professorenkollegium eines Gymnasiums in einem ganzen Wochenpensum verlangt hätte...
Denn der gute Wille und das bißchen Talent taten's noch lange nicht. Eine ungeheure Menge von Material mußte ich verdauen und einen Wust faktischen Wissens mir aneignen, vor dem ich entsetzt zurückgefahren wäre, hätte ich auch nur eine Ahnung gehabt, daß ich ja gar nicht spielte, sondern »büffelte«. Aber die Zeitung hatte ihre eigene Art, zu lehren und lernen zu lassen. Sie appellierte an Ehrgeiz und Ehrgefühl und Kraft, indem sie Vertrauen schenkte. McGrady ließ es mich nie fühlen, daß ich Anfänger und Lehrling war, und seine leitende Hand führte weiche Zügel. Vom ersten Tag an bekam ich wie alle anderen meine Aufgaben zugeteilt und arbeitete in allen Abteilungen des Nachrichtendienstes. Ich wurde aufs Polizeihauptquartier geschickt und zu den einzelnen Polizeisergeanten, assistierte bei der Berichterstattung in großen Kriminalfällen, wurde bei den lokalen politischen Größen eingeführt und im Hafendienst verwendet. Ein lächelnd gegebener Rat, wie von Gleichstehendem zu Gleichstehendem, als wortkarge Selbstverständlichkeit hingeworfen, eine lustige Derbheit, die niemals etwas Verletzendes hatte, ein Wort hier, ein Wink dort, die stete Fühlung vor allem mit Männern, die ihre Arbeit kannten und liebten und gute Kameraden waren, wie ich sie im Leben selten gefunden, zeigten mir bald die richtigen Wege.
Das Problem war einfach genug. Wer Nachrichten einholen wollte, durfte sich nicht auf Auge und Ohr verlassen, sondern mußte sehr genau wissen, wer die Männer waren, die Nachrichten geben konnten, und was die Nachrichten selbst bedeuteten.
»Die Hauptsache müssen wir immer schon wissen, ehe wir zu fragen beginnen,« pflegte McGrady trocken zu sagen.
Das war das Grundprinzip und leicht zu begreifen. Wenn ich zum erstenmal zu einem hohen Beamten der Stadt geschickt wurde, um eine wichtige Auskunft einzuholen, so mußte ich wissen, wer der Mann war, was er geleistet hatte, welche Tragweite die Angelegenheit in Frage hatte. Das Wissen lieferte die Zeitung selbst. Man drückte auf einen elektrischen Knopf, und einer der Pagen erschien. Der bekam einen Zettel. Auf diesen Zettel hatte man zum Beispiel geschrieben: John McAIlister, Schatzmeister San Franziskos. Neubau der Wasserwerke. In wenigen Minuten kam der Page zurück, mit zwei blauen Aktenmappen, numeriert und überschrieben: Schatzmeister McAllister – Wasserwerke. Ihr Inhalt waren die Ausschnitte aus dem Examiner aus allen Nummern, in denen Artikel oder Notizen über McAllister und die Wasserwerke gebracht worden waren. Die überflog man und wußte nun über den Mann und die Sache, was zu wissen war. Ein Hilfsmittel von unschätzbarem Wert war diese ausgezeichnete Registratur, ein wahres Tischlein-deck-dich für den Zeitungsmann. Ein Redaktionssekretär hatte tagaus tagein nichts zu tun, als jede Zeitungsausgabe in ihren einzelnen Artikeln und Notizen zu klassifizieren, zu registrieren, und die Akten in musterhafter Ordnung zu halten. Nichts fehlte, von der großen Politik bis zu einer Statistik aller Großfeuer. So wurde jede einzelne Arbeitsaufgabe zu einer Quelle des Wissens. Man lernte jeden Tag, jede Stunde im Tag. Die vielen Menschen, mit denen ich zusammenkam, und die vielen Dinge, mit denen ich mich beschäftigen mußte, waren wie immer neu vorbeihuschende, farbenbunte, lebenspackende Bilder. Die Zeitung wurde zum Götzen; das Reporterzimmer zum Heim, in dem man oft aß, immer sein Glas Bier trank, wo man sich wohl fühlte wie nirgends. Ich würde jeden ausgelacht haben damals, der mir gesagt hätte, daß ich Zeitungsleben und Zeitungsarbeit auch nur auf eine kurze Spanne Zeit freiwillig aufgeben könnte. Und tat es bald darauf doch... Es gibt noch stärkere Reize. Aber sie sind selten. Wenige Arten tätigen Schaffens wohl vermögen einen Menschen so mit Leib und Seele einzufangen wie der Zeitungsdienst. Ein Wirbel tollen Lebens war es, in dem ich stand. Wenn man arbeitete, hatte man die Wirklichkeit unter den Fingern: die Menschen, wie sie lebten, und die Dinge, wie sie sich zutrugen: immer neue Menschen und immer andere Dinge. Das Schauen und Erleben, das andere Männer der Arbeit in kargen Freistunden suchen mußten, gab die Zeitung im Dienst.
Das war das Geheimnis des San Francisco Examiners, und es ist und bleibt das Geheimnis der Presse – aller großen Zeitungen aller Länder und Sprachen. Die Zeitung bannt die Männer, die ihr dienen, in einen Zauberkreis. Sie verlangt Unerhörtes an Arbeitskraft und Hingebung, aber Unerhörtes gibt sie auch. Sie schenkt ihren Männern brausendes Leben und gewaltige Macht. Das flüchtig hingeschriebene Wort eines Zeitungsmannes spricht zu Hunderttausenden. Es vermaghunderttausend Meinungen zu beeinflussen, vermag Großes in Gutem und Bösem. Wem ihre Spalten offenstehen, der ist Führer und Lenker und Erzieher von Tausenden, ohne daß diese Tausende auch nur seinen Namen kennen –
»Wir sind Männer ohne Namen,« sagte Allan McGrady einmal lächelnd in einer abendlichen Plauderstunde. »In jedem von uns steckt ein Stückchen romantischen Narrentums. Wer kennt uns? Einige Verleger, einige Redakteure, einige Freunde vom Bau. Die große Masse, zu der wir sprechen, kennt uns nicht. Ob ich unter einen Artikel Allan McGrady schreibe oder Hans Jakob Ypsilon, ist ganz gleichgültig – von tausend Lesern sieht kaum einer nach dem Namen. Wir könnten ebensogut Nummern tragen. Die Zeitung verschluckt uns mit Haut und Haaren und Persönlichkeit.« Er lachte. »Und das bißchen Geld? Du lieber Gott, der Mann im Wolkenkratzer da drüben, der altes Eisen billig kauft und teuer verkauft, verdient zehnmal mehr als wir alle zusammen. Und wenn wir einmal alt werden und nicht mehr können, dann wirft man uns aus dem Zeitungstempel und setzt uns auf die Straße. Deswegen sind wir im Grunde alle Narren, liebe Kinder. Ich bin ein Narr, und du bist ein Narr, Jack Ferguson, und du bist auch ein Narr, baby!«
»Würdest du deine Arbeit an der Zeitung aufgeben, Mac, wenn du eine Million erbtest?« fragte grinsend Jack Ferguson, der älteste Reporter.
»Nein, natürlich nicht!«
»Siehst du!« »Well, das ist eben das Narrentum!« brummte Allan McGrady.
»Oh nein,« sagte Jack Ferguson fast feierlich. »Es ist mehr. Es ist das kuriose Etwas, das den Soldaten vorwärtstreibt. Es ist jenes sonderbare Etwas, das hoch über Geld und Geldeswert steht – – –«
»Schrumm, schrumm,« sagte Allan McGrady. »Prosit Kinder!«
Das kuriose Etwas war die Begeisterung. In ihr wurde die Arbeit zum Spiel. Zum Sport. Man tat eigentlich nichts anderes den ganzen lieben Tag, als nach Arbeit zu suchen und sich der Arbeit zu freuen. Unser Vergnügen sogar hing sicherlich irgendwie mit der Zeitung zusammen. Wenn man im Reporterzimmer plauderte, unterhielt man sich über die neueste Wendung in den politischen Verhältnissen oder über den letzten Kriminalfall oder den schwebenden, noch nicht ganz aufgedeckten Spitzbubenstreich der Stadtväter San Franziskos. Es war einem eben zur Manie geworden, sich nur für das zu interessieren, was die Zeitung interessierte.
+++
Zu all der Arbeit in den Babyzeiten kam noch besonderes technisches Lernen, das in sonderbarer Zufälligkeit meine nächste Zukunft stark beeinflussen sollte. Ich lernte telegraphieren. Die Examinerleute hatten damals die Marotte, die Sprache des Kupferdrahtes gründlich zu erlernen, denn das konnte für die Zeitung sehr wichtig sein. Unser Lehrmeister war ein liebenswürdiger amerikanischer Offizier, Oberleutnant Green, der Chef des militärischen Signaldienstes im Departement von Kalifornien. Drei, viermal in der Woche fuhren wir zum Presidio, dem Fort beim Goldenen Tor, und arbeiteten dort im Signalbureau, bald mit dem Leutnant selbst, bald mit Mr. Hastings, einem alten Signalkorpssergeanten.
Nach den ersten Lektionen schon fesselten mich die Geheimnisse der Teufelei elektrischen Stromes gewaltig. Der Mechanismus der Instrumente war zwar sehr einfach. Die Wechselwirkung zwischen Taster, Strom und Magnet hatte nichts besonders Wunderbares. Das mühselige Formen von Buchstaben durch Punkte und Striche schien zuerst sogar langweilig. Aber sobald ich eine gewisse Fertigkeit erreicht hatte, übte das Telegrapheninstrument eine ganz merkwürdige Lockung auf mich aus. Denn nun wurde aus den toten Punkten und Strichen lebendige Sprache.
Im Gegensatz zu der in Europa üblichen Art des Telegrammlesens vom Papierstreifen oder durch Druckmaschine liest der amerikanische Telegraphist fast nur durch Gehör. Das Klicken des Magneten spricht zu ihm. Er schreibt das Gehörte nieder wie nach Diktat. Er erreicht dabei eine Geschwindigkeit von durchschnittlich 30 Worten in der Minute, die sich bei Benutzung der Schreibmaschine auf vierzig, ja sogar fünfzig Worte steigern läßt. Mein Ohr gewöhnte sich sehr rasch an die Sprache des Telegraphen. Was zuerst ein mühsames Zählen der Punkte und Striche gewesen war, um die einzelnen Buchstaben herauszuhören, wurde bald zum Begeistertsein über eine neue, klare, deutliche Schrift. Ich hörte, wie ein Telegraphist das lernen muß, nicht mehr die einzelnen Buchstaben, sondern deutlich erklang das ganze Wort. Es war genau so wie Lesen lernen. Zuerst mußte man sich um den Buchstaben mühen, um dann später eine ganze Zeile in einem einzigen Bild in sich aufzunehmen. Ein kleines Beispiel:
Wenn ein Telegraphist mit einem andern sich über den Draht hinweg unterhält und lachen will, dann klickt er: ha–ha–ha. Im Morsealphabet sieht das so aus –
.... .–ha.... .–ha.
Auf dem Papier sind die vier Punkte des h und der Punkt, Strich des a etwas Totes und Nichtssagendes. Sobald wir sie aber im Instrument erblicken, werden sie lebendig, sind charakteristisch, lösen sofort das antwortende Gelächter aus.
Das Telegraphieren war ein famoses neues Spiel. Der empfindliche Magnet reagierte so blitzschnell auf jeden Fingerdruck, daß sich die anscheinend so komplizierten Morsebuchstaben schneller formen ließen als auf dem Papier mit Tinte und Feder. Der Name Erwin in Telegraphenschrift sieht sehr verzwickt aus:
. Pause . .. Pause .– –Pause .. Pause –. Wortpause
Telegraphieren läßt er sich in drei Sekunden!!
Nach drei Wochen bereits erwies mir der alte Sergeant Hastings das Kompliment, mir lachend zu sagen, daß ich mich jetzt schon bald um eine Anstellung bei der Western Union (das war die große amerikanische Telegraphen-Kompagnie) bewerben könne. So vergnügt war er über seinen Lehrmeister-Erfolg, daß er mich dann in die unterirdischen Kasematten des Küstenforts führte.
»Aber 's ist strikt privatim!« mahnte er.
So sah ich den berühmten Minentisch der Küstenverteidigung San Franziskos. Es war eine camera obscura. Auf eine ungeheure, in winzige Quadrate eingeteilte Tischplatte in der Kasemattenkammer reflektierten die Kameraspiegel ein Stück Meer. Es sah fast unheimlich aus, wenn die Segler und die Dampfer im Spiegelbild über die schwarzen Linien der Quadrate huschten, die alle Nummern trugen. Es war unheimlich! Denn in Kriegszeiten bedeutete jedes Quadrat entweder eine Torpedomine oder ein Schußfeld, auf das mehrere Geschütze sorgfältig einvisiert waren. Glitt nun ein feindliches Schiff über Quadrat 39, so drückte der Minenoffizier auf den elektrischen Knopf Nummer 39, und das feindliche Schiff flog in die Luft, von einer Mine in Stücke gerissen oder von riesigen Sprenggranaten zerfetzt. Theoretisch. Es sah sehr schön aus.
Und dann gingen wir in die Kantine.
+++
Das Zeitungsbaby lernte die ersten Griffe seines neuen Handwerks ... Aber weit wichtiger als all das Praktische war der große Lebenswert, den die Zeitung wie im Spiel schenkte: Die Begeisterung für die Arbeit!