de-en  Goethe_de_Kinder-Unis
Children's Universities: Play-acting Student for one Day.

Education can be fun - this is the message conveyed by the so-called children's universities; Professors answer the questions of their young listeners in lectures and by doing so, learn more themselves.

Even Miranda Jakiša didn't at first know an answer for this question: "when do vampires actually celebrate their birthday?" Although the professor for slavic literature knows a lot about vampires.

She has sometimes given a few lectures for children, 'But the question was extremely interesting,' Jakiša said: 'Do vampires celebrate their human birthday or do they celebrate the day they became vampires?'

The children's lecture at the Humboldt University in Berlin then dealt with the question of how vampires can actually be "undead" and how this is related to their lives.

Professor Jakiša is inspired by such things: "The children ask questions which can lead to the discovery of new things." There have been such universities in Germany for very young listeners for almost fifteen years.

Children can attend these events as soon as they are seven years old.

You will then hear a lecture from a female professor on a specific topic: "Why do volcanoes spit fire?" Why are there poor people and rich people? Why do we love vampires? Or, why isn't school fun?

Often it is questions that the children themselves have asked; Professors try to answer these apparently simple questions with their expert knowledge.

At the same time, they have to use simple words so that all children also understand the answer.

Children's-Unis are supposed to encourage children to become curious about the world of science.

And professors should learn how to explain complicated topics in simple language.

Both sides can also learn a lot from each other.

The first Children's-Uni in Germany was founded in Tübingen in 2002; at that time, Ulla Steuerngel and Ulrich Janßen, journalists of a local Tübingen newspaper, had the idea of bringing scientists and children together.

Those two look after the children's university in Tübingen to this day.

They have meanwhile written three books about it and received an award from the federal president for their idea.

When you ask Ulla Steuernagel how she came up with the idea, she says: "it was in the air." A short time before, a large study on the topic education, the PISA-study, had been published, and Germany had done poorly; "At the time, everybody was looking for ideas how to be able to interest children more for education", Steuernagel says.

And how are lectures supposed to help with this? After all, it is not easy for children to listen to a difficult lecture for an hour.

"We deliberately wanted this old-fashioned form of lecture," says Steuernagel, "because that impresses children."

In Tübingen you can enter the rooms of the university, you will receive a student card and listen to the lecture of a professor.
„Children love to play-act at being students," says Steuernagel, " and furthermore, in this way the event differs even more so from a school.“

As in school, it should not be at children's universities, so there are no grades or exams.

Since 2002, the idea of children's universities has gone around the whole world.

There are nowadays such organisations in Japan, Romania, Turkey and Brazil; the European Network for Children's Universities, Eucu (dot).net meanwhile has members in 29 countries.

Every year, by Eucu.net’s counts, children's universities reach about 15,000 scientists and 500,000 children worldwide.

"But there is not a children's university," says Karoline Iber of the children's office of the University of Vienna, which organizes the network of children's universities.

Similar projects emerged in other countries at the same time as the children‘s university in Tübingen, often following an entirely different approach.

In Vienna for example, there is a children's university Vienna once a year, one of the biggest children's universities ever.

Children do not only attend lectures there but also work together with scientists in workshops and seminars.

Approximately 4000 children participate every summer.

More and more often children's universities take place in nature.

On the northern German island Föhr, for example, children explore the lives of humans and animals on an island.

In Austria researchers visit a glacier, and do so together with children from neighbouring villages. This is how the children learn about nature and the environment in which they live.

In Russia, there is a mobile children's university which visits schools in remote areas of the country.

An online-children's university was initiated for them as well: on the Goethe institute's website in Russia, children can watch videos and solve problems; they learn something about the work of scientists and practise German at the same time.

"The task of children's universities is now to open up the universities," says Karoline Iber.

On the one hand, scientists learn in that way to express complex aspects in simple terms; on the other hand children in whose family nobody has studied so far are supposed to be made curious for studying at the university.

At least, at Vienna University this seems to be working, meanwhile young people begin their studies here who attended their first lectures at a children's university.
unit 1
Kinder-Universitäten: Einen Tag Student spielen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 7
Kinder können diese Veranstaltungen besuchen, sobald sie sieben Jahre alt sind.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 9
Warum gibt es Arme und Reiche?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 10
Warum lieben wir Vampire?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 11
Oder warum ist Schule doof?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 13
Gleichzeitig müssen sie einfach sprechen, damit alle Kinder die Antwort auch verstehen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 14
Durch Kinder-Unis sollen Kinder neugierig werden auf die Welt der Wissenschaft.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 15
Und Professoren sollen lernen, wie sie komplizierte Themen einfach erklären können.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 16
Beide Seiten können also viel voneinander lernen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 18
Bis heute betreuen die beiden in Tübingen die Kinder-Unis.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 21
Und wie sollen Vorlesungen dabei helfen?
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 22
unit 27
Die Idee der Kinder-Unis ist seit 2002 um die ganze Welt gegangen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 34
Jeden Sommer nehmen daran etwa 4000 Kinder teil.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 35
Immer häufiger finden Kinder-Unis in der Natur statt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 38
So erfahren die Kinder etwas über die Natur und über die Umgebung, in der sie leben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 1 week ago
unit 39
In Russland gibt es eine mobile Kinder-Uni, die Schulen in entlegenen Gebieten des Landes besucht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 41
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 42  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 25  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 31  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 29  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 14  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 11  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 7  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 21  5 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 37  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 4  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 6  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 34  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 17  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 21  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 14  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 2  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 12  5 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 15  5 months, 1 week ago

Kinder-Universitäten: Einen Tag Student spielen.

Bildung kann Spaß machen – das vermitteln die sogenannten Kinder-Unis; Professoren beantworten in Vorlesungen die Fragen ihrer jungen Zuhörer und lernen dabei selbst dazu.

Selbst Miranda Jakiša wusste auf diese Frage erst einmal keine Antwort: „Wann feiern Vampire eigentlich Geburtstag?“

Dabei kennt sich die Professorin für Slawische Literaturen mit Vampiren bestens aus.

Sie hat auch schon einige Vorlesungen für Kinder gehalten, „Aber die Frage war extrem interessant“, sagt Jakiša: Feiern Vampire ihren menschlichen Geburtstag oder feiern sie den Tag, als sie Vampire wurden?

In der Kinder-Vorlesung der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin ging es daraufhin um die Frage, wie Vampire eigentlich „untot“ sein können und wie das mit ihrem Leben zusammenhängt.

So etwas begeistert Professorin Jakiša: „Die Kinder stellen Fragen, durch die man wirklich Neues entdecken kann.“

Seit fast 15 Jahren gibt es solche Universitäten für ganz junge Zuhörer in Deutschland.

Kinder können diese Veranstaltungen besuchen, sobald sie sieben Jahre alt sind.

Sie hören dann einen Vortrag von einer Professorin oder einem Professor zu einem bestimmten Thema: Warum spucken Vulkane Feuer? Warum gibt es Arme und Reiche? Warum lieben wir Vampire? Oder warum ist Schule doof?

Oft sind es Fragen, die Kinder selbst gestellt haben; Professoren versuchen dann, die scheinbar einfachen Fragen mit ihrem Fachwissen zu beantworten.

Gleichzeitig müssen sie einfach sprechen, damit alle Kinder die Antwort auch verstehen.

Durch Kinder-Unis sollen Kinder neugierig werden auf die Welt der Wissenschaft.

Und Professoren sollen lernen, wie sie komplizierte Themen einfach erklären können.

Beide Seiten können also viel voneinander lernen.

Die erste Kinder-Uni in Deutschland fand 2002 in Tübingen statt; Ulla Steuernagel und Ulrich Janßen, Journalisten einer Tübinger Lokalzeitung, hatten damals die Idee, Wissenschaftler und Kinder zusammenzubringen.

Bis heute betreuen die beiden in Tübingen die Kinder-Unis.

Sie haben inzwischen drei Bücher darüber geschrieben und für ihre Idee eine Auszeichnung des Bundespräsidenten erhalten.

Wenn man Ulla Steuernagel fragt, wie sie auf die Idee gekommen ist, sagt sie: „Es lag in der Luft.“

Kurz zuvor war eine große Studie zum Thema Bildung erschienen, die PISA-Studie, und Deutschland hatte schlecht abgeschnitten; „Alle suchten damals nach Ideen, wie man Kinder wieder mehr für Bildung interessieren könnte“, so Steuernagel.

Und wie sollen Vorlesungen dabei helfen? Schließlich ist es für Kinder nicht einfach, eine Stunde lang einem schwierigen Vortrag zuzuhören.

„Wir wollten ganz bewusst diese altmodische Form der Vorlesung“, sagt Steuernagel, „denn das beeindruckt Kinder“.

In Tübingen dürfen sie in die Räume der Universität, sie erhalten einen Studentenausweis und lauschen dem Vortrag eines Professors.
„Kinder lieben es, Student zu spielen“, sagt Steuernagel, „und außerdem unterscheidet sich die Veranstaltung so stärker von der Schule“.

Wie in der Schule soll es bei Kinder-Unis nämlich nicht sein; deshalb gibt es auch keine Noten oder Prüfungen.

Die Idee der Kinder-Unis ist seit 2002 um die ganze Welt gegangen.

Inzwischen gibt es solche Veranstaltungen auch in Japan, in Rumänien, in der Türkei und in Brasilien; das Europäische Netzwerk für Kinder-Unis Eucu(dot).net hat inzwischen Mitglieder in 29 Ländern.

Jedes Jahr erreichen Kinder-Unis laut Zählungen von Eucu(dot)net weltweit etwa 15 000 Wissenschaftler und 500 000 Kinder.

„Aber es gibt nicht die eine Kinder-Uni“, betont Karoline Iber vom Kinderbüro der Universität Wien, die das Netzwerk der Kinder-Unis mit organisiert.

Zeitgleich zu der Tübinger Kinder-Uni seien ähnliche Projekte in anderen Ländern entstanden – die oft ganz anders aussehen.

In Wien gibt es zum Beispiel einmal im Jahr die Kinder-Uni Wien, eine der größten Kinder-Unis überhaupt.

Dort hören Kinder nicht nur Vorlesungen, sondern sie arbeiten auch in Workshops und Seminaren mit Wissenschaftlern zusammen.

Jeden Sommer nehmen daran etwa 4000 Kinder teil.

Immer häufiger finden Kinder-Unis in der Natur statt.

Auf der norddeutschen Insel Föhr zum Beispiel erforschen Kinder das Leben von Menschen und Tieren auf einer Insel.

In Österreich besuchen Forscher einen Gletscher, und zwar gemeinsam mit Kindern aus den benachbarten Dörfern. So erfahren die Kinder etwas über die Natur und über die Umgebung, in der sie leben.

In Russland gibt es eine mobile Kinder-Uni, die Schulen in entlegenen Gebieten des Landes besucht.

Außerdem wurde für sie eine Online-Kinder-Uni ins Leben gerufen: Auf der Internetseite der Goethe-Institute in Russland können Kinder Videos anschauen und Aufgaben lösen; sie lernen etwas über die Arbeit von Wissenschaftlern und gleichzeitig üben sie die deutsche Sprache.

„Die Aufgabe von Kinder-Unis ist es inzwischen, die Universitäten zu öffnen“, sagt Karoline Iber.

Zum einen lernen Wissenschaftler so, komplizierte Dinge einfach zu erklären; zum anderen sollen Kinder neugierig auf eine Studium gemacht werden, in deren Familie bisher niemand studiert hat.

An der Uni Wien scheint das auch zu klappen: Inzwischen beginnen hier junge Menschen ihr Studium, die ihre ersten Vorlesungen in einer Kinder-Uni gehört haben.