de-en  Forster's_Reise_um_die_Welt_Seite 6-15_Teil_2.
In the afternoon at six o'clock, the city of Santa Cruz on Madeira lay straight ahead of us.

Here we saw the mountains intersected by a multitude of cliffs and deep valleys with many country houses situated on their ridges, whose extremely charming location between vineyards and high cypresses, gave the region a very romantic appearance.

We were moved to the roadsted of Funchal by boats because it was totally windless, and we dropped anchor only in the dark of night.

Early on the 29th, we were very pleasantly surprised by the picturesque sight of the town of Funchal.

It is situated around the roadstead on the gently rising slope of the foothills and has the form of an amphitheatre.

Because of this location all the buildings and houses have a more favourable appearance; they are almost all painted white; many have two storeys and have flat roofs, giving them an appearance and similarity to those found in eastern architecture, which our narrow houses here in England, with their high, converging, slanting roofs with their rows of chimneys, seem to be missing completely.

On the shore one sees several batteries and platforms with cannons, the roadstead is also covered from an old fort situated atop a steep, black rock, which is surrounded by water at high tide und which the English call the Loo-Rock.

There is still another fort, St. Joanno do Pico, past the city.

The nearby elevations, on which vineyards, fenced-in lots, plantations and shrubbery as well as country houses and various churches are to be seen, make the beauty of the countryside complete.

All that inspired the idea of a charming island and called up memories of Semiramis' hanging gardens.

At seven o'clock, a boat came to us, which is called Pratique-boat, and which had a Captain do Sal on board.

This officer is one of the two local public health officials who decide whether ships that arrive from the Barbary or the Levant or from other areas suspected of being subject to the plague must be quarantined.

He inquired about our state of health and from which country we were coming, and learned everything he wanted to know.

Shortly afterwards, we touched land and went with our captains to Mr. Loughnan, an English merchant, who, by virtue of contracts, provides all royal ships arriving here, with the essential necessities.

The recently appointed Consul, Mr Murray, had not arrived yet.

Mr Loughnan, however, welcomed us with hospitality and civility that was a credit to him and to his nation.

The city does not nearly match the perception that its exterior appearance arouses from the roadstead, for the streets are narrow and poorly paved and dirty. Admittedly, the houses are built with cut stone or bricks but they are dark inside.
Only those houses that belong to English merchants or other more distinguished residents are furnished with glass windows. The rest of the inhabitants generally have shutters made of slats that are attached to hasps above and can be opened as windows, and even lifted out if necessary.

The downstairs rooms are designated mainly for servant's flats, general stores and warehouses.

As for the churches and monasteries, they are poorly constructed buildings that do not reveal any profound knowledge of architecture.

Their interior is inelegant, for the little light that comes in here from outside makes nothing visible to the eye except a large amount of tinsel decorations that are intentionally gothic.

The Franciscan monastery is nice and spacious, but its garden seemed to be somewhat neglected.

The nuns of St. Clara welcomed us very politely at the lattice of their consulting room, but later sent some old women to offer the bunches of flowers they had made up.

We subsequently went for a walk with Mr. Loughnan to his country house, situated on a hill an English mile from the city, and there found ourselves in the pleasant company of the most noble English merchants of Madeira.

Our captains went on board in the evening again. However, we gladly took advantage of Mr. Loughnan's courteous offer to stay at his house during our short layover in Madera.

The following morning we started to investigate the inland parts of the island and continued this pursuit the following day.

At 5 o'clock in the morning we walked uphill along a creek that led us into the interior mountainous areas.

At 1 p.m. we arrived at a chestnut grove located not far below the highest peak of this island, about 6 English miles from Mr Loughnan's manor.

The air was considerably cooler here; and since we liked to take the shortest way back, we hired a black man who, within one and a half hour, took us back to our gracious host.

On the following day arrangements were made for our departure and, deeply affected, I now left this lovely country and these generous friends who know how to appreciate, feel and enjoy the delight of seeing their fellow man happy.

And my heart still flows over with these feelings of gratitude and respect, which made saying goodbye so hard; and it remains a real pleasure to me still having found British hospitality outside the country, of which Smollet *) did not find even the slightest trace in England anymore.

Before I leave this island completely, I want to insert the notes that I had the opportunity to collect and compile there; and I hope they are to welcome to my readers because they largely originate from sensible Englishmen who have lived there for a long time.

Of course I can imagine that news about Madeira will seem superfluous to some of my readers; but if they are not to be found in the numerous voyages of so many voyagers, who circumnavigated the world, as this perhaps may be the case, then these news certainly require no further defense.

One overlooks only too easily things that are, so to speak, at one's front door, especially when one "is going out on discoveries" that are generally considered more important since they largely concern more distant countries.

Madera Island is approximately 55 English miles long and 10 miles wide.

It was first discovered on the 2nd Julius in 1419 by Joao Gonzales Zarco; for the fabulous tale claiming it was supposed to have been found by a certain Englishman, Machin, has no basis in historical fact.

It is divided into two "Capitaneas" (districts headed by a captain) which, because of the towns located therein, are called Funchal and Maxico (Maschiko).

The first Capitanea has two courts (Iudicaturas) of which one is in Funchal and the other is in Calhetta, the latter being an earldom and belonging to the family of Castello Melhor.

In the other Capitanea there are also two courts, one in Maxico and one in San Vincente.

Funchal, which is the only city (cidade) on this island, "lies on the southern coast of the same on the northern latitude of 32° 33'
34" and in 17° 12' 7" longitude west from Greenwich; "apart from this city, there are seven additional towns (or villas) on it.

Four of the same, Calhetta, Camara de Lobos, Ribeira braba and Ponta de Sol, belong to the Capitanea of Funchal, which is divided into twenty-six parishes.

The other three, namely: Maschiko, San Vincente and Santa Cruz, are in the Capitanea Maschiko, which has seventeen parishes in all.

The governor is the head of all civil and military departments on this island, on Porto Santo, on the Salvages and the Illhas desertas.
Don Joao Antonio de Saa Pereira held this post while I was on Madeira.

He was considered a very prudent and understanding, yet very reserved and nearly dubiously careful gentleman.

The department of justice is under the control of the Corregidor, to whom also all appeals from the lower courts are filed.

The king, who can grant and take away this position at his discretion, is in the habit of appointing people from Lisbon to this office.

Every court, (ludicatura) consists of a senate whose members elect a Juiz or judge as their chief justice.

He is called Juiz da Fora in Funchal, and, in case of the absence or death of the Corregidor, he is considered representative of the latter.

The foreign merchants elect their own judge, called Providor, who also has to collect the royal duties and revenues.

They amount to about 120,000 pounds sterling in all and are mainly used for the pay of the royal officials and troops, in turn as well as for the maintenance of the public buildings.

They consist of the fruit tithe, which belongs to the king as Grand Master of the Order of Christ; also, a tax of ten percent on all incoming goods with the sole exception of food, and finally a tax of eleven percent on all outgoing goods.

There is only one company of regular troops, one hundred men strong, on the island; the militia however is nearly three thousand men strong and organized in companies each of which has its captain, lieutenant and ensign.

Neither the militia's officers nor its militiamen received regular pay, but serving in it provided a certain status, everyone tries to be taken in.

They assemble once a year and drill for one month.

The whole military is under the command of Sergeant Mor, and the two Capitanos de Sal, which the governor has around him, perform adjudant services.

The number of word-churchmen on this island amounts to 1200, many of whom are used as a chaplain.

Ever since the expulsion of the Jesuits, there have been no good public schools here except for a seminary in which ten students, who still wear a red cloak over the student's traditional black attire, are taught at the king's expense by a priest placed for this purpose.

But those who want to be ordained as priest have to study at the newly built University of Coimbra in Portugal.

In Madeira there is also a cathedral chapter with a bishop whose income is much higher than the governor's, for it consists of one hundred and ten pipes of wine and forty measures of wheat, of which each measures twenty-four English bushels.

Measured in money, this yields in an average year about three thousand pounds sterling.

There are sixty to seventy Franciscans in four monasteries, one of which is located in Funchal and as in many monastries about 300 nuns belonging to the orders Mercy, S. Clara, Incarnacao and Bom Jesus.

The nuns of the latter order may leave the monastery and marry.
unit 1
Die Stadt Santa Cruz auf Madera lag Nachmittags um 6 Uhr gerade vor uns.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 4
unit 8
Hinter der Stadt ist noch ein andres Kastell, St. Joanno do Pico genannt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 15
Der jüngst ernannte Consul, Herr Murray war noch nicht angekommen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 22
unit 35
Die Insel Madera ist ohngefähr 55 englische Meilen lang und 10 Meilen breit.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 39
Auch in der andern Capitanea befinden sich zwey Gerichte, eines zu Maxico und eins in San Vincente.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 41
33'.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 42
34" und in 17°.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 47
Don Joao Antonio de Saa Pereira bekleidete diese Stelle als ich zu Madera war.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 58
Sie stößt jährlich einmal zusammen, und wird einen Monath lang exercirt.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 64
unit 66
Die Nonnen des letztgenannten Ordens dürfen das Kloster verlassen und heyrathen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 26  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 26  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 44  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 21  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 25  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 30  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 38  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 43  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 44  5 months, 2 weeks ago
3Bn37Arty • 2772  commented on  unit 30  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 58  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 61  5 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 58  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 57  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 57  5 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 57  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 56  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 65  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 32  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 34  5 months, 2 weeks ago
3Bn37Arty • 2772  commented on  unit 32  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 39  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 2  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 6  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 36  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 42  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 41  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 40  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 39  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 24  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 17  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 12  5 months, 2 weeks ago
3Bn37Arty • 2772  translated  unit 41  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 18  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 7  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 62  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 28  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 23  5 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 22  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 66  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 50  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 66  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 4  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 16  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 20  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 23  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 26  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 5  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 4  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 2  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 35  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 27  5 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 13  5 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented  5 months, 2 weeks ago

http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/book/view/forster_reise01_1778?p=51
Commons text;

by bf2010 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Die Stadt Santa Cruz auf Madera lag Nachmittags um 6 Uhr gerade vor uns.

Hier sahen wir die Berge von einer Menge tiefer Klüste und Thäler durchschnitten und auf den Rücken derselben verschiedene Landhäuser, deren überaus anmuthige Lage zwischen Weinbergen und hohen Cypressen, der Gegend ein sehr romantisches Ansehen gab.

Wir wurden mit Booten in die Rheede von Funchal boogsirt, weil es völlig Windstill war, und erst in dunkler Nacht kamen wir vor Anker.

Frühe am 29sten wurden wir durch den malerischen Anblick der Stadt Funchal sehr angenehm überrascht.

Sie liegt rund um die Rheede, auf einem sanft anlaufenden Grunde der Vorberge, und hat die Gestalt eines Amphiteaters.

Vermittelst dieser Lage fallen sämtliche Gebäude und Häuser um so viel vortheilhafter ins Gesicht; sie sind fast durchgehends weiß angestrichen;
viele sind zwey Stock hoch, und haben flache Dächer, welches ihnen eine Aehnlichkeit mit der morgenländischen Bauart und eine Simplicität giebt, die hier in England, unsern schmalen Häusern mit hohen, schräg zusammenlaufenden und mit einer ganzen Reihe von Schornsteinen bepflanzten Dächern, gänzlich zu fehlen pflegt.

Am Ufer sieht man verschiedene Batterien und Plattformen mit Kanon en, auch wird die Rheede von einem alten Kastell bestrichen, welches auf einem steilen schwarzen Felsen liegt, der bey hohem Wasser von der See umgeben ist, und von den Engländern the Loo-Rock genannt wird.

Hinter der Stadt ist noch ein andres Kastell, St. Joanno do Pico genannt.

Die nahgelegnen Höhen, auf welchen man überall Weinberge, umzäunte Gründe, Plantagen und Buschwerk nebst Landhäusern und verschiedenen Kirchen erblickt, machen die Schönheit der Landschaft vollkommen.

Alles erweckte den Begrif einer bezauberten Jusul, und gab uns eine Idee von den hängenden Gärten der Semiramis.

Um 7 Uhr kam ein Boot zu uns, welches das Prattique-Boot genannt wird und einen Capitain do Sal am Boord hatte.

Dieser Officier ist einer von den zween Guarda-Mores des Gesundheits-Collegii, welche die Quarantaine der Schiffe bestimmen, die aus der Barbarey oder Levante oder aus andern verdächtigen, der Pest unterworfnen, Gegenden ankommen.

Er erkundigte sich nach unserm Gesundheitszustande und dem Lande woher wir kämen, und
erfuhr was er zu wissen verlangte.

Kurz nachher landeten wir und giengen mit unsern Capitains zu Herrn Loughnan, einem englischen Kaufmann, der, vermöge Contracts, alle hier einlaufende Königliche Schiffe mit den erforderlichen Nothwendigkeiten versiehet.

Der jüngst ernannte Consul, Herr Murray war noch nicht angekommen.

Herr Loughnan aber empfing uns mit einer Gastfreyheit und einem Anstande, der ihm und der Nation Ehre macht.

Die Stadt entspricht bey weiten dem Begriffe nicht, den ihr äußeres Ansehen von der Rhede aus erregt; denn die Straßen sind eng und schlecht gepflastert und schmutzig;

die Häuser sind zwar von gehauenen oder gebacknen Steinen, aber innerhalb dunkel.
Nur diejenigen sind mit Glasfenstern versehen, welche den englischen Kaufleuten oder andern vornehmern Einwohnern gehören, die übrigen haben gemeiniglich Laden von Lattenwerk, welche oben an Hespen befestigt sind, und als Fenster geöfnet, auch erforderlichen Falls ausgehoben werden können.

Die untern Zimmer sind mehrentheils zu Wohnungen für Bediente, oder zu Kramläden und Waarenlagern bestimmt.

Was die Kirchen und Klöster betrift, so sind es schlechte Gebäude, die keine sonderliche Kenntniß der Architectur verrathen.

Ihr Inneres ist ohne Geschmack, denn das wenige Licht, welches von außen herein fällt, macht dem Auge nichts als eine Menge von Flitter-Zierrathen sichtbar, die in aller Absicht gothisch sind.

Das Franciscaner-Kloster ist nett und räumlich; aber ihr Garten schien in keiner guten Ordnung zu seyn.

Die Nonnen von St. Clara empfiengen uns sehr höflich am Gitter ihres Sprachzimmers, sandten aber hernach einige alte Weiber ab, um ihre verfertigte Blumen auszubiethen.

Wir machten hierauf mit Herrn Loughnan einen Spatziergang nach seinem Landhause, welches eine englische Meile von der Stadt auf einer Anhöhe gelegen ist, und fanden daselbst eine angenehme Gesellschaft, von den vornehmsten englischen Kaufleuten auf Madera.

Unsre Capitains giengen Abends wieder an Boord; wir aber machten uns Herrn Loughnans höfliches Anerbieten, während unsers kurzen Aufenthalts zu Madera in seinem Hause Platz zu nehmen, mit Vergnügen zu Nutze.

Am folgenden Morgen fiengen wir an, die landeinwärts gelegenen Gegenden der Insel zu untersuchen, und setzten diese Beschäftigung den folgenden Tag fort.

Um 5 Uhr Morgens giengen wir bergauf längst einem Bach, der uns in die innern bergigten Gegenden führte.

Um 1 Uhr Nachmittags kamen wir zu einem Castanienwalde, der nicht weit unterhalb der höchsten Bergspitze dieser Insel, ohngefähr 6 englische Meilen weit von Herrn Loughnans Gute liegt.

Hier war die Luft merklich kühler; und da wir gern den kürzesten Rückweg nehmen wollten, so mietheten wir einen Schwarzen, der uns nach anderthalb Stunden zu unserm gütigen Wirthe zurück brachte.

Am folgenden Tage wurden Anstalten zu unsrer Abreise gemacht und ich verließ nun mit gerührtem Herzen dies reizende Land und diese edelmüthigen Freunde, welche die Wonne, daß sie ihren Nebenmenschen froh sehen, zu schätzen, zu empfinden und zu genießen wissen.

Noch immer wallet mein Herz von jenen Regungen der Dankbarkeit und Hochachtung, die mir damals den Abschied so schwer machten;

und es bleibt mir ein wahrhaftes Vergnügen, brittische Gastfreyheit noch außerhalb Landes gefunden zu haben, von der Smollet *) in England selbst keine Spuhr mehr zu entdecken wußte.

Ehe ich diese Insel ganz verlasse, will ich die Anmerkungen einrücken, welche ich daselbst zu machen und zu sammlen Gelegenheit hatte; und ich hoffe sie sollen meinen Lesern willkommen seyn, weil sie sich größtentheils von verständigen Engländern herschreiben, die lange dort gewohnt haben.

Freylich kann ich mir vorstellen, daß Nachrichten von Madera einigen meiner Leser überflüßig scheinen werden;

wenn sie sich aber in den zahlreichen Reisen so vieler Seefahrer, welche die Welt
umschift haben, nicht finden sollten, wie dies vielleicht der Fall seyn mögte, so bedürfen sie wohl keiner weitern Schutzrede.

Nur gar zu leicht übersieht man Dinge, die uns gleichsam vor der Thür sind, vornemlich wenn man "auf Entdeckungen ausgeht," die gemeiniglich in eben dem Maaße für wichtiger gehalten
werden als sie weit entferntere Länder betreffen.

Die Insel Madera ist ohngefähr 55 englische Meilen lang und 10 Meilen breit.

Sie ward am 2ten Julius 1419 zuerst entdeckt von Joao Gonzales Zarco; denn die fabelhafte Erzählung, daß sie von einem gewissen Engländer Machin gefunden seyn soll, hat keinen historisch erweislichen Grund.

Sie wird in zwey Capitaneas getheilt, welche nach den darinn gelegnen Städten, Funchal und Maxico (Maschiko) heißen.

Die erstere Capitanea enthält zween Gerichtshöfe (Iudicaturas) davon der eine zu Funchal, der andre zu Calhetta ist;

dies letztere ist ein Städtchen, deren Gebiet den Titel einer Grafschaft hat, und der Familie Castello Melhor gehört.

Auch in der andern Capitanea befinden sich zwey Gerichte, eines zu Maxico und eins in San Vincente.

Funchal, welches die einzige Stadt, (cidade) in dieser Insel ist, -- "liegt
an der südlichen Küste derselben unter der nördlichen Breite von 32. 33'.
34" und in 17°. 12'.7" westlicher Länge von Greenwich; --" außer dieser Stadt
giebt es noch sieben Städtgen (oder Villas) darauf.

Viere derselben, als Calhetta, Camara de Lobos, Ribeira braba, und Ponta de Sol, sind in der Hauptmannschaft Funchal, welche in sechs und zwanzig Kirchspiele getheilt ist.

Die übrigen drey, namentlich: Maschicko, San Vincente und Santa Cruz, liegen in der Hauptmannschaft Maschiko, die überhaupt siebenzehn Kirchspiele hat.

Der Gouverneur ist das Oberhaupt aller bürgerlichen und Militär-Departements auf dieser Insel, auf Porto Santo, auf den Salvages und auf den Ilhas desertas.
Don Joao Antonio de Saa Pereira bekleidete diese Stelle als ich zu Madera war.

Man hielt ihn für einen sehr verständigen und einsichtsvollen, dabey aber sehr zurückhaltenden und bis zur Bedenklichkeit vorsichtigen Herrn.

Das Justitz-Departement steht unter dem Corregidor, an welchen auch alle Appellationen von den niedrigen Gerichtshöfen gerichtet werden.

Der König, welcher diese Stelle nach Gutbefinden vergeben und wiederum nehmen kann, pflegt Personen aus Lissabon zu diesem Posten zu ernennen.

Jeder Gerichtshof, (Iudicatura) besteht aus einen Senat, dessen Mitglieder sich einen Juiz oder Richter zu ihrem Vorsitzer wählen.

Zu Funchal heißt er Juiz da Fora, und dieser wird, in Abwesenheit oder bey Absterben des Corregidors, als desselben Repräsentant angesehen.

Die ausländischen Kaufleute wählen ihren eignen Richter, Providor genannt, welcher zugleich die Königlichen Zölle und Einkünfte einzunehmen hat.

Diese belaufen sich in allem ohngefähr auf 120,000 Pfund Sterling, und werden größtentheils auf Besoldung der Königlichen Bedienten und Truppen, wie auch zu Unterhaltung der öffentlichen
Gebäude wiederum verwendet.

Sie bestehen im Frucht-Zehnten, welcher dem Könige als Grosmeister des Christ-Ordens gehört; ferner in einer Auflage von zehn Procent auf alle einkommende Waaren, Lebensmittel allein ausgenommen, und endlich in einer Auflage von eilf Procent von allen ausgehenden Gütern.

Es giebt nur eine Compagnie regulairer Truppen von hundert Mann auf der Insel;

die Miliz hingegen ist an dreytausend Mann stark und in Compagnien eingetheilt, deren jede ihren Capitain, einen Lieutenant und einen Fähnrich hat.

Weder Officier noch Gemeine dieser Miliz werden besoldet, weil man aber einen gewissen Rang durch sie bekommt, so bemüht sich ein jeder darinn aufgenommen zu werden.

Sie stößt jährlich einmal zusammen, und wird einen Monath lang exercirt.

Das ganze Militär steht unter dem Serjeante Mor, und die beyden Capitanos de Sal, welche der Gouverneur um sich hat, thun Adjudanten-Dienste.

Die Anzahl der Welt-Geistlichen auf dieser Insel beläuft sich auf 1200, wovon viele als Haus-Informators gebraucht werden.

Seit Vertreibung der Jesuiten giebts hier keine ordentliche öffentliche Schule, außer einem Seminario, darin auf Kosten des Königs, von einem dazu gesetzten Priester, zehen Studenten unterrichtet werden, welche über die gewöhnliche schwarze Studenten-Tracht noch einen rothen Mantel haben.

Wer die Priesterweihe haben will, muß aber auf der neueingerichteten Universität Coimbra in Portugal studiren.

Hiernächst ist zu Madera ein Capittel unter einem Bischof, dessen Einkünfte beträchtlicher sind als des Gonverneurs, denn sie bestehen aus einhundert und zehn Pipen Wein und aus vierzig Muys Weitzen, wovon jedes vier und zwanzig englische Buschel hält.

Dies bringt ihm in gewöhnlichen Jahren, nach Gelde gerechnet, ohngefähr dreytausend Pfund Sterling ein.

Auch giebt es sechzig bis siebenzig Franciscaner in vier Klöstern, wovon eins zu Funchal ist, und in eben so viel Klöstern, ohngefähr dreyhundert Nonnen, welche zu den Orden Mercy, S. Clara, Incarnacao und Bom Jesus gehören.

Die Nonnen des letztgenannten Ordens dürfen das Kloster verlassen und heyrathen.